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Old 17-10-2010, 09:13 AM   #1
nosferatu_dj
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Default Wikileaks to release 400,000 Iraq war files

http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2...section=justin

Wikileaks to release 400,000 Iraq war files

By Middle East correspondent Anne Barker
Posted 11 hours 29 minutes ago
Wikileaks is preparing to release as many as 400,000 sensitive files (wikileaks.org)


The whistleblower website Wikileaks is expected to release hundreds of thousands of secret military files.
It is understood Wikileaks is preparing to release as many as 400,000 sensitive intelligence files relating to the US-led war in Iraq.
The files have been leaked to the whistleblower website from an unconfirmed source.
The Pentagon has begun scouring through its own Iraq war databases to prepare for the fallout and has reportedly set up a 120-person taskforce to assess the possible impact.
The release, if it goes ahead, would eclipse the recent publication of more than 70,000 classified US military files on the war in Afghanistan, which caused an outcry in Washington.
The US has urged Wikileaks to return the new documents to the US military.
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Old 17-10-2010, 09:34 AM   #2
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IF THE USA WAS NOT INVOLVED IN SUCH DIRTY/UNDERHANDED THINGS,THEY WOULDNT HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT THE INFO GETTING OUT NOW WOULD THEY?


Im surprised Wikileaks is still up though,you would have thought they would have killed the site long ago for doing this!

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Old 17-10-2010, 09:43 AM   #3
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the cia must be desperate now
nobody biting for a stupid war
wikileaks dont deserve any time
we all know the cia nazis run
mostly on warcrimes

but one things for sure
going to get the back up of
our taliban cousins
and be a good recruiting tool
they are playing us ALL LIKE FOOLS

the good people of this land
and all the other western nations
WE NEED A DELAGATION
of peace and truth loving
that dont belong to hitler youth organisations

we need to go on tour to eastern lands
with no fear and love in our hearts
hell we are all related anyway
peace and love are the only chance
to win the day from the bloodlines of cain
and the false flag hell is insane

cos I would love the opportunity to
say to many of the east’s leaders
they done a number on you too
got you worshipping a new religion
the one of the US dollar bill

has anyone seen the graph showing
all that American debt?
they are raping most of the world
Russia and china the only exceptions

And the way I see it is that a delegation
Of good people from every nation
Demand to see the finance ministry
And could show them what was going on

If only every country stopped lending
We got the cia just where we want them
Would be an easy way to userp the cia
Cos with noone lending, only the devil would
Cut back social spending, in favour of insanity
Now what’s for tea?

mwah xxxxxxxx


Quote:
Originally Posted by nosferatu_dj View Post
http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2...section=justin

Wikileaks to release 400,000 Iraq war files

By Middle East correspondent Anne Barker
Posted 11 hours 29 minutes ago
Wikileaks is preparing to release as many as 400,000 sensitive files (wikileaks.org)


The whistleblower website Wikileaks is expected to release hundreds of thousands of secret military files.
It is understood Wikileaks is preparing to release as many as 400,000 sensitive intelligence files relating to the US-led war in Iraq.
The files have been leaked to the whistleblower website from an unconfirmed source.
The Pentagon has begun scouring through its own Iraq war databases to prepare for the fallout and has reportedly set up a 120-person taskforce to assess the possible impact.
The release, if it goes ahead, would eclipse the recent publication of more than 70,000 classified US military files on the war in Afghanistan, which caused an outcry in Washington.
The US has urged Wikileaks to return the new documents to the US military.
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Old 17-10-2010, 02:58 PM   #4
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has anyone seen the graph showing
all that American debt?
they are raping most of the world
Russia and china the only exceptions




CIA - Criminals in action.

What changes?

Or can I say "What will we change".
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Old 17-10-2010, 07:30 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dolores1 View Post
has anyone seen the graph showing
all that American debt?
they are raping most of the world
Russia and china the only exceptions




CIA - Criminals in action.

What changes?

Or can I say "What will we change".
jesus conciousness almost upon us
but the choice of the new master jesus
will suprise so many

peace x
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Old 18-10-2010, 10:00 AM   #6
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http://www.physorg.com/news/2010-10-...wikileaks.html

Pentagon bracing for new WikiLeaks release

October 18, 2010 by Olivia Hampton Enlarge
The homepage of the WikiLeaks website. The Pentagon scoured through an Iraq war database Monday to prepare for potential fallout from an expected release by WikiLeaks of some 400,000 secret military reports.
The Pentagon scoured through an Iraq war database Monday to prepare for potential fallout from an expected release by WikiLeaks of some 400,000 secret military reports.



The massive release, possibly early this week, is set to dwarf the whistleblower website's publication of 77,000 classified US military documents on the war in Afghanistan in July, including the names of Afghan informants and other details from raw intelligence reports. Another 15,000 are due out soon.
In order to prepare for the anticipated release of sensitive intelligence on the US-led Iraq war, officials set up a 120-person taskforce several weeks ago to comb through the database and "determine what the possible impacts might be," said Colonel David Lapan, a Pentagon spokesman.
The Department of Defense is concerned the leak compiles "significant activities" from the war, which include incidents such as known attacks against coalition troops, Iraqi security forces, civilians or infrastructure in the country.
The data was culled from an Iraq-based database that contained "significant acts, unit-level reporting, tactical reports, things of that nature," said Lapan, noting that Pentagon officials still do not know how many and which documents would be released.
He urged WikiLeaks to return the documents to the US military, which he said found no need to redact them in the interim.
"Our position is redactions don't help, it's returning the documents to their rightful owner," Lapan said.

