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Old 22-11-2011, 05:27 PM   #1
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Default a list of good books

on this thread i will start a list of books that are good sources and so will other people
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Old 24-11-2011, 09:53 PM   #2
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some of the good books are of course anything written by david icke i also like books written by jesse ventura and the few books that alex jones has written
some examples are 1. dont start the revolution without me by jesse ventura
2. american conspiracies by jesse ventura 3. 63 documents the government doesnt want you to read by jess ventura and any book by david icke
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Old 26-11-2011, 03:04 PM   #3
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on this thread i will start a list of books that are good sources and so will other people

Already been done, here.

http://forum.davidicke.com/showthread.php?t=2713
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Old 29-11-2011, 03:11 AM   #4
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Arrow The Silmarillion

http://youtu.be/-yyEz_cRGb8

Chapter one Ainulindalë part 1 ...


Ainulindalë part 2 ...


Ainulindalë part 3...

There was Eru, the One, who in Arda is called Ilúvatar; and he made first the Ainur, the Holy Ones, that were the offspring of his thought, and they were with him before aught else was made.


The Ainulindalë...

There was Eru, the One, who in Arda is called Ilúvatar; and he made first the Ainur, the Holy Ones, that were the offspring of his thought, and they were with him before aught else was made. And he spoke to them, propounding to them themes of music; and they sang before him, and he was glad.

He spoke to them, propounding to them themes of music; and they sang before him, and he was glad.

For a long while they sang only each alone, or but few together, while the rest hearkened; for each comprehended only that part of the mind of Ilúvatar from which he came, and in the understanding of their brethren they grew but slowly. Yet ever as they listened they came to deeper understanding, and increased in unison and harmony.

I have kindled you with the Flame Imperishable, ye shall show forth your powers in adorning this theme, each with his own thoughts and devices...

Then Ilúvatar said to them: 'Of the theme that I have declared to you, I will now that ye make in harmony together a Great Music. And since I have kindled you with the Flame Imperishable, ye shall show forth your powers in adorning this theme, each with his own thoughts and devices, if he will. But I will sit and hearken, and be glad that through you great beauty has been wakened into song.'

It seemed at last that there were two musics progressing at one time before the seat of Ilúvatar, and they were utterly at variance. The one was deep and wide and beautiful, but slow and blended with an immeasurable sorrow, from which its beauty chiefly came. The other had now achieved a unity of its own; but it was loud, and vain, and endlessly repeated; and it had little harmony, but rather a clamorous unison as of many trumpets braying upon a few notes. And it essayed to drown the other music by the violence of its voice, but it seemed that its most triumphant notes were taken by the other and woven into its own solemn pattern.

The Ainur know much of what was, and is, and is to come, and few things are unseen by them. Yet some things there are that they cannot see, neither alone nor taking counsel together; for to none but himself has Ilúvatar revealed all that he has in store, and in every age there come forth things that are new and have no foretelling, for they do not proceed from the past.

Now the Children of Ilúvatar are Elves and Men, the Firstborn and the Followers. And amid all the splendours of the World, its vast halls and spaces, and its wheeling fires, Ilúvatar chose a place for their habitation in the Deeps of Time and in the midst of the innumerable stars.

I will send forth into the Void the Flame Imperishable, and it shall be at the heart of the World, and the World shall Be...

'I know the desire of your minds that what ye have seen should verily be, not only in your thought, but even as ye yourselves are, and yet other. Therefore I say: Eä! Let these things Be! And I will send forth into the Void the Flame Imperishable, and it shall be at the heart of the World, and the World shall Be; and those of you that will may go down into it. And suddenly the Ainur saw afar off a light, as it were a cloud with a living heart of flame; and they knew that this was no vision only, but that Ilúvatar had made a new thing: Eä, the World that Is.

Thus it came to pass that of the Ainur some abode still with Ilúvatar beyond the confines of the World; but others, and among them many of the greatest and most fair, took the leave of Ilúvatar and descended into it. But this condition Ilúvatar made, or it is the necessity of their love, that their power should thenceforward be contained and bounded in the World, to be within it for ever, until it is complete, so that they are its life and it is theirs. And therefore they are named the Valar, the Powers of the World.

