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Old 07-06-2010, 11:24 AM   #61
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Yes, enjoying page 6 of this thread.
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Old 07-06-2010, 12:35 PM   #62
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Originally Posted by lightgiver View Post
Cheers for that AA and Raphael.

What do you feel about this,

An angel/music cipher that points out 3 notes of the music to The Rosslyn Motet accounting for 70% of the entire cube sequence. It is so subtle a decoy that you are supposed to think it is a musician playing a Harp or Psaltery, but when you look in detail, he is actually pointing strategically at 3 different lines and spaces of a stave of music. Referring to the first 3 cubes rising above his head.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cy2Dg-ncWoY

any connections?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j1C-GXQ1LdY

LOL your videos weren't showing up, I was thinking, "What's everyone talking about?"
Quoting you to see if they show up. Watching the first video now.

Last edited by armoured_amazon; 07-06-2010 at 12:35 PM.
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Old 07-06-2010, 12:50 PM   #63
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Originally Posted by armoured_amazon View Post
LOL your videos weren't showing up, I was thinking, "What's everyone talking about?"
Quoting you to see if they show up. Watching the first video now.


Yes the videos still disappear after all this time

such a shame people miss the heavenly music

Last edited by lightgiver; 07-06-2010 at 12:51 PM.
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Old 08-06-2010, 03:46 PM   #64
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Wtf happened with Steve Penny?
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Old 09-06-2010, 09:29 AM   #65
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Wtf happened with Steve Penny?
My understanding is that he resigned from Masonry in Scotland. Perhaps he is joining the GLAE.
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Old 09-06-2010, 04:13 PM   #66
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How did he bring GLoS into disrepute... Stewart mentioned something along those lines?

I liked Steve's posts, he could think for himself.
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Old 09-06-2010, 05:34 PM   #67
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How did he bring GLoS into disrepute... Stewart mentioned something along those lines?
While I grew up in a single parent family my wider family was and I understand is quite masonic (GLOS). Up until Steves posts here, albeit I am focusing to a degree on those he aimed at me, I never had any great concerns about GLoS. Ambulances on call for some raisings aside Up in Scotland Lodges are often fairly well respected in the community, mind you they are much more visible. Anyhow the simple fact is that the manner in which Steve interacted with me here and elsewhere, for the first time ever made me look upon GLoS with less respect. My heart quite literally fell. Single handedly Steve, in my eyes brought GLoS into disrepute in terms of my own personal opinion of the organisation. I realise from his writings that he is family connected with Scots aristocracy and his helping role in George Street mean that to me he has a greater responsibility that most to represent GLoS well. But to me he simply destroyed GLoS credibility, trust, respect etc in my eyes.

Now to be fair to Steve he has apologised to me and has explained to me why he did what he did. But nevertheless, the damage has been done.

It is truly sad. But to me he has brought GLoS into disrepute and if I was his Grand Master I would be throwing the book at him, after taking him aside and seeing if I could guide him to act differently.

That all said from some of his posts it seems to me that he has been struggling with some personal issues and perhaps the way he interacted with me was simply his way of dealing with it. He, after all, wouldnt be the first UGLE amity Freemason who had had "frustrations" who has - how can I delicately put this - "focused on me" then years later apologised and thanked me for being there for them. (though I havent been there for Steve)

But he has in my eyes damaged GLoS reputation. I certainly think considerably less of GLoS now than before he interacted with me.

Ordinarily I would be wondering if he was a teenager in (pick any far away country) having fun, but his knoweldge of GLoS suggests that he wrote the truth.

All academic nowadays as I have given up on ugle-amity Freemasonry. I genuinely wish it well, and keep my fingers crossed for it, and in many ways am very grateful to it, but the way that members like Steve (and many others over the years) behave towards me is in my opinion apauling.

And yes Steve, I do understand the explanations you have given me for your behaviour.
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http://www.youtube.com/user/MrStewartEdwards

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Old 10-06-2010, 12:13 AM   #68
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And of course, Steve Penny was not actually his real name.
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Old 10-06-2010, 02:11 PM   #69
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Originally Posted by raphael View Post
E flat, G and B flat
Those are the 3 notes, or at least that is what I read.



I found this interesting "Mozart wrote thirteen such lodge songs, but five of these are missing"

wrote 13 - 5 missing = 8 <<< Fibonacci numbers

both ratios are Fibonacci >>> 13/8 and 8/5 = phi golden ratio

namaste

Major triad for Eb Major... Eb G Bb

Are also the sacred numbers of it's relative minor - C Minor... 3rd, 5th and 7th

C minor has been associated with heroic struggle since Beethoven's time, with the quintessential work in the key being his Symphony No. 5; see Beethoven and C minor.

