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Old 30-05-2013, 01:29 AM   #67761
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May 29, 2013 · 1:17 pm
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Satanist Ritual Abuse And The Problem Of Credibility

It’s very interesting to talk to professionals and discover that not all agree with the report by Professor Jean la Fontaine, an anthropologist, who was appointed by Virginia Bottomley, the then Health Secretary, to research ‘Ritual Abuse’ in 1991. Some ask what the consequences of La Fontaine’s report have been over the last 20 years.

Satanist Ritual Abuse and the Problem of Credibility by Dr Joan Coleman

Do some satanists really commit crimes and abuse children? Many people believe not. My own hard-earned professional experience tells me otherwise.

This chapter is an account of my own journey: a journey from relative ignorance prior to 1980, through growing awareness of the extent of child sexual abuse, through my bizarre, frightening introduction to satanist ritual abuse, to my eventual belief that satanist crime does, indeed, occur. And I would like to think that mine is a reflective, rather than reflexive, belief (van der Hart & Nijenhuis, 1999) – that is, belief that stems from reflecting on the evidence, rather that blind acceptance of what initially seems highly improbable.

Ritual abuse evoked considerable interest in Britain between 1987 and 1994. The subject was taken up by many professionals, mainly psychologists, counsellors, and social workers; numerous children thought to be at risk were taken into care. In 1989, some of us who had encountered it formed an organisation called RAINS (Ritual Abuse Information Network & Support), with the aim of sharing information and supporting each other.

Ritual abuse can be found in a wide range of social and religious backgrounds. In this chapter, I focus on abuse within satanist groups, as that is the type that I myself and most RAINS members have largely encountered.

In 1990, the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) issued a press release regarding the large number of such cases they were working with. There were numerous press articles and several television programmes. In 1991, Health Secretary Virginia Bottomley appointed an anthropologist, Professor Jean la Fontaine, to research the subjects of organised and ritual abuse. La Fontaine had already written an acclaimed book on child sexual abuse.

In the summary of her report, La Fontaine concluded that there was no evidence of satanist abuse and that the alleged disclosures of the children were largely suggested by adults. In those cases in which the police had found ‘satanic’ paraphernalia, she maintained that these were simply used by paedophiles to intimidate the children (Great Britain, Dept. of Health, 1994).

Largely as a result of this report, both the media and professionals became cautious about the subject of ritual abuse, and many shied away from it. Social workers were instructed not to mention the words ‘ritual’ or ‘satanic’ in any reports regarding child abuse.

Meanwhile, an increasing number of adults were seeking help with what they were convinced were genuine memories of severe and sadistic abuse that they had undergone as children. The recognition of the reality of child sexual abuse and its resulting psychological effects enabled adult survivors of satanist ritual abuse to feel some hope they would be believed. However, this was not always the case because when ceremonies and sacrifices were mentioned, these were dismissed by some psychiatrists as delusions and many survivors were given inappropriate treatment with antipsychotic drugs. The False Memory Syndrome Foundation (set up in 1992) and the British False Memory Society (set up in 1993) also contributed to the general attitude of scepticism among professionals, and the whole subject of ritual crime became ‘suspect’.

Incidentally, the reader may notice that I have been using the term ‘satanist’ rather than the more commonly used ‘satanic’. In my view, it is important to make this distinction because, although the alleged abuse may be done in the name of Satan, whom the abusers profess to worship, it is nonetheless people, not Satan, who are the abusers.

From ignorance, through uncertainty, to reflective belief

When I was working towards membership of the Royal College of Psychiatrists in the early 1970s, only a few days of the course were dedicated to the subject of sexual disorders, which included perversions and fetishisms, incest, and paedophilia. The latter was considered rare and usually referred to strange men preying on children singly, rather than in groups. When the existence of the Paedophile Information Exchange network was exposed less than a decade later, it was an eye-opener for many that a large number of professional people appeared to be abusing on an organised scale. Furthermore, most of us were still unaware of the extent of child sexual abuse by family members.

Satanist Ritual Abuse and the Problem of Credibility by Dr Joan Coleman
http://theneedleblog.wordpress.com/2...f-credibility/
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Old 30-05-2013, 01:30 AM   #67762
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http://www.standard.co.uk/news/londo...f-8635824.html

London Evening Standard

Tory MP demands former BBC chief returns from US to account for himself
29 May 2013

More problems for former BBC director-general Mark Thompson. Rob Wilson MP has demanded he return from the US to explain how the Corporation wasted almost £100 million on its botched digital media project.