When the Valar entered into Eä they were at first astounded and at a loss, for it was as if naught was yet made which they had seen in vision, and all was but on point to begin and yet unshaped, and it was dark. For the Great Music had been but the growth and flowering of thought in the Tuneless Halls, and the Vision only a foreshowing; but now they had entered in at the beginning of Time, and the Valar perceived that the World had been but foreshadowed and foresung, and they must achieve it. So began their great labours in wastes unmeasured and unexplored, and in ages uncounted and forgotten, until in the Deeps of Time and in the midst of the vast halls of Eä there came to be that hour and that place where was made the habitation of the Children of Ilúvatar.

And the Valar drew unto them many companions, some less, some well nigh as great as themselves, and they laboured together in the ordering of the Earth and the curbing of its tumults.

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Old 29-11-2011, 03:15 AM   #5
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Arrow Mark of the Beast

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Old 29-11-2011, 04:24 PM   #6
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+1

I love this book so much. I never ever get sick of reading it! Did you read the children of Hurin? If so, what did you think of it?
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L.V 1985-2009 I will never forget you.

"…why should we not calmly and patiently review our own thoughts, and thoroughly examine and see what these appearances in us really are?"
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Old 29-11-2011, 05:18 PM   #7
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Lightbulb The Silmarillion/Valenqenta

The first section of The Silmarillion, Ainulindalë ("The Music of the Ainur"), takes the form of a primary creation narrative. Eru ("The One"), also called Ilúvatar ("Father of All"), first created the Ainur, a group of eternal spirits or demiurges, called "the offspring of his thought". Ilúvatar brought the Ainur together and showed them a theme, from which he bade them make a great music. Melkor—whom Ilúvatar had given the "greatest power and knowledge" of all the Ainur—broke from the harmony of the music to develop his own song. Some Ainur joined him, while others continued to follow Ilúvatar, causing discord in the music. This happened thrice, with Eru Ilúvatar successfully overpowering his subordinate with a new theme each time. Ilúvatar then stopped the music and showed them a vision of Arda and its peoples. The vision disappeared after a while, and Ilúvatar offered the Ainur a chance to enter into Arda and govern over the new world...

Many Ainur descended, taking physical form and becoming bound to that world. The greater Ainur became known as Valar, while the lesser Ainur were called Maiar. The Valar attempted to prepare the world for the coming inhabitants (Elves and Men), while Melkor, who wanted Arda for himself, repeatedly destroyed their work, until, slowly, through waves of destruction and creation, the world took shape...

Valaquenta ("Account of the Valar") describes Melkor and each of the fourteen Valar in detail, as well as a few of the Maiar. It also tells how Melkor seduced many Maiar—including Sauron and the Balrogs—into his service...


http://youtu.be/0nv96F-tSQI

Chapter two: Valenqenta part 1


Chapter two: Valenqenta part 2


Chapter two: Valenqenta part 3

Valaquenta provides a middle-ground and link between Ainulindalë, which stands as Middle-earth's cosmogony or 'creation myth', and Quenta Silmarillion, a collection of mythical histories wherein major events of Middle-earth find their first elaboration (see The Silmarillion).

Not an actual 'story' in itself (there is no plot or action), Valaquenta is more a 'listing' — a kind of expanded footnote giving 'personal' details attached to each of the major divine characters of Tolkien's Middle-earth legendarium. These divine beings are the Valar, the Maiar and the 'Enemies' (the last being equivalent to fallen Ainur of the same kind and order as the Valar/Maiar. For an explanation of the divine natures of all the Ainur, see Ainulindalë).

Just as with the rest of Tolkien's characters, the natures and names of these worldly Ainur are by no means incidental; they are intimately connected with important elements of plot and action in the later tales. To an extent, Valaquenta gives a meaning or a 'genealogy', or both, to many scenes in the larger Quenta Silmarillion; it is a virtual 'list of players' for important parts of that ensuing drama, which drama itself (as a collection of mythic tales) provides a foundational background for the world that comes after (in particular for those stories comprising the more widely known histories of Middle-earth, including The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings).