Enlarge
US soldiers guard a detained Iraqi suspected of ties to Al-Qaeda on the southern outskirts of Baghdad, in 2007. The Department of Defense is concerned a new WikiLeaks leak compiles "significant activities" from the war, which include incidents such as known attacks against coalition troops, Iraqi security forces, civilians or infrastructure in the country.
"We don't believe WikiLeaks or others have the expertise needed. It's not as simple as just taking out names. There are other things and documents that aren't names that are also potentially damaging." For the Iraq leak, Wikileaks is believed to be teaming up with the same news outlets as it did for the Afghanistan document dump -- The New York Times, Britain's Guardian and Der Spiegel of Germany -- and Newsweek magazine has reported that all partners would release the material simultaneously.
The July release caused uproar in the US government, with director of National Intelligence James Clapper and former CIA director Michael Hayden warning it could undermine the post-9/11 effort to break down walls between rival intelligence agencies.

Difficulties in sharing intelligence information have been repeatedly identified as a problem plaguing spy and law enforcement services since the attacks of September 11, 2001.
In a speech this month, Clapper said President Barack Obama was full of "angst" over a "hemorrhage" of leaks of sensitive intelligence from government officials.
"I think it's going to have a very chilling effect on the need to share," he said.
WikiLeaks has not identified the source of the documents it has released so far but suspicion has fallen on Bradley Manning, a US Army intelligence analyst who is in military custody.
Manning was arrested in May following the release by WikiLeaks of video footage of a US Apache helicopter strike in Iraq in which civilians died, and he has been charged with delivering defense information to an unauthorized source.
Launched in 2006, WikiLeaks is facing internal troubles amid criticism its releases harm US national security and an ongoing investigation into its founder, Julian Assange, over an alleged sex crime in Sweden.
It also has some money problems.
Assange told The Guardian that British firm Moneybookers, an online payment company it uses to collect donations, closed his website's account in August after the US and Australian governments blacklisted WikiLeaks in the days following the initial release of Afghan documents.
The website has been undergoing "scheduled maintenance" since September 29, but promises to "be back online as soon as possible."
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Old 18-10-2010, 10:09 AM   #7
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http://www.news.com.au/technology/mi...-1225940000869

Missing weapons, ethnic cleansing details may be part of Wikileaks' 400,000 Iraq War files


  • By AFP and staff writers
  • From: AFP
  • October 18, 2010 8:46AM
  • 60 comments




Where did the deadliest weapon of choice for insurgents - the IED - originate? WikiLeaks may have the answer / AP Source: AP



  • New release likely tonight
  • Five times bigger than Afghan leak
  • Founder Assange under siege

THE Pentagon is scouring an Iraq war database to prepare for potential fallout from an expected release by WikiLeaks of some 400,000 secret military reports.

Officials set up the taskforce several weeks ago in order to prepare for tonight's anticipated release of sensitive intelligence on the US-led Iraq war.
They have been told to comb through the database and "determine what the possible impacts might be", Pentagon spokesman Colonel David Lapan said.
The Department of Defense is concerned the leak compiles "significant activities" from the war, or SIGACTS, which include incidents such as known attacks against coalition troops, Iraqi security forces, civilians or infrastructure in the country.
The data was culled from an Iraq-based database that contained "significant acts, unit-level reporting, tactical reports, things of that nature," Col Lapan said.



He noted that Pentagon officials did not know how many and which documents would be released.
The massive release is set to dwarf the whistleblower website's publication of 77,000 classified US military documents on the war in Afghanistan in July, including the names of Afghan informants and other details from raw intelligence reports.
Another 15,000 are due out soon.
That release, while gaining enormous media coverage and publicity for Wikileaks and its Australian founder Julian Assange, was largely ignored by a war-weary public.
However, aside from the further unrest it could ignite in Iraq and added discomfort for the 50,000 US troops and diplomats still stationed there, the Iraq files have much more explosive potential than the Afghanistan release.
Wired has pinpointed several areas of interest, such as the possibility of Iran's involvement in developing Improvised Explosive Devices, the loss of 200,000 US rifles and pistols in 2007 and evidence of ethnic cleansing.
Col Lapan urged WikiLeaks to return the documents to the US military, which he said found no need to redact them in the interim.
"Our position is redactions don't help, it's returning the documents to their rightful owner," he said.
"We don't believe WikiLeaks or others have the expertise needed.
"It's not as simple as just taking out names. There are other things and documents that aren't names that are also potentially damaging."
For the Iraq leak, Wikileaks is believed to be teaming up with the same news outlets as it did for the Afghanistan document dump - The New York Times, Britain's Guardian and Der Spiegel of Germany.
Newsweek magazine has reported that all partners would release the material simultaneously.
The July release caused uproar in the US government, with Director of National Intelligence James Clapper and former CIA director Michael Hayden warning it could undermine the post-9/11 effort to break down walls between rival intelligence agencies.
Difficulties in sharing intelligence information have been repeatedly identified as a problem plaguing spy and law enforcement services since the attacks of September 11, 2001.
In a speech earlier this month, Mr Clapper said President Barack Obama was full of "angst" over a "haemorrhage" of leaks of sensitive intelligence from government officials.
"I think it's going to have a very chilling effect on the need to share," he said.
WikiLeaks has not identified the source of the documents it has released so far but suspicion has fallen on Bradley Manning, a US Army intelligence analyst who is currently in military custody.
Manning was arrested in May following the release by WikiLeaks of video footage of a US Apache helicopter strike in Iraq in which civilians died, and he has been charged with delivering defense information to an unauthorised source.
Launched in 2006, WikiLeaks is facing internal troubles amid criticism its releases harm US national security and an ongoing investigation into its founder, Julian Assange, over an alleged sex crime in Sweden.
It also has some money problems.
Assange told The Guardian that British firm Moneybookers, an online payment company it uses to collect donations, closed his website's account in August after the US and Australian governments blacklisted WikiLeaks in the days following the initial release of Afghan documents.
The website has been undergoing "scheduled maintenance" since September 29, but promises to "be back online as soon as possible."