Mozart wrote 2 piano concertos in C Minor:

Great Mass in C minor (Mozart) - Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Piano Concerto No. 24 - Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Last edited by macneil; 10-06-2010 at 02:21 PM.
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Old 02-04-2012, 10:06 PM   #70
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Arrow Masonic Music

[1]–[2] Cantata fragment „Dir, Seele des Weltalls“ (“To You, Soul of the Universe”) for choir, tenor solo, strings, flute, two oboes, clarinet, bassoon and two horns in E flat major, K. 429

This work, dated 1783 in an unknown hand, is far more likely to come from a later period. The writer of the words, Lorenz Leopold Haschka, is also the author of the imperial hymn „Gott erhalte…“ (“May God preserve…”), adapted as the present German national anthem. The accompanying chorus, in the Masonic key of E flat major, is a hymn to the sun in the spirit of Egyptomania characterized also by Die Zauberflöte (The Magic Flute). The tenor aria is in the key of B flat major—the key of the Masonic Fellow Craft.

[3] Adagio in F major for two basset horns and bassoon, K. 410
[4] Adagio in B flat major for two clarinets and three basset horns, K. 411

The Adagio in F major, only 27 bars long, and the Adagio in B flat major, both probably dating from 1785, are fragments of what was perhaps intended as a larger work of ritual music. The ascending tonalities of F major and B flat major, in the Masonic sense, as well as the striding rhythm, could refer to a Masonic admission ceremony: on completion of the three ritual “journeys”, each accompanied by music, the seeker becomes a Freemason. From its earliest days Masonic music was dominated by wind instruments. The basset horn, a kind of tenor clarinet, with its dark, mystical tone-quality, represents final things in Mozart’s world. The Adagio in F major is a canon and is thus a symbol of the chain of brotherhood. The Adagio in B flat major contains some pauses, probably to give a lodge official time to read out some ritual texts. In the coda the theme from the Finale of the Jupiter Symphony is heard at the outset.

[5] „Lied der Gesellenreise“ (“Song for the Initiate’s Journey”), in B flat major, for voice and piano, K. 468

Mozart wrote this song on the occasion of his promotion to the rank of Entered Apprentice into the “Wahren Eintracht” lodge on 7 January 1785. The text was written by the councillor of state, editor and poet Joseph Franz Ratschky.

[6] „Zerfliesset heut’, geliebte Brüder“ (“Run this day, beloved brothers”), in B flat major, K. 483
[7] „Ihr unsre neuen Leiter“ (“You, our new leaders”), in G major, K. 484, for tenor, men’s chorus and piano

On 14 January 1786 the work of the Illuminati achieved something of its purpose when the Emperor Joseph II amalgamated the Viennese lodges into two joint lodges. For its inauguration Mozart wrote two three-part choruses, probably to texts by the Bohemian ex-Jesuit and state official Augustin Veith von Schittlersberg. Ignaz von Born became Master of the newly-formed lodge “Zur Wahrheit” (“Truth”), while Mozart’s lodge “Neugekrönte Hoffnung” (“New- Crowned Hope”) was led by Tobias Freiherr von Gebler. In September 1786, however, Born gave up all his duties and in 1787 abandoned Freemasonry. The first chorus is in praise of the wisdom of Joseph II, which must have gone against the grain for Mozart, and so he plots a little revenge. The paean of praise comes a cropper in the second line when the text and music diverge awkwardly at the word “Joseph”, the name of the Emperor, and at the word “Wohltätigkeit”, the name of Mozart’s mother-lodge, now closed.

[8] „Die Maurerfreude“ (“Masonic Joy”) in E flat major for tenor and men’s chorus, strings, two oboes, two clarinets and two horns, K. 471

Once again this is in praise of Joseph II, yet from a time when the Masonic world was not under threat and was still accepted. On 24 April 1785 the lodge “Zur gekrönten Hoffnung” (“To Crowned Hope”) held a celebratory gathering for Ignaz von Born, whose influence on the Emperor was at its greatest. The cantata performed there was to a text by the secular priest Franz Petran. To be on the safe side it thanks the Emperor for his attitude and way of thinking, friendly towards the Masons.

[9] Maurerische Trauermusik (Masonic Funeral Music) in C minor for strings, two oboes, clarinet, basset horn, contrabassoon and two French horns (later replaced by two basset horns), K. 477

The 69 bars of this masterpiece, dated July 1785, have disturbed historians as much as they have unsettled listeners. For the lodge-brothers Duke Georg August Mecklenburg-Strelitz and Count Franz Esterházy von Galantha, for whose funerals the work was performed on 17 November 1785 in the Crowned Hope Lodge were, at the time it was written, still alive. Today it is thought that the work was written as ritual music for the installation of a Master, whose elevation symbolic death crowns through resurrection. The three-part(!) work goes from C minor to E flat major, then to C major. It begins with a heart-rending lament from the wind players, in C minor. This leads into a chorale in E flat major, based on the Lamentations of Jeremiah, which would have been sung in synagogues in memory of the destruction of the temple of Solomon. This temple, however, is the symbolic ideal of the Masonic life and the murder of its architect a great mystery. At the end of the work the C minor key of the beginning returns, changing for the last chord into C major, but its highest note is not the bright C but the note E: the elevation (to Master) is not a proud finale, but rather the beginning of the next stage of the journey.

