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Old 05-11-2009, 05:29 PM   #1
schaff
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Default Making a fire

This is the most important skill you should learn and be able to do in any condition i think it has been covered before but i think it deserves its own thread as it is the life blood of your camp.There are some great videos on youtube that i am going to post and hope that some of the more experienced posters on here can share some of their techniques and experience with us for this vital knowledge.

WITH A FIRESTEEL

WITH A BOW DRILL


HOW TO MAKE FIRE IN WET CONDITIONS



Last edited by schaff; 05-11-2009 at 05:35 PM.
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Old 05-11-2009, 10:15 PM   #2
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Excellent thread - cheers for the videos too, im downloading them.

^The Best Homemade Fire Tinder Demonstration

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Old 05-11-2009, 10:26 PM   #3
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Hand drill

Flint on Marcasite

Friction Fire Series: Bow Drill

Friction Fire Series: Strap Drill

Friction Fire Series: Fire Thong

Friction Fire Series: Fire Piston

A good website - http://www.wildwoodsurvival.com/surv...ire/index.html
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Old 05-11-2009, 11:59 PM   #4
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great thread mate!!

Last edited by kernelpower; 06-11-2009 at 12:00 AM.
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Old 06-11-2009, 06:09 PM   #5
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Thanks for the replys i really liked the flint on marcasite vid petercookie such a primative way to make fire.
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Old 09-11-2009, 04:34 PM   #6
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The fire plow


Ray Mears making fire from fungi


I am having a hard job finding videos with indeginous tribes making fires their traditional way here is one i found

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Old 12-01-2010, 03:26 PM   #7
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Nice little vid here this is a vital skill we should all learn especially after the past few weeks

MAKING FIRE IN THE SNOW


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Old 13-01-2010, 03:03 PM   #8
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preparation for that first strike of a match/lighter or flint is the most important thing to start fires , have everything to hand .

wee tip (pardon the pun )
smokers filter tips sold in strips for around a pound are neat little kindlers
tiny at only 2cm each they light easy and give enough of a start to most fires , pick them apart till fluffy .
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Old 14-01-2010, 11:32 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sannox View Post
preparation for that first strike of a match/lighter or flint is the most important thing to start fires , have everything to hand .

wee tip (pardon the pun )
smokers filter tips sold in strips for around a pound are neat little kindlers
tiny at only 2cm each they light easy and give enough of a start to most fires , pick them apart till fluffy .
thanks for the tips sannox , good stuff .
yes preps are very important before you start , funny though , making a fire is simple once you know how , but the vast numbers of humans that cant simply start what a cave man could is staggering .

this is a good thread Schaff .



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Old 14-01-2010, 12:20 PM   #10
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Survival Skills: Firemaking, Southeast US by Nutnfancy

pt2

Survival Skills: Firemaking in Snow, Part 1

pt2

pt3

pt4

pt5

How To Build a Self-Feeding Fire - Wilderness Survival Skills
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Old 14-01-2010, 12:25 PM   #11
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How To Make Char Cloth
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Old 14-01-2010, 12:29 PM   #12
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brilliant stuff petercookie thanks .

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Old 14-01-2010, 12:31 PM   #13
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Cheers mate.

Fire - Bow Drill
A Friction Fire Inquiry: Bow Drill
by Storm
http://www.wildwoodsurvival.com/surv...iry/index.html
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Old 14-01-2010, 10:39 PM   #14
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A LIGHTER.

Im gonna buy a couple hundred(?) and put away.
__________________
Man will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.

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Old 19-01-2010, 02:44 PM   #15
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Got a handy list here for those who need to know which wood to use on their campfire very basic list but useful anyway.

Quote:
The Burning Properties of Wood

Below is a list of the most common woods for burning, there are more. It is worth remembering that ALL wood will burn better if split.

There is an old saying, "before starting a fire - collect the right wood." It is worth learning which wood is best for your fires as it will make life a lot easier. A natural result of tree recognition is to learn the burning properties of their woods

Alder: Poor in heat and does not last,

Apple: Splendid/ It bums slowly and steadily when dry, with little flame, but good heat. The scent is pleasing.