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Old 18-10-2010, 10:10 AM   #8
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http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/201...ikileaks-iraq/

Will 400,000 Secret Iraq War Documents Restore WikiLeaks’ Sheen?



After a brief quiescence, the secret-spilling website WikiLeaks is about to explode again onto the global stage with the impending release of almost 400,000 secret U.S. Army reports from the Iraq War, marking the largest military leak in U.S. history.
Measured by size, the database will dwarf the 92,000-entry Afghan war log WikiLeaks partially published last July. “It will be huge,” says a source familiar with WikiLeaks’ operations, who spoke on condition of anonymity. Former WikiLeaks staffers say the document dump was at one time scheduled for Monday, October 18, though the publication date may well have been moved since then. Some large media outlets were provided an embargoed copy of the database in August.
In Washington, the Pentagon is bracing for the impact. The Defense Department believes the leak is a compilation of the “Significant Activities,” or SIGACTS, reports from the Iraq War, and officials have assembled a 120-person taskforce that’s been scouring the database to prepare for the leak, according to spokesman Col. Dave Lapan.

Superbombs and Secret Jails: What to Look for in WikiLeaks’ Iraq Docs
The Afghanistan war logs were just the beginning. Coming as early as next week, WikiLeaks plans to disclose a new trove of military documents, this time covering some of the toughest years of the Iraq war. Up to 400,000 reports from 2004 to 2009 could be revealed this time — five times the size of the Afghan document dump.
It’s a perilous time in Iraq. Politicians are stitching together a new government. U.S. troops are supposed to leave by next December.
Pentagon leaders were furious over the Afghanistan documents, but the American public largely greeted them with yawns. Iraqis might not be so sanguine.
It’s hard to imagine Iraq will fall back into widespread chaos over the disclosures. But they can’t be good for the United States, as it tries to create a new postwar relationship with Iraq, or for the 50,000 U.S. troops and diplomats still over there.
We don’t know what’s in the documents. But here’s what we’ll be looking to find in the trove — and some unanswered questions that the documents might address.
Continue reading on Danger Room …

“They’ve been doing that analysis for some time and have been providing information to Central Command and to our allies, so that they could prepare for a possible impact of the release [and] could take appropriate steps,” says Lapan. “There are … things that could be contained in the documents that could be harmful to operations, to sources and methods.”
The Iraq release comes at a crucial time for the 4-year-old WikiLeaks, which has been rankled by internal conflict, shaken by outside criticism and knocked off-message by a lingering sex-crime investigation of its founder, Julian Assange, in Sweden. At least half-a-dozen staffers have resigned from the organization in recent weeks, including key technical staff, according to four ex-staffers interviewed by Wired.com. A “scheduled maintenance” of the WikiLeaks website that began September 29 has stretched to more than two weeks.
The beleaguered Assange was cautious in a Sept. 30 public debate at City University in London, where he asked organizers to bar attending journalists and students from recording, photographing or videotaping his appearance.
The controversies dogging the site followed a string of triumphs: a series of high-profile leaks aimed at U.S. and NATO war efforts. In April, the site published a highly controversial classified video of a 2007 Army helicopter attack in Baghdad.
The attack killed two Reuters employees and an unarmed Iraqi man who stumbled onto the scene and tried to rescue one of the wounded. The man’s two children suffered serious injuries in the hail of gunfire. WikiLeaks titled the video “Collateral Murder,” and raised $150,000 from supporters in two days following its release.
Then in July, the site published the Afghan logs, generating headlines around the world. But WikiLeaks’ handling of that release garnered its first widespread criticism from ideological allies. Although the organization withheld 15,000 records from publication to redact the names of Afghan informants who might be at risk of Taliban reprisal, names of some collaborators were still found in the thousands of documents that were published.
Although there’s no evidence that anyone has suffered harm as a result of the names being exposed, WikiLeaks’ handling of the matter drew criticism from human rights organizations and the international free press group Reporters Without Borders, which accused the site of being reckless. Not surprisingly, the Pentagon was also displeased and issued formal demands that WikiLeaks “return” all classified documents in its possession.
Undaunted, Assange secretly inked deals with media outlets in several countries in August to provide them with embargoed access to the much larger database of Iraq War documents, according to ex-staffers. The agreements created strife inside WikiLeaks.
Former Icelandic WikiLeaks volunteer Herbert Snorrason told Wired.com last month that he was alarmed by the aggressive timetable for the release, which provided WikiLeaks’ volunteers too little time to redact the names of U.S. collaborators and informants in Iraq.
“The release date which was established was completely unrealistic,” said 25-year-old Snorrason. “We found out that the level of redactions performed on the Afghanistan documents was not sufficient. I announced that if the next batch did not receive full attention, I would not be willing to cooperate.”
Wired.com was not able to determine what, if any, portion of the Iraq database WikiLeaks plans to withhold from its website.
Another criticism behind the recent resignations from WikiLeaks is the charge that Assange has neglected hundreds or thousands of small, regionally important leaks submitted from around the world, in favor of headline-making leaks targeting the U.S. government. The Iraq War log, says former WikiLeaks spokesman Daniel Domscheit-Berg, would continue that focus. Although publication of the documents will likely garner praise from WikiLeaks supporters, it won’t fix the problems that are endemic to the organization, he says.
“It might distract from the issues at hand for a bit if it happens,” says Domscheit-Berg. “But it doesn’t change a thing about the situation. WikiLeaks is supposed to be more than those releases. I think it might rejuvenate WikiLeaks if WikiLeaks started to pump out all those others docs that are waiting.”
In addition to the potential impact publication of the war log will have on the U.S., NATO allies and the nascent Iraqi government, it could also jolt the pending court martial case against Army Pfc. Bradley Manning.
Bradley Manning (Facebook.com)