Wilson, Tory MP for Reading East, wrote to Thompson on Friday about the “staggering waste” of the BBC’s Digital Media Initiative (DMI), which has saddled licence payers with a bill for £98.4 million, and says he must leave New York, where he is now chief executive of The New York Times, to shed light on the fiasco because it was on his watch.

Wilson writes: “Such staggering waste at a time when public money is more precious than ever is utterly shameful. As the man running the BBC between 2004 and 2012, it appears that you would have had some involvement in a project of this scale.

“I am therefore writing to you to urge you to return to London at the earliest opportunity to explain your knowledge of the DMI so that people can understand better what went wrong.”

Wilson also challenges Thompson over the unresolved matter of when he first knew the nature of Newsnight’s axed 2011 investigation of Jimmy Savile.

He says: “As someone who remains on the public payroll via your BBC pension, you will appreciate the need for you to attend to both of these matters urgently. I trust that your new employers will agree with this and from their own corporate perspective would welcome an opportunity for you to discuss these two important matters.”

Thompson has already had to return to London once to give evidence to a BBC inquiry. Twice would be a bit awkward.

http://www.standard.co.uk/news/londo...f-8635824.html

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Old 30-05-2013, 01:34 AM   #67763
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http://www.broadcastnow.co.uk/news/p...056865.article

Date set for inquest into death of BBC journalist
29 May, 2013 | By Jake Kanter


An inquest into the death of BBC journalist Russell Joslin, who apparently committed suicide following a series of workplace harassment claims, is to take place on 5 July.

The hearing will begin at 10am at Warwickshire Justice Centre after Joslin died on 22 October 2012 at Warwick Hospital. The cause of his death was recorded as asphyxiation.

The BBC admitted in March that its handling of complaints made by Joslin, a reporter for the BBC Coventry and Warwickshire local radio station, was “not good enough”.

It followed the publication of a 27-page review into the corporation’s handling of the case by former BBC human resources executive Lesley Granger.

The review set out how complaints made by Joslin about a female colleague, who was not named for legal reasons, were not appropriately dealt with.

Joslin’s allegations related to five incidents which occurred between 2005 and 2008, including an abusive voicemail he received from the colleague in 2006.

The issue resurfaced last year during the Jimmy Savile scandal when Joslin became “seriously troubled and agitated” after reading comments about sexual harassment made by the female colleague in Sunday newspapers.

This led him to formally complain about bullying and harassment on 11 October - 11 days before his death at Warwick Hospital.


The BBC apologised “unreservedly” to Joslin’s family, who said the corporation “could and should have done more” to help him.

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Old 30-05-2013, 02:03 AM   #67764
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Originally Posted by jkick

Quote:
Its no wonder Savile was so untouchable, he certainly had associations at the highest level.

Savile was associated with Frank Bruno - Frank Bruno's brother worked for Sabrewatch. Sabrewatch leading security firm in UK.

Sabrewatch Limited was fined £140,000 at Southwark Crown Court on Friday [26 Feb], after being found guilty on Monday last week [22 Feb] on seven of nine sample counts - many other guards were unlawfully deployed around the country.

Director and 94% shareholder Luke Lucas, 61, of Charters Towers, Felcourt Road, East Grinstead (the company address), was fined £70,000.

Sabrewatch has contracts with Marks and Spencer.

Former MS chairmen include:

Lord Myners. Financial Services Secretary (sometimes referred to as City Minister[1]) in HM Treasury, the UK's finance ministry, during the Labour Government of Gordon Brown.[2] He held the position from October 2008 until May 2010, and was made a life peer in consequence of his appointment. He also served on the Prime Minister's National Economic Council.

Sir Richard Greenbury. Greenbury was born in Carlisle and educated at Ealing County Grammar School in London. As a young man he claimed to have been, “The most caned boy in school”, an achievement that he suggested had taught him, “The importance of discipline.” (wiki)

Jimmy Savile known to vist MS head office. Maybe this was to see Gabrielle Greenbury wife of Richard.

The Jimmy Savile Charitable Trust is primarily based in the Leeds area, although not all of its trustees - listed as Luke Lucas, Dr Roger Bodley and Lady Gabrielle Greenbury on the Charity Commission's website - still live there.

