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Old 07-03-2009, 04:18 PM   #1
jonas parker
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Exclamation Food storage without refrigeration

Cruising World Magazine’s January 2009 Issue has a valuable article on food storage without refrigeration. It includes downloadable charts in PDF format. I would recommend that anyone not certain of the long-term power grid operation might want to take a look at these charts which list the specific food (everything from fresh fruits and vegetables to canned goods), the best way to store without refrigeration, the expected shelf life of the food, and informative notes. The article is titled:

Cruising without the Fridge
Stowage charts for provisions to help you have fresh food for your passages.
From "Hands-On Sailor" Dec 15, 2008
By Beth A. Leonard

It can be found at the following link:

http://www.cruisingworld.com/how-to/...000067819.html
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Old 07-03-2009, 04:22 PM   #2
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Some good tips there, thanks jonas .

"mayonnaise keeps indefinitely", he he
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Old 07-03-2009, 05:01 PM   #3
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first your pemmican thread jonas, and now this.

i can't thank you enough! downloading the pdf right away, i'm sure the tips will prove to be very handy in the years to come.

sorry if i sound stupid, but can anyone explain why UHT products would have an advantage over more 'naturally' derived foods- such as raw/unadulterated dairy + dairy products and juices? (other than having preservatives pumped in them.)

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Old 07-03-2009, 05:08 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by pinkfreud View Post
sorry if i sound stupid, but can anyone explain why UHT products would have an advantage over more 'naturally' derived foods- such as raw/unadulterated dairy + dairy products and juices? (other than having preservatives pumped in them.)
Surely it's just that UHT products will keep longer?
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Old 07-03-2009, 05:11 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dreamweaver View Post
Surely it's just that UHT products will keep longer?
sorry, i think i worded my previous post incorrectly.

...i do know that, just wondering what would happen in an environment where one has access only to raw foods and liquids instead of the supermarket/retail variety; i'm assuming that the storage capability would be much more limited, but yeah just wanna be sure.

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Old 10-03-2009, 06:47 PM   #6
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Terracotta ''Zeer pots'' will keep your perishable food chilled!
Cheap AND effective!Make any size you like. Some of us that live on boats will use these, as 12/24volt fridges cost to much to run off of a leisure battery bank.

http://www.goselfsufficient.co.uk/po...ator-zeer.html

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Old 20-06-2009, 05:04 PM   #7
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We'd do well to look to the past.

One feature of medeival castles (and far earlier) in Europe and the Middle east are the deep dark cellars.

Even in the middle eastern castles, large chunks of ice built up in these storage areas.
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Old 23-06-2009, 06:53 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jonas parker View Post
Cruising World Magazine’s January 2009 Issue has a valuable article on food storage without refrigeration. It includes downloadable charts in PDF format. I would recommend that anyone not certain of the long-term power grid operation might want to take a look at these charts which list the specific food (everything from fresh fruits and vegetables to canned goods), the best way to store without refrigeration, the expected shelf life of the food, and informative notes. The article is titled:

Cruising without the Fridge
Stowage charts for provisions to help you have fresh food for your passages.
From "Hands-On Sailor" Dec 15, 2008
By Beth A. Leonard

It can be found at the following link:

http://www.cruisingworld.com/how-to/...000067819.html
Nice article.

Ive always liked pickling and curing food for long term storage.
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Old 11-05-2010, 03:42 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by naturalcanvas View Post
Terracotta ''Zeer pots'' will keep your perishable food chilled!

Cheap AND effective!Make any size you like. Some of us that live on boats will use these, as 12/24volt fridges cost to much to run off of a leisure battery bank.

http://www.goselfsufficient.co.uk/po...ator-zeer.html

This is a really good resource, thanks.


The Pot-in-Pot Refrigerator: Zeer




For most of us a fridge in the kitchen is an essential: how else can you keep your food fresh? Or cool your drinking water on hot summer days? But a fridge is one of the biggest electricity-devouring devices in your home, and that's not good for the environment.

Per minute, it doesn’t need much electricity to run a fridge, especially if you compare it to an electric kettle, which can use 10 times as much, but remember that your fridge is on for 24 hours, 7 days a week. Even today's more efficient fridges that claim to be environmentally friendly still need a constant supply of electricity.

Wouldn’t it be wonderful for the environment – and your electricity bills – if there were a way of keeping food cool that didn’t entail such a drain on the national grid? Well, now there is!

The History of the Zeer

Unsurprisingly perhaps it’s in a hot third world country that such a method has been invented. The scorching 40 degree heat of a summer day in Africa is not conducive to keeping food cool and fresh. Farmers have to dispose of their crops quickly or eat rotten food, and a lot of the harvested produce is wasted.

In the 1990s, Muhammed Bah Abba was working for aid agencies in Nigeria, trying to find ways to help small communities, when he recalled his childhood experience growing up in a family of pot-makers.

He worked out that by putting one earthenware pot inside another and creating an insulating layer in-between, it would be possible to create an effective cooling system. He spent two years experimenting before coming up with the prototype for the award-winning desert cooler, which is now being marketed throughout Nigeria and other parts of Africa.

The desert cooler does not require electricity or any other power source, making it ideal for third world rural villages - or people trying to live their lives in a more environmentally friendly way. According to Science in Africa magazine a zeer will keep tomatoes fresh – or edible - for up to 20 days; even meat can be kept in good condition for a week or two.

And all it takes is some sand, water and two pots.