Manning, a 23-year-old former Army intelligence analyst, was arrested last May after confessing to a former hacker that he’d supplied WikiLeaks with classified videos and documents, including the “Collateral Murder” video, and a database of 260,000 State Department diplomatic cables.
It was Manning’s online chats with former hacker Adrian Lamo — who turned him in to authorities — that provided the first indication that WikiLeaks possessed the Iraq log. Manning described leaking a database of half-a-million reports from the Iraq War dated from 2004 through 2009, which he said included date stamps of events, latitude and longitude, and casualty figures.
The Army formally charged Manning with the “Collateral Murder” leak in July, and the Pentagon describes him as a “person of interest” in the Afghan war log leak, though Manning did not mention leaking a database of events from the Afghan war.
His attorney did not return a phone call for this story.
Manning is being held in solitary confinement in the Marine Corps brig at Quantico, Virginia. Assange has never confirmed that Manning was a source of leaked data to WikiLeaks, but has pledged financial assistance for Manning’s criminal defense, which supporters estimate could cost $100,000.
The non-profit Wau Holland Foundation in Germany, which manages the bulk of WikiLeaks’ contributions, confirmed to Wired.com that Assange has authorized the release of money for Manning’s defense, but did not provide any other details. In all, WikiLeaks has about $1 million in contributions in its coffers.

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Old 18-10-2010, 10:12 AM   #9
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http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010...eaks-iraq-docs

Superbombs and Secret Jails: What to Look for in WikiLeaks’ Iraq Docs



The Afghanistan war logs were just the beginning. Coming as early as next week, WikiLeaks plans to disclose a new trove of military documents, this time covering some of the toughest years of the Iraq war. Up to 400,000 reports from 2004 to 2009 could be revealed this time — five times the size of the Afghan document dump.
It’s a perilous time in Iraq. Politicians are stitching together a new government. U.S. troops are supposed to leave by next December.
Pentagon leaders were furious over the Afghanistan documents, but the American public largely greeted them with yawns. Iraqis might not be so sanguine.
It’s hard to imagine Iraq will fall back into widespread chaos over the disclosures. But they can’t be good for the United States, as it tries to create a new postwar relationship with Iraq, or for the 50,000 U.S. troops and diplomats still over there.
Will 400,000 Secret Iraq War Documents Restore WikiLeaks’ Sheen?
After a brief quiescence, the secret-spilling website WikiLeaks is about to explode again onto the global stage with the impending release of almost 400,000 secret U.S. Army reports from the Iraq War, marking the largest military leak in U.S. history.
Measured by size, the database will dwarf the 92,000-entry Afghan war log WikiLeaks partially published last July. “It will be huge,” says a source familiar with WikiLeaks’ operations, who spoke on condition of anonymity. Former WikiLeaks staffers say the document dump was at one time scheduled for Monday, October 18, though the publication date may well have been moved since then. Some large media outlets were provided an embargoed copy of the database in August.
In Washington, the Pentagon is bracing for the impact. The Defense Department believes the leak is a compilation of the “Significant Activities,” or SIGACTS, reports from the Iraq War, and officials have assembled a 120-person taskforce that’s been scouring the database to prepare for the leak, according to spokesman Col. Dave Lapan.
“They’ve been doing that analysis for some time and have been providing information to Central Command and to our allies, so that they could prepare for a possible impact of the release [and] could take appropriate steps,” says Lapan. “There are … things that could be contained in the documents that could be harmful to operations, to sources and methods.”
Continue reading on Threat Level …

We don’t know what’s in the documents. But here’s what we’ll be looking to find in the trove — and some unanswered questions that the documents might address.
The Rise of Roadside Bombs

Iraq is more a war. It was a proving ground for today’s signature weapon: the improvised explosive device. Insurgents raided Iraq’s military weapons silos to jury-rig devices set off by a simple cellphone.
Later, they bent bomb casings into cones to form the deadlier Explosively Formed Projectile, essentially a bomb that shoots a jet of molten metal into and through an armored vehicle.
Conflicting reports credited the “superbombs” to Iran, or not. Look to the WikiLeaked documents for supporting evidence either way.
Early on, the military found that its jammers — devices emitting frequencies to block those believed to detonate bombs — didn’t work. Worse, rumor was the jammers actually set the bombs off themselves.
We could be about to learn a lot more about how U.S. forces endured the first new bomb threat of the 21st century.
Abu Ghraib and Missing Jails