[10] „Die ihr des unermesslichen Weltalls Schöpfer ehrt“ (“Thou that honourest the Creator of the measureless universe”) in C major for solo voice and piano, K. 619

When Mozart completed this cantata, on 12 July in the year of his death, 1791, he was in the middle of writing The Magic Flute. The project of the Hamburg Mason Franz-Heinrich Ziegenhagen, however, fascinated him. Ziegenhagen offered a supplementary work to his treatise Lehre vom richtigen Verhältnis zu den Schöpfungswerken (The Doctrine of the Right Relationship with the Works of Creation), an account of the utopian communal life of young people, for the implementation of which this follower of Rousseau had already acquired a plot of land in Alsace. This was a region of French revolutionary activity and the text argues for the co-ordination of religions against Catholic dogma.

[11]–[12] Adagio and Fugue in C minor, K. 546, arranged for string orchestra

The principal theme of the fugue is based on an anapaestic Masonic signal in use at that time. The fugue, the form of which often symbolizes the chain of brotherhood, originates from 1783 in a version for two pianos. Mozart became a Freemason in the following year but had maintained close contact with the movement ever since his move to Vienna in 1781.

The stimulus to write the Adagio and Fugue came from the Illuminato Gottfried van Swieten, the librettist of the Haydn oratorios. The work is in the “mysterious” key of C minor and in 1788 Mozart reworked it for string quartet or string orchestra and placed the Adagio first.

[13] „Lobgesang auf die feierliche Johannisloge: O heiliges Band der Freundschaft“ (“Hymn of Praise for Festivities at the St John Lodge: O sacred bond of friendship”) in D major for solo voice with piano accompaniment, K. 148

This work, written in 1772 in Salzburg to a text by the Mason Ludwig Friedrich Lenz for the Munich lodge “Zur Behutsamkeit” (“To Caution”), is the first indication of the sixteen-year old composer’s interest in Freemasonry.

[14]–[17] „Eine kleine Freimaurer-Kantate: Laut verkünde unsre Freude“ (“Little Masonic Cantata: Loudly proclaim our joy”) in C major for two tenors and bass, strings, flute, two oboes and two horns, K. 623

On 15 November 1791 Mozart entered the cantata, to a text by Schikaneder, into his list of works. Three days later the work was given its first performance on the occasion of the official opening of the new temple of the “New-Crowned Hope” Lodge. Less than three weeks later Mozart was dead. This, the last work to be entered into his catalogue of works in his own hand, goes beyond the bright realm of the canon of his Masonic keys. Here he was clearly on safe ground, while he brought his profane life to an end in the agony of the Requiem, written in the terrifying key of D minor. After the exultant chorus in C major, “Loudly proclaim our joy”, there follow a recitative and aria for tenor, in G major, then a recitative and duet for tenor and baritone in F major before the opening chorus returns and so the work comes full circle, like a chain, without beginning or end. Mozart bids farewell to the world in the redemptive key of C major, euphoric and at peace, filled with the fire of faith.



http://forum.davidicke.com/showthrea...=65922&page=25
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Old 02-04-2012, 11:00 PM   #71
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Arrow Freimaurer Kantata (Freemason music)


Let us share every burden
with the full weight of love;
then we shall receive here
with dignity the true light of the east.
In order to gain this advantage.
begin our work quickly.
And even that which is already begun start again today.
If in this place we have
dedicated our hearts and our words
entirely to virtue,
oh, then envy is stilled
and that wish utterly fulfilled
that crown our hopes...



Quote:
Work for voice or voices and instruments of the Baroque era. From its beginnings in early 17th-century Italy, both secular and religious cantatas were written. The earliest cantatas were generally for solo voice and minimal instrumental accompaniment. Cantatas soon developed a dramatic character and alternating sections of recitative and aria, paralleling the simultaneous development of opera, and they came to resemble unstaged operatic scenes or acts. In Germany the Lutheran cantata developed more directly out of the expanding choral motet, and almost always involved a chorus. A single chorale (hymn) often served as the basis for an entire cantata, which might have up to 10 diverse numbers, including duets, recitatives, and choral fugues.

Chant (from French chanter) is the rhythmic speaking or singing of words or sounds, often primarily on one or two pitches called reciting tones. Chants may range from a simple melody involving a limited set of notes to highly complex musical structures, often including a great deal of repetition of musical subphrases, such as Great Responsories and Offertories of Gregorian chant. Chant may be considered speech, music, or a heightened or stylized form of speech. In the later Middle Ages some religious chant evolved into song (forming one of the roots of later Western music)...