Here’s What You Do
  • Find two large flowerpots – earthenware not plastic! One should be about 2-3 cm's larger in diameter than the other. If they have holes at the bottom plug with a piece of clay or cork.
  • Put a layer of sand in the bottom of the larger pot.
  • Place the smaller pot inside the larger. The layer of sand needs to be thick enough for the two pots to end up about the same height.
  • Carefully fill between the pots with sand.
  • Pour water on the sand until it can’t absorb any more.
  • Cover with a damp cloth.
  • Check the water and the cloth regularly: you’ll need to refill about twice a day.
  • Keep in a dry, well-ventilated space.
How it Works

The water in the sand evaporates in the heat. This in turn draws heat out from the inner pot, thus keeping cool food stored inside. By keeping the sand wet, it becomes an ongoing process.

At the moment, the zeer, or pot-to-pot fridge, is only suitable for keeping food cool on a small scale, but has been proved to be so effective, that it may only be a matter of time before this environmentally friendly food and water cooler is developed further.

http://www.goselfsufficient.co.uk/potinpot...rator-zeer.html
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Old 11-05-2010, 06:05 AM   #10
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Thumbs up Thanks for sharing

Good thread, love the zeer
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Old 11-05-2010, 04:01 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by naturalcanvas View Post
Terracotta ''Zeer pots'' will keep your perishable food chilled!
Cheap AND effective!Make any size you like. Some of us that live on boats will use these, as 12/24volt fridges cost to much to run off of a leisure battery bank.

http://www.goselfsufficient.co.uk/po...ator-zeer.html

Those pot in a pot things are the way to go.

Also, houses were made with s single door to the north and the majority of windows to the sun. They had a cool room on the north wall for storage and a centraly located fire and stove for maximum heat in winter. Anyway, most things were fresh for the day or dried/cured. They kept cats, and chickens were alowed into the kitchen to clean the floor.

We have a lot to learn from our fore-bears.
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Old 30-06-2012, 02:00 PM   #12
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I have a pot in pot and am quite pleased with it. It makes no noise and costs nothing to run and causes little environmental destruction compared to the electric devices. I am not sure what the temperature is but it is quite cool so that milk is still nice after a couple of days. It is best to eat things as fresh as possible in any case. I have used a strap (this is the adjustable type used for tieing furniture to the roofs of cars tied so it like an x when viewed from top or bottom) to tie the inner pot down rather than using sand to prevent it from floating. This increases the reservoir of water so it doesn't need to be topped up as often. I am experimenting with wrapping the outer pot with wet towels and have the idea that a wet woolen blanket might work to insulate the pots but this could be completely wrong although the wet towels have seemed to improve performance. I noticed that the pots were cooling the floor tiles down even tho they were raised slightly off the floor to allow air circulation under the pots. I definately think this is a cool thing to set up to save money and stick it to the system.

Last edited by mightiswrong; 30-06-2012 at 02:16 PM.
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Old 30-06-2012, 03:18 PM   #13
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I came near buying pots to make a Zeer and sometime later I was glad I hadn't done it (yet) because of further information I read from which I gathered the outer pot should be porous and unglazed but that it was okay for the inner pot to be glazed. I'm thinking it might be ideal if the inner pot only has glaze on the inside, but I am not sure if it makes a difference.

Well, here's the reference I gathered from. Pots are quite spendy so if you were to invest for this purpose you'd want to get it right the first time.

I was also thinking that if you had some for growing cilantro it might be good. Once the soil reaches 70 degrees (seventy-some) cilantro will bolt and go to seed and for that reason it is best to grow it in the spring and fall. If the soil could remain cool (cooler) using the Zeer pot method then cilantro plants could probably be grown in the heat of summer without bolting (too soon).

-----------------------

The pot-in-pot refrigerator, also known as a Zeer الزير in Arabic, is a refrigeration device which keeps food cool without electricity by using evaporative cooling. A porous outer earthenware pot, lined with wet sand, contains an inner pot (which can be glazed to prevent penetration by the liquid) within which the food is placed. The evaporation of the outer liquid draws heat from the inner pot.

Although the principle behind the device has been known for centuries, the modern device was developed by lecturer Mohammed Bah Abba for use in modern Nigeria and distributed by his company, Mobah Rural Horizons.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pot-in-pot_refrigerator
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Old 30-06-2012, 03:55 PM   #14
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Awesome thread to bump, and very seasonally appropriate. Thanks, guys!
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Old 01-07-2012, 10:33 PM   #15
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I might have a leak in my inner pot from the way I blocked the hole but there is also condensation forming on the sides of the inner pot that collects in the bottom. I am thinking that if you could get some sort of rubber bung with a tube going out thru the hole in the outer pot it would drain this liquid and give a use for the holes. There is also an issue with accumulation of minerals forming a barrier in the pot so it would be best to use rainwater if possible although you can probably clean and break down these mineral deposits with vinegar. It might help if the inner pot is glazed or even another material that doesn't allow water thru but does conduct the heat out (also a proper seal on the lid would reduce condensation inside). The other thing to note is that these type of devices work better the larger they are (reduced surface area to volume ratio) and that there should be a good gap between the pots.

There is another option I have considered. I was using the very absorbant dish cloths to wrap milk cartons in and then place them in a dish full of water and this proved to be very effective. The material would soak water up by capillary action and cool the milk as it evaporated. These type of washing up cloths could be used to wrap a larger container with a suitable lid. However the pot in pot is probably better since the cloths would probably become smelly.

The idea for the corriander sounds good. Does anyone have any idea what the effect would be of having 4 pots in pots so you would have an outer and and an inner layer of water with an air gap in between?

Last edited by mightiswrong; 01-07-2012 at 11:36 PM.
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Old 20-10-2015, 10:37 PM   #16
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I know this is an old thread, but love the pot in pot refrigerator idea, I just wondered if you could build the outer casing in brick, instead of a porous pot?
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