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+1

I love this book so much. I never ever get sick of reading it! Did you read the children of Hurin? If so, what did you think of it?
First time,a friend recommended it...

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Old 29-11-2011, 06:09 PM   #8
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Lightbulb The Valaquenta

In the beginning Eru, the One, who in the Elvish tongue is named Ilúvatar, made the Ainur of his thought; and they made a great Music before him. In this Music the World was begun; for Ilúvatar made visible the song of the Ainur, and they beheld it as a light in the darkness. And many among them became enamoured of its beauty, and of its history which they saw beginning and unfolding as in a vision. Therefore Ilúvatar gave to their vision Being, and set it amid the Void, and the Secret Fire was sent to burn at the heart of the World; and it was called Eä.

Those of the Ainur who desired it arose and entered into the World at the beginning of Time; and it was their task to achieve it, and by their labours to fulfil the vision which they had seen. Long they laboured in the regions of Eä, which are vast beyond the thought of Elves and Men, until in the time appointed was made Arda, the Kingdom of Earth. Then they put on the raiment of Earth and descended into it, and dwelt therein.

The Great among these spirits the Elves name the Valar, the Powers of Arda, and Men have often called them gods.

Last of all is set the name of Melkor, He who arises in Might. But that name he has forfeited...

Last of all is set the name of Melkor, He who arises in Might. But that name he has forfeited; and the Noldor, who among the Elves suffered most from his malice, will not utter it, and they name him Morgoth, the Dark Enemy of the World.

From splendour he fell through arrogance to contempt for all things save himself, a spirit wasteful and pitiless. Understanding he turned to subtlety in perverting to his own will all that he would use, until he became a liar without shame. He began with the desire of Light, but when he could not possess it for himself alone, he descended through fire and wrath into a great burning, down into Darkness. And darkness he used most in his evil works upon Arda, and filled it with fear for all living things.

Among those of his servants that have names the greatest was that spirit whom the Eldar called Sauron, or Gorthaur the Cruel.


I have kindled you with the Flame Imperishable, ye shall show forth your powers in adorning this theme, each with his own thoughts and devices...
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Old 29-11-2011, 11:13 PM   #9
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Arrow THE SPEAR by James Herbert



Harry Steadman is a British security consultant and private investigator who, depsite not being Jewish, used to work for Mossad. When one of their agents goes missing in England, he's reluctantly drawn into the search, only to stumble upon a mystical Nazi order of MPs, high-ranking military officers, and wealthy industrialists. Their otherworldly power derives mostly from the eponymous relic--none other than the Lance of Longinus that pierced Christ's side as he expired on the cross...


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Old 24-12-2011, 07:15 PM   #10
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i know its been done but i wanted to start a new one
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Old 24-12-2011, 07:17 PM   #11
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another good author is george orwell especially 1984
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Old 24-12-2011, 07:27 PM   #12
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Lightbulb Big Brother Little Brother

By artificially creating fear and hate of an enemy, the actual existence of which is never made completely certain, the governments provided an excuse for their failures and, in the case of Oceania, enforced obedience to Big Brother.



Moreover, eternal war formed the bedrock of the economy, as people could be kept busy manufacturing goods that would not improve their living standards, but would instead be destroyed on the battlefields. Thus perpetual war not only kept the population busy, it also encouraged a "siege mentality" in which hatred of the enemy and love for the government's protection were social norms...


Alan Watt Discusses The "Psychological Warfare" Being Waged Against Americans on Alex Jones Tv 1/6 ...

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...otocollage.jpg

I tell you Winston, that reality is not external. Reality exists in the human mind, and nowhere else. Not in the individual mind, which can make mistakes, and in any case soon perishes: only in the mind of the party, which is collective and immortal. Whatever the party holds to be truth, is truth. It is impossible to see reality except by looking through the eyes of the Party...

The Party seeks power entirely for its own sake. We are not interested in the good of others; we are interested solely in power. Not wealth or luxury or long life or happiness: only power, pure power. What pure power means you will understand presently. We are different from all the oligarchies of the past, in that we know what we are doing. All the others, even those who resembled ourselves, were cowards and hypocrites...