The Abu Ghraib detainee-abuse scandal was one of the worst strategic debacles in recent U.S. history. Aides to Gen. David Petraeus candidly said it inspired foreign fighters to join the Iraq insurgency.
Only one prison scandal came to light after Abu Ghraib: torture at the Special Ops facility known as “Camp Nama.” But journalists lost visibility into how the United States ran its detention complex in Iraq. Only in 2007, when Petraeus put Maj. Gen. Doug Stone in charge of rehabbing captured insurgents, did any sunlight return.
What happened for three years in the U.S. jails where tens of thousands of Iraqis were held?
Lost U.S. Guns

The Government Accountability Office reported in 2007 that the military had simply lost nearly 200,000 AK-47s and pistols it intended for Iraqi soldiers and police. Its documentation was a mess in 2004 and ‘05, when Petraeus ran the training mission. Many of those guns are believed to have made their way to the black market and to insurgents.
The leaks may shed some light on how thousands of guns fell off the back of a truck.

Ethnic Cleansing of Baghdad

Shiite death squads and Sunni insurgents each preyed on the other side’s civilians in 2005 and 2006. More than a million Baghdadis were displaced from their homes in a massive demographic shift between March 2006 and July 2007.
It’s never been clear how much the U.S. military knew about the cleansing. Low-level units watched it happen. And American psychological-operations troops certainly played on the religious splits to win local support.
But Gen. George Casey, then the top general in Iraq and now the Army’s chief of staff, has never answered questions about it. If the logs document the cleansing, he may have to speak up.
Drones

As much as the air war in Iraq became defined by the “Shock and Awe” bombing raids of its opening salvo, from the start there were at least ten types of unmanned planes the United States used for surveillance — from the Marines’ Dragon Eye to the Air Force’s iconic Predator.
But how did they prove their value to soldiers and Marines in Iraq? Gen. Petraeus says drones were crucial to the spring 2008 battle in Sadr City, finding targets for the troops below. And a secret task force used drone-fired missiles to kill bomb-planting insurgents.
What other spy gear was employed? Bob Woodward claims a “secret weapon” helped turned the war’s tide.
Could we see hints of it in the new WikiLeaks?
The Air War And More ‘Collateral Murders’

WikiLeaks makes no apologies for its antiwar agenda. Its Iraq and Afghanistan disclosures are designed to weaken support for both wars.
That’s why we should expect to see a lot more material like its gruesome April video showing an Apache helicopter killing people — including a Reuters photographer — who didn’t threaten its crew. The video suggests that other combat aircraft in the confusing urban environments of Iraq might have also engaged in similar mistargeting.
If there are accounts of civilian casualties from what used to be an intense, violent air war — including, perhaps, hidden military documentation about the so-called “Collateral Murder” incident — WikiLeaks is going to publish them.
Photo: Defense Department

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Old 18-10-2010, 10:13 AM   #10
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http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news...-1225939878996

Wikileaks prepares to publish 400,000 secret reports on Iraq


Wikileaks is today expected to release 400,000 secret files on Iraq, dwarfing the whistleblower's hugely controversial dump of Afghanistan documents.

The website is expected to disseminate the information simultaneously through a selected newspaper in Britain, another in Germany and a third in the United States in an operation that has been planned for weeks.
The hoard of classified information is more than four times the size of the material on the war in Afghanistan that WikiLeaks published in July through the same media outlets. That move triggered widespread condemnation because of fears that it endangered the lives of hundreds of Afghans who gave information to the US-led military by revealing their names and where they live.
Robert Gates, the US Defence Secretary, voiced this concern in a letter written to Senator Carl Levin, the chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, in August, which came to light in US media reports over the weekend. Mr Gates also concluded, however, that the release of some 70,000 classified documents did not reveal sensitive information.


A Pentagon spokesman said last night that the timing of the leak remained unclear but the department was ready for it happening as early as today or tomorrow. Other sources, however, said it might not happen for at least another week.
Before the publication of the Iraq files - which look set to be even more revealing than the Afghan data - the Pentagon set up a 120-strong team to determine the potential implications and fallout.
It was unclear whether the MoD had taken similar pre-emptive measures. In response to a question on the expected publication of the Iraq material, an MoD spokesman said: "We condemn all unauthorised releases of classified material."
The US has urged WikiLeaks to return the information, arguing that it poses a risk to national security.
The documents are expected to be released simultaneously by The New York Times, The Guardian and Der Spiegel, the same organisations that released the Afghanistan "War Logs".
WikiLeaks, which says it is a non-profit organisation funded by human rights campaigners, journalists and the general public, justified the release of the Afghan papers in the interests of documenting the history of the war. Julian Assange, the website's founder, claimed that all the documents had been checked for named informants and that 15,000 such files had been held back.
Controversy has dogged Mr Assange and his website since the release of the Afghanistan files. He was accused of rape and harassment in Sweden, with the investigation of the rape claims dropped and then revived in the space of a week. Mr Assange denied the allegations, saying that sex with the women was consensual. But the fallout has been damaging, with several key players on WikiLeaks resigning after the allegations surfaced.
The site also faces funding difficulties as it has been placed on watchlists for the US and Australian governments, meaning that collecting money through Moneybookers, its online agency, has been difficult. Its PayPal account was suspended earlier this year. The WikiLeaks website was last night shut down for maintenance.
The US and Britain led the push to invade Iraq in March 2003 to topple Saddam Hussein who they wrongly suspected of harbouring weapons of mass destruction.
More than 100,000 Iraqis were killed in the war and bloody insurgency that followed. Millions of civilians were displaced and many more suffered injuries, both physical and mental. On the coalition side, the US military lost more than 4,000 servicemen and women. The British toll was 179.
Seven years after the invasion, Britain has largely pulled out its troop presence, while the US aims to bring the remainder if its troops home by the end of next year.
Iraq, however, is far from stable having failed to form a new government more than seven months after its last election.
The Times
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Old 18-10-2010, 10:16 AM   #11
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http://mashable.com/2010/10/15/wikil...concerns-loom/