Ash: Best burning wood; has both flame and heat, and will bum when green, though naturally not as well as when dry.

Beech: A rival to ash, though not a close one, and only fair when green. If it has a fault, it is apt to shoot embers a long way.

Birch: The heat is good but it burns quickly. The smell is pleasant.

Cedar: Good when dry. Full of crackle and snap. It gives little flame but much heat, and the scent is beautiful.

Cherry: Burns slowly, with good heat. Another wood with the advantage of scent Chestnut. Mediocre. Apt to shoot embers. Small flame and heating power. Douglas Fir. Poor. Little flame and heat.

Chestnut: Mediocre. Apt to shoot embers. Small flame and heating power.

Douglas Fir: Poor. Little flame or heat.

Elder: Mediocre. Very smoky. Quick burner, with not much heat.

Elm: Commonly offered for sale. To bum well it needs to be kept for two years. Even then it will smoke. Vary variable fuel.

Hazel: Good.

Holly: Good, will burn when green, but best when kept a season.

Hornbeam: Almost as good as beech.

Laburnum: Totally poisonous tree, acrid smoke, taints food and best never used.

Larch: Crackly, scented, and fairly good for heat.

Laurel: Has brilliant flame.

Lime: Poor. Burns with dull flame.

Maple: Good.

Oak: The novelist's 'blazing fire of oaken logs' is fanciful, Oak is sparse in flame and the smoke is acrid, but dry old oak is excellent for heat, burning slowly and steadily until whole log collapses into cigar-like ash.

Pear: A good heat and a good scent.

Pine: Bums with a splendid flame, but apt to spit. The resinous Weymouth pine has a lovely scent and a cheerful blue flame.

Plane: Burns pleasantly, but is apt to throw sparks if very dry. Plum. Good heat and scent.

Plum: Good heat and aromatic.

Poplar: Truly awful.

Rhododendron: The thick old stems, being very tough, burn well.

Robinia (Acacia): Burns slowly, with good heat, but with acrid smoke.

Spruce: Burns too quickly and with too many sparks.

Sycamore: Burns with a good flame, with moderate heat. Useless green.

Thorn: Quite one of the best woods. Burns slowly, with great heat and little smoke. Walnut. Good, so is the scent.

Walnut: Good, and so is the scent. Aromatic wood.

Willow: Poor. It must be dry to use, and then it burns slowly, with little flame. Apt to spark.

Yew: Last but among the best. Burns slowly, with fierce heat, and the scent is pleasant.
Thanks tracker,peter cookie and sannox (good little tip about the filters )for the replies.
And burial if your gonna go for lighters i would go for a zippo and plenty of fuel at least they are windproof and have more of a flame than your clipper.
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Old 19-01-2010, 11:56 PM   #16
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Thanks for that good info............. im gonna save that.
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Old 22-01-2010, 09:45 AM   #17
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Some vids on water proofing matches and homemade tinder

WATER PROFFING MATCHES ( o make your matches go further if needed spilt in half or quarters with a sharp knife)


HOMEMADE TINDER


WOODLAND TINDER PT 1


WOODLAND TIDER PT2


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Old 25-01-2010, 04:58 PM   #18
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Had to get a fire going at work today so was experimenting with different tinder's tried some pampas grass lights on the first strike of my firesteel and lasts for a while defo one for the tinder pouch.
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Old 27-01-2010, 10:27 AM   #19
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Where have all the videos from this thread gone .
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Old 27-01-2010, 10:34 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by schaff View Post
This is the most important skill you should learn and be able to do in any condition i think it has been covered before but i think it deserves its own thread as it is the life blood of your camp.There are some great videos on youtube that i am going to post and hope that some of the more experienced posters on here can share some of their techniques and experience with us for this vital knowledge.

WITH A FIRESTEEL
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eVcHWoT2jmE

WITH A BOW DRILL

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p6iSzI8vYl4

HOW TO MAKE FIRE IN WET CONDITIONS

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qhGG8O3h1xI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hEBrj...eature=related
Hmm
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