Chanting ( mantra, sacred text, the name of God/Spirit, etc.) is a commonly used spiritual practice. Like prayer, chant may be a component of either personal or group practice. Diverse spiritual traditions consider chant a route to spiritual development...E flat major is the fundamental key of Freemasonry.
http://freemasonry.bcy.ca/biography/...reimaurer.html


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Old 17-04-2012, 07:55 PM   #72
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Arrow Requiem


The Requiem Mass in D minor (K. 626) by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was composed in Vienna in 1791 and left unfinished at the composer's death on December 5. A completion by Franz Xaver Süssmayr was delivered to Count Franz von Walsegg, who had anonymously commissioned the piece for a requiem Mass to commemorate the February 14 anniversary of his wife's death.

The Requiem is scored for 2 basset horns in F, 2 bassoons, 2 trumpets in D, 3 trombones (alto, tenor & bass), timpani (2 drums), violins, viola and basso continuo (cello, double bass, and organ). The vocal forces include soprano, contralto, tenor, and bass soloists and a SATB mixed choir.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Requiem_(Mozart)

http://forum.davidicke.com/showpost....&postcount=194

http://forum.davidicke.com/showpost....&postcount=354

Last edited by lightgiver; 17-04-2012 at 08:09 PM.
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Old 19-04-2012, 04:18 PM   #73
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yay for music and this is what i have to say aboput the speed of sound!
the next sound may be predicted but is not yet made!
something which explodes and breaks the sound barrier is equally not yet made!
Both have potential..
but have only ever happened in the past!
queue the masonic fingers and the silent semi crochet!
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Old 19-04-2012, 11:03 PM   #74
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Originally Posted by azaziel01 View Post
Wasn't there a significance in the number 3 in Mozart's music?
Yes.
The numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18, 19 and 20 or any multiples or factors of those numbers are totally sacred to the Freemasons.

If you see any of those numbers then I am afraid it is already too late.
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Old 24-04-2012, 10:53 AM   #75
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Arrow Mozarts Funeral


Mozart - Masonic Funeral Music for Orchestra in C minor, K. 479a477...

Throat cut from ear to ear . . . tongue torn out by its roots . . . bowels taken out and burned . . . scattered to the four winds of heaven . . . heart plucked out and given to the beasts of the field.

Last edited by lightgiver; 24-04-2012 at 10:53 AM.
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Old 29-04-2012, 07:19 PM   #76
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Default List of other Masonic Composers.

Composers
Irving Berlin - Munn Lodge No.190 New York City, NY
Ludwig van Beethoven
George Michael Cohan (1878-1942), author of Yankee Doodle Dandy
Gilbert & Sullivan
W.C. Handy
Franz Haydn
Jerome Kern
Franz Liszt
Wolfgang Mozart
Hans Schuler
Jean Julius Sibelius - Suomi Lodge No. 1, Helsinki, Finland
John Phillip Sousa
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Old 29-04-2012, 08:06 PM   #77
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Arrow List of more masonic com posers

http://www.masonmusic.org/composers.html
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Old 29-04-2012, 09:19 PM   #78
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This would explain one of the things I have learned in Musicology - the Western Canon. If you don't know what that is, here's a wiki for it

The Western Cannon presents all the art, music, literature etc which is regarded as 'valuable' or influential to Western Culture. It is a very narrow minded and prejudice system which prioritizes the works of upper class dead white men. There are no female composers published as part of the Western Canon, and I think the same goes for art and literature (maybe the Bronte's are in there?)

What you will also notice is the relationships between the published composers regarded 'canon'. i.e. Mozart was trained by J.S. Bach's son, and Berlioz shared company with the likes of Paganini, Liszt and Chopin. It seems like many of the connections were Masonic, and as very many of the 'great composers' worked for rich families and 'impresarios' , very often European Royals and the Catholic Church, there was big money exchanging hands and the composers were invited to mix in high society - funny how so many died young and poor, Mozart was rumored to have been murdered, and I guess he wasn't the only one. The music industry hasn't changed much after all!!
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Old 29-04-2012, 09:27 PM   #79
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Arrow This World is Utterly Insane

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Originally Posted by twilight_sparkle View Post
This would explain one of the things I have learned in Musicology - the Western Canon.The music industry hasn't changed much after all!!
The Worlds not changed...

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Old 30-04-2012, 03:38 AM   #80
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Originally Posted by twilight_sparkle View Post
...The Western Cannon presents all the art, music, literature etc which is regarded as 'valuable' or influential to Western Culture. It is a very narrow minded and prejudice system which prioritizes the works of upper class dead white men...
Can you give us an example of which non-"upper class dead white men" are being undervalued in this prioritization?
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