WikiLeaks to Release 400,000 Secret Documents as Funding Concerns Loom



Wikileaks is expected to release over 400,000 sensitive documents on Monday in what will be the largest intelligence leak since the Afghan War reports.

The Pentagon is bracing itself for the potential fallout of the release of secret documents detailing the inner workings of the Iraq War. According to multiple reports, the Pentagon has been sifting through the database where the documents originated. A Pentagon spokesperson said that it set up a 120-person task force several weeks ago to determine the potential implications and damage of the military reports being leaked.
The documents are expected to be released simultaneously by The New York Times, The Guardian and Der Spiegel, the same three media organizations that worked with WikiLeaksWikileaks on the Afghan War Diary in July. Those 90,000 logs detailed information on Taliban attacks, civilian deaths, NATO strategy, involvement by Pakistan in the insurgency and more.
The leak brought unprecedented media attention for the whistleblower organization. It also resulted in widespread controversy, both in political chambers and in media circles. The Pentagon even threatened action if WikiLeaks “didn’t do the right thing” and return the stolen documents.
Recently though, the controversy surrounding WikiLeaks has risen to dramatic heights. Founder Julian Assange was accused of rape, and although those charges have been dropped, his handling of the situation has led to internal strife at the organization, enough so that one of its spokespeople resigned in protest.
That’s not all, either; Wikileaks claims that its funding has been blocked because it has been placed on watchlists for both the U.S. and Australian governments. It can no longer accept donations through MoneybookersMoneybookers, the site that collected the organization’s donations. PayPal suspended Wikileaks’ account earlier this year.
Will next week’s Iraq War documents help get WikiLeaks back on track, or will the controversy surround the organization only grow? What kind of impact will the reports have on the Iraq War, world politics and WikiLeaks itself? We’re going to soon find out.
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Old 18-10-2010, 10:37 AM   #12
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WikiLeaks to Release 400,000 Iraqi War Docs - Genuine Truthers or Pentagon Psy-Op?

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Old 19-10-2010, 08:24 AM   #13
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http://www.physorg.com/news/2010-10-...spokesman.html

WikiLeaks to release Iraq war files very soon: spokesman (Update)

October 18, 2010 Enlarge
The homepage of the WikiLeaks.org website is seen on a computer after leaked classified military documents were posted to it July 2010 in Miami, Florida. An Icelandic spokesman for WikiLeaks said the whistleblowing website would not publish some 400,000 secret military reports on the Iraq war, but would make new documents public "very soon."
Whistleblowing website WikiLeaks will not publish some 400,000 secret reports on the Iraq war on Monday as had been widely rumoured, but they would be available "very soon", a spokesman said.



"There are rumours that have been floating around for some time, there is nothing you can do about it, they're obviously not correct. I can confirm that there's nothing coming out today," Kristinn Hrafnsson, a close collaborator of founder Julian Assange, told AFP.
"I can say with certainty that WikiLeaks will publish something very soon. We don't comment on what we are working on and don't give any exact dates," he said.
Assange also refused to give an exact date for the publication of the documents.
"WikiLeaks does not speak about upcoming releases dates," he wrote in an online article, the authenticity of which was confirmed by Hrafnsson.
"Indeed, with very rare exceptions we do not communicate any specific information about upcoming releases, since that simply provides fodder for abusive organisations to get their spin machines ready," he said.
The Pentagon scoured through an Iraq war database Monday to prepare for potential fallout from an expected release by WikiLeaks of some 400,000 secret military reports.
The massive release is set to dwarf the whistleblower website's publication of 77,000 classified US military documents on the war in Afghanistan in July, including the names of Afghan informants and other details from raw intelligence reports.
Assange was on Monday denied a permit to live and work in Sweden, where he is being investigated after a complaint of rape filed by two Swedish women in August. He denies any wrongdoing.
WikiLeaks has not identified the source of the documents it obtained but suspicion has fallen on Bradley Manning, a US Army intelligence analyst who is currently in military custody.
Manning was arrested in May following the release by WikiLeaks of video footage of a US Apache helicopter strike in Iraq in which civilians died and has been charged with delivering defence information to an unauthorised source.
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Old 19-10-2010, 09:30 PM   #14
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bumping for the morning crew
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Old 20-10-2010, 09:14 PM   #15
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http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSN1811423120101019