Perpetual war refers to a lasting state of war with no clear ending conditions. It also describes a situation of ongoing tension that seems likely to escalate at any moment, similar to the Cold War...


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Old 24-12-2011, 08:45 PM   #13
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Lightbulb Room 101(From Me to You)

Room 101 is a place introduced in the novel Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell. It is a torture chamber in the Ministry of Love in which the Party attempts to subject a prisoner to his or her own worst nightmare, fear or phobia...


You asked me once, what was in Room 101. I told you that you knew the answer already. Everyone knows it. The thing that is in Room 101 is the worst thing in the world...




http://forum.davidicke.com/showthrea...185800&page=20

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Old 24-12-2011, 09:00 PM   #14
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Lightbulb Tibetan Book of the Dead



Walter Yeeling Evans-Wentz (February 2, 1878 – July 17, 1965) was an anthropologist and writer who was a pioneer in the study of Tibetan Buddhism.

He was born as Walter Yeeling Wentz in Trenton, New Jersey, and as a teenager read Madame Blavatsky's Isis Unveiled and The Secret Doctrine and became interested in the teachings of Theosophy. He received both his B.A. and M.A. from Stanford University, where he studied with William James and William Butler Yeats. He then studied Celtic mythology and folklore at Jesus College, Oxford (1907); there he added his mother's Welsh surname Evans to his name, being known henceforth as Evans-Wentz. He travelled extensively, spending time in Mexico, Europe, and the Far East. He spent the years of the First World War in Egypt. He later travelled to Sri Lanka (then Ceylon) and India, reaching Darjeeling in 1919; there he encountered Tibetan religious texts firsthand.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Evans-Wentz

http://forum.davidicke.com/showthrea...=133148&page=4

http://forum.davidicke.com/showthrea...111364&page=25

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Old 31-12-2011, 09:03 PM   #15
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Lightbulb Herman Hesse

The story begins by painting a picture of Siddhartha as a perfect son: smart, athletic, obedient, and handsome. However, he eventually sees the limitations of the Brahmin life, and leaves his home to join the ascetics with his companion Govinda. The two set out in the search of enlightenment. After seeing the limitation of asceticism, the two journey to meet the Buddha. Govinda is immediately impressed and takes refuge in the Buddha. Siddhartha respects the Buddha's enlightenment, but realizes that no teaching, not even the Buddha's, can capture enlightenment.



The word Siddhartha derives from two words in the Sanskrit language, siddha (achieved) + artha (meaning or wealth). The two words together mean "he who has found meaning (of existence)" or "he who has attained his goals"


Experience is the aggregate of conscious events experienced by a human in life – it connotes participation, learning and knowledge. Understanding is deep comprehension and internalization. In Hesse’s novel Siddhartha, experience is shown as the best way to approach understanding of reality to attain enlightenment. Hesse’s crafting of Siddhartha’s journey shows that understanding is attained not through scholastic, mind-dependent methods, nor through immersing oneself in asceticism or love and the carnal pleasures of the world. While these individual events only bring about more samsara, they cannot be considered distractions because it is the totality of these experiences that allow Siddhartha to attain understanding.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siddhartha_(novel)

http://forum.davidicke.com/showthrea...133148&page=10
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Old 02-04-2012, 12:22 AM   #16
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Lightbulb Les mystères du château de Lusignan



The mysteries of the castle of Lusignan is indeed one of the best-selling children's literature of the 1930s. It tells the sad legend of the beautiful fairy Melusine, beloved wife of then betrayed Raymondin of Lusignan, and the story of his appearances over the centuries when his descendants are in danger. It says especially the history of the Countess Matilda of Lusignan, who heads his domain only Poitevin while her husband is held off to the Crusades. A beautiful page, a child, a traitor, subways, a treasure, a sad fairy and helpful ...



Melusine is sometimes used as a heraldic figure, typically in German Coats of arms, where she supports one scaly tail in each arm. She may appear crowned. The Coat of Arms of Warsaw features a siren (identified in Polish as a syrenka) very much like a depiction of Melusine, brandishing a sword and shield. She is the water-spirit from the Vistula who identified the proper site for the city to Boreslaus of Masovia in the late 13th century...



The most famous literary version of Melusine tales, that of Jean d'Arras, compiled about 1382–1394, was worked into a collection of "spinning yarns" as told by ladies at their spinning. Coudrette (Couldrette) wrote The Romans of Partenay or of Lusignen: Otherwise known as the Tale of Melusine, giving source and historical notes, dates and background of the story. He goes in to detail and depth about the relationship of Melusine and Raymondin, their initial meeting and the complete story...Jean d'Arras was a 15th century North French poet-composer (trouvere) of whom little is known...He collaborated with Antoine du Val and Fouquart de Cambrai in putting together a collection of stories entitled L'Évangile des quenouilles ("The spinners' gospel").


http://forum.davidicke.com/showthrea...t=96009&page=5

http://forum.davidicke.com/showpost....&postcount=251

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Old 19-12-2012, 06:17 PM   #17
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Lightbulb M Peas

Dr. Benedict Lambert is a molecular biologist who led his class at Oxford University. He is the great-great-great nephew of Gregor Mendel, the father of genetics and he was born with achondroplasia, a condition in which the cartilage at the ends of the long bones does not develop properly, causing dwarfism. Despite his dwarfism, Lambert—as he indicates is true of all with his condition—has normal sexual organs and desires, and he eventually manages an exhausting affair with a young married woman who is enduring a difficult marriage. Their relationship concludes tragically for all concerned..
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HXbqL...ature=youtu.be

Author Simon Mawer develops Lambert’s story with great skill in MENDEL’S DWARF, alternating its stages with vignettes from the career of Gregor Mendel, the Austrian monk whose brilliant work— unacknowledged in his lifetime—enabled Lambert’s own career and his obsession with the genetic roots of his achondroplasia. Mawer provides for Mendel his own bittersweet romance with a married woman, a tender, Chekhovian romance that always remains confined to silences and flushed cheeks but competes with Lambert’s story for the reader’s interest.



Quote:
In the mid-19th century, Austrian monk Gregor Mendel's observations of pea pods led to the principles of Mendelian genetics, the foundation of modern genetics. He ended up growing and examining about 27,000 pea plants in the course of his experiments. Mendel chose peas for his experiments because he could grow them easily, develop pure-bred strains, protect them from cross-pollination, and control their pollination. Mendel cross-bred tall & dwarf pea plants, green & yellow peas, purple & white flowers, wrinkled & smooth peas, and a few other traits. He then observed the resulting offspring. In each of these cases, one trait is dominant and all the offspring, or Filial-1 generation, showed the dominant trait. Then he crossed members of the F1 generation together and observed their offspring, the Filial-2 generation. The F2 plants had the dominant trait in approximately a 3:1 ratio. Mendel reasoned that each parent had a 'vote' in the appearance of the offspring and the non-dominant or recessive trait appeared only when it was inherited from both parents. He did further experiments that showed each trait is separately inherited. Unwittingly, Mendel had solved a major problem with Charles Darwin's theory of evolution: how could new traits be preserved and not blended back into the population? But Darwin never learned about it...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mFbho5zUVdQ

Mawer is himself an Oxford-trained zoologist, and he provides mini-lectures, complete with footnotes and illustrations, to summarize Mendel’s experiments and to clarify just what Lambert is up to in his laboratory work. Mawer sneers at students of genetics and studies of IQ, asserting that “Genes code for protein. They don’t do anything else, and there simply isn’t any protein with a domain marked ’intelligence’.” He backhands biologist Trofim Lysenko (an easy target) and reports that DNA screening reveals that “something like ten percent of the children of happily married couples have in fact been fathered by ... a different male.”..The name "marrowfat pea" for mature dried peas is recorded by the Oxford English Dictionary as early as 1733. The fact that an export cultivar popular in Japan is called Maro has led some people to assume that the English name "marrowfat" is derived from Japanese. In the United Kingdom, dried, rehydrated and mashed marrowfat peas, known by the public as mushy peas..

http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showp...6&postcount=19
http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showp...6&postcount=74
http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showp...&postcount=105
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