UPDATE 1-Pentagon cautions news media on WikiLeaks documents






Mon Oct 18, 2010 10:00pm EDT

* WikiLeaks due to release leaked US Iraq war documents
* Pentagon urges whistle-blower site not to post them
* Pentagon calls WikiLeaks a "disreputable organization" (Adds WikiLeaks comment, paragraph 8-9)
By David Alexander
WASHINGTON, Oct 18 (Reuters) - The Pentagon urged news organizations on Monday not to publish classified U.S. documents due to be released by WikiLeaks as U.S. officials brace for a mass disclosure of leaked Iraq war files by the whistle-blower website.
WikiLeaks, which in July released some 70,000 U.S. documents on the Afghanistan war, is expected soon to post on its website as many as 500,000 classified leaked U.S. documents from the Iraq war. The U.S. government in July condemned the release of the initial leaked documents, which painted a grim picture of the war in Afghanistan that began in 2001.
Pentagon spokesman Colonel David Lapan said the U.S. military is "absolutely" urging WikiLeaks to "return the stolen documents to the United States government and ... not publish them." Lapan also appealed to the news media.
"News organizations should be cautioned not to facilitate the leaking of classified documents with this disreputable organization known as WikiLeaks," Lapan said.
"The concern is that WikiLeaks as an organization should not be made more credible by having credible news organizations facilitate what they're doing," he said.
The Pentagon's comments came on the same day that Sweden said it denied a work and residency permit to Julian Assange, founder of WikiLeaks. [ID:nLDE69H23H]
WikiLeaks Tweeted a response late Monday, saying: "Rather than apologizing for misleading the press, the Pentagon tries bully it into not reporting."
It also Tweeted a link to an earlier version of this story.
Assange has been establishing a base in Sweden in order to benefit from the Nordic country's strict journalist protection laws. He is also being investigated over rape allegations in Sweden, which he has denied, calling them baseless.
Assange, an Australian citizen, can appeal the decision within three weeks.
'VENEER OF LEGITIMACY'
At the Pentagon, Lapan said he was not suggesting that news organizations ignore leaked documents, but questioned providing "a veneer of legitimacy to WikiLeaks" by publishing the originals.

"WikiLeaks as an organization is irresponsible in taking hundreds of thousands, potentially in this case, at least tens of thousands in past instances, of classified stolen documents and publishing them on the Web," Lapan said.
A Pentagon team already has reviewed the set of documents that it believes WikiLeaks is preparing to publish, Lapan said. The 120-member team is prepared to move quickly once the documents are published to verify whether they are the same and to assess the damage they might cause, he said.
With the early review, the Pentagon hopes to be able to move rapidly to mitigate any damage the leaks might cause to their intelligence sources and methods of operations, Lapan said. A main concern is for the safety of Iraqis named in the files who may have assisted U.S. forces, he said.
The documents posted by WikiLeaks in July detailed allegations that U.S. forces sought to cover up civilian deaths as well as U.S. concern that Pakistan secretly aided Taliban militants even as it took billions of dollars in U.S. aid.
At the time of the July leak of Afghanistan war documents, the top U.S. military officer, Admiral Mike Mullen, said that WikiLeaks might have the blood of U.S. troops and Afghan civilians on its hands because it had leaked files naming people who had collaborated with U.S. forces.
But U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates said in an Aug. 16 letter to the head of the Senate Armed Services Committee that the leak had not revealed any "sensitive intelligence sources or methods."
(Additional reporting by JoAnne Allen, Editing by Will Dunham)
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Old 20-10-2010, 09:49 PM   #16
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http://www.allvoices.com/contributed...n-iraq/stories

http://www.allvoices.com/s/event-705...YyMzM4Lmh0bWw=

Pentagon sets up team as massive WikiLeak nears



Updated on Tuesday, October 19, 2010, 18:27

Washington: The Pentagon said it had a 120-member team prepared to review a massive leak of as many as 500,000 Iraq war documents, which are expected to be released by the WikiLeaks website sometime this month.

Pentagon spokesman colonel Dave Lapan said the timing of the leak remained unclear but the defense department was ready for a document dump as early as Monday or Tuesday, a possibility raised in previous WikiLeaks statements.


However, an Icelandic spokesman for WikiLeaks said the website would not publish the reports on the Iraq war on Monday, but would make new documents public "very soon."

"There are rumours that have been floating around for some time, there is nothing you can do about it, they're obviously not correct. I can confirm that there's nothing coming out today," Kristinn Hrafnsson said.

"I can say with certainty that WikiLeaks will publish something very soon," the close collaborator of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange added.

Meanwhile, people familiar with the upcoming leak said they do not expect WikiLeaks to release the classified files for at least another week.

If confirmed, the leak would be much larger than the record-breaking release of more than 70,000 Afghan war documents in July, which stoked debate about the 9-yearold conflict but did not contain major revelations. It was the largest security breach of its kind in US history.

Bureau Report
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Old 20-10-2010, 09:50 PM   #17
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http://www.allvoices.com/s/event-705...ZlbGF0aW9ucy8=

WikiLeaks coy on content of next revelations

WASHINGTON (AFP) - The whistleblowing website WikiLeaks annonced Tuesday it had not specified what its next revelations would be about, amid fierce speculation that further secret US military files would be unveiled.
In a tweet on the micro-blogging networking site Twitter, WikiLeaks said: "We did not say we were publishing something on Iraq."
The US Pentagon said last week it was scouring through an Iraq war database to prepare for potential fallout from an expected release by WikiLeaks of some 400,000 secret military reports.
Pentagon officials set up a 120-person taskforce several weeks ago to comb through the Iraq database and "determine what the possible impacts might be," said Colonel David Lapan, a Pentagon spokesman.
WikiLeaks said Monday it would publish something something soon, but did not specify the content.
"I can say with certainty that WikiLeaks will publish something very soon. We don't comment on what we are working on and don't give any exact dates," Kristinn Hrafnsson, a close collaborator of founder Julian Assange, told AFP.
The whistleblower website published 77,000 classified US military documents on the war in Afghanistan in July.
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Old 20-10-2010, 10:03 PM   #18
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http://www.allvoices.com/s/event-705...5kZXguaHRtbA==

Pentagon ready and waiting to respond to next WikiLeaks release

By Larry Shaughnessy, CNN Pentagon Producer
October 18, 2010 -- Updated 2121 GMT (0521 HKT)


The Pentagon is demanding that WikiLeaks not publish the documents and return whatever copies it has.


STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • WikiLeaks is expected to publish 400,000 military documents from the Iraq war
  • The Pentagon has assembled 120 experts to review any published material
  • A Pentagon spokesman says the experts have a good idea of what might be published
  • But the experts don't know for certain what the website is planning, he says





Washington (CNN) -- The Pentagon has assembled a group of 120 experts ready to review the anticipated publication by the website WikiLeaks of 400,000 military documents from the war in Iraq, according to Pentagon spokesman Col. Dave Lapan.
Lapan said the Pentagon's team of experts has a good idea of which documents WikiLeaks may be ready to leak, but the experts don't know for certain what the website is planning.
"We don't know how these documents might be released, when these documents might be released, in what number they might be released, so we're sort of preparing for all eventualities," Lapan said Monday.
In preparation, the task force has gone through what the Pentagon believes are the relevant documents -- "significant activities" reports from the Iraq war.
"The team has already reviewed all of the documents in the Iraq database," said Lapan. "And what they are prepared for is, once there is a release of documents, to evaluate them very quickly to see ... whether they are of concern to us."
If the anticipated leak happens, it will dwarf the release last summer of 76,000 documents related to the Afghan war, which remains one of the largest leaks of classified material in the history of the U.S. Department of Defense.
Lapan would give only a vague description of the documents that the Department of Defense believes are in the hands of WikiLeaks.
"Certainly some of the reporting are things that have been reported in the media for years, from civilian casualties, alleged detainee abuse, to any of those things," Lapan said. "Yes, they have been reported on. But names of individuals, again, some of those things. We'll just sort of wait and see what comes."
The Pentagon, as it did after the Afghan documents were leaked, is demanding that WikiLeaks not publish the documents on the internet and return whatever copies it may have.
"They can return them. They got them in a certain way, whether they were on disk or whatever, they can return those. Obviously we understand that nothing goes away forever, but the primary idea is they would not publish them," Lapan said.
Lapan also warned traditional news media outlets not to assist WikiLeaks.
"News organizations should be cautioned not to facilitate the leaking of classified documents with this disreputable organization known as WikiLeaks," he told reporters Monday. "The concern is that WikiLeaks as an organization should not be made more credible by having credible news organizations facilitate what they are doing."
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Old 20-10-2010, 10:27 PM   #19
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http://www.heraldsun.com.au/ipad-app...-1225940953648

WikiLeaks founder takes aim at credibility of Wired magazine

  • By staff writers
  • From: NewsCore
  • October 20, 2010 1:43AM
WIKILEAKS founder Julian Assange has attacked Wired magazine, claiming it is deliberately spreading misinformation. The criticism comes amid ongoing speculation this week about the release of confidential Iraq war documents.
In a post on Twitter yesterday, Assange, 39, accused one of the US tech magazine's blogs of being a "known opponent" of WikiLeaks and a "spreader of all sorts of misinformation" about the whistle-blowing website.
Assange wrote that speculation on the blog led to more than 700 articles being published all over the world this week about WikiLeak's supposed upcoming release of confidential Iraq war documents.
He wrote that the only source of claims that WikiLeaks would release nearly 400,000 documents on Iraq was Wired blog.
Assange wrote that the magazine had "ramped up" its attacks on WikiLeaks since the whistle-blowing organization called for an investigation into what role Wired magazine played in the arrest of US intelligence analyst Bradley Manning.


Manning was arrested by US authorities on suspicion of leaking video footage of a US air strike in Baghdad. The footage was published by WikiLeaks in April 2010.
Assange also accused two Wired blogs - Threat Level and Danger Room - of "ship[ping] puff pieces" and publishing "a tremendous amount of other completely false information [about] WikiLeaks."
Wired senior editor Kevin Poulsen hit back at Assange's attack, saying the magazine and its blogs had "diligently charted WikiLeaks' successes, and its setbacks" in more than 70 stories over the years.
Poulsen also wrote that the magazine offered Assange the chance to comment on the report prior to publication.
"Assange is notoriously sensitive to critical press. He has a strong personality, and at times his reaction reflects that," he added.
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Old 20-10-2010, 10:44 PM   #20
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http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7...972065,00.html

Wikileaks says Iraq not subject of classifed documents.

http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7...972065,00.html
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