Luke Lucas and Gabrielle Greenbury are also members of the Alpine club org uk. They applied for membership at the same time in 2001.

ALPINE CLUB

Telephone & Fax (020) 7613 0755 55/56 CHARLOTTE RD
E-mail: [email protected] LONDON, EC2A 3QF
http://www.alpine-club.org.uk
Newsletter 1/2001 January 2001
Welcomed as Aspirant Members are:
Lady Gabrielle Greenbury Toto Anne Gronlund Luke Lucas
Charters Towers, Felcourt Road 105 Green Road Charters Towers, Felcourt Road
East Grinstead, RH19 2JG Poole, Dorset BH15 1QT East Grinstead RH19 2JG
British. Company Director Danish. NHS Director British. Company Director
Proposer: Steve Jones Proposer: Jack Crewe, WMC Proposer: Steve Jones
Seconder: Pat Littlejohn Seconder: Alan Yeend Seconder: Pat Littlejohn


Gabrielle Greenbury was also director of Princedale company. Sir Harry Solomon formerly at food group Hillsdown was also directer at the same time.

Sir Harry Solomon is the co-founder and Vice Chairman of the Portland Trust.

THE PORTLAND TRUST ANNUAL LECTURE

Intelligence and the Making of Foreign Policy: A Personal Reflection
Efraim Halevy

Portland Fellow
Head of the Center for Strategic and Policy Studies, the Hebrew University
Head of the MOSSAD (19982002)

Monday 21 June, 2004

The Locarno Suite, Foreign & Commonwealth Office, King Charles Street, London, SW1A

Intelligence and the Making of Foreign Policy

It is both an honour and a privilege for me to have been invited to deliver the first Portland Trust annual lecture; for this I am indeed grateful to Sir Ronald Cohen, Sir Harry Solomon and to Ellis Goodman.

Sir Harry, founder of Hillsdown Holdings plc, has also been involved in Monitor Quest since 1999 and provides direction and strategic advice to the Board. He qualified and practised as a solicitor, and is currently a director of several companies both within the UK and abroad providing commercial expertise at the highest level.

(London, 15th March 2005) Quest is delighted to announce the appointment of the former Mossad Director, Efraim Halevy, as a Special Advisor to the Board. Quest is one of the UK’s leading security and intelligence consultancies.(chaired by Lord Stevens, former Commissioner London Metropolitan Police)

Mr Halevy has 40 years of experience in the Mossad, Israel’s secret intelligence service, including four years as its chief from 1998-2002. He recently stepped down as the Director of Israel’s National Security Council and as National Security Advisor to the Prime Minister. His diplomatic career included postings to both Washington and Paris as Political Counsellor at the Israeli Embassy. He was appointed Ambassador of Israel to the European Union in 1995.

Efraim Halevi also happens to be a member of the Clove Club, founded in 1848 with the motto, "God Grant Grace":

The Clove Club is the organisation for anyone who attended Hackney Downs School (formerly The Grocers' Company's School), Downs Park Road, London, E.5.

Efraim Halevi is listed under "CLOVE MEMBERS AND CONTACTS as at 12.2.02."

Mr.J, Halevy, B1945-1948, Mr.Efraim

Who happens to be listed right alongside another member of the Clove Club Old Boys Association:

The Lord, Levy, B1955-1962, Michael

Michael Levy, Baron Levy
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Michael Abraham Levy, Baron Levy (born 11 July 1944) is a British politician, a Labour member of the House of Lords and the major fundraiser for the UK Labour Party and several Jewish and Israeli charities. A long-standing friend of the Prime Minister, Tony Blair, Lord Levy is in the unique position of being an important pro-Israel lobbyist and Tony Blair's special envoy to the Middle East since 2002. Levy was arrested and questioned in connection with the "Cash for Peerages" inquiry by the Metropolitan Police on 12 July 2006.[1] After six hours of questioning he was released on police bail. On 20 September 2006 he was questioned a second time, and again released on bail.[2] On 30 January 2007 Lord Levy was arrested on suspicion of conspiring to pervert the course of justice.[3]

Tony Blairs wife Cherie is also connected to Sir Harry Solomon through Norwood .


Norwood chief executive Norma Brier, Erica Marks; Cherie Blair, Norwood’s patron of children’s services; David Marks


Norwood is a UK charity established in 1785 in the East End of London.

In 1996, it merged with Ravenswood, a Berkshire-based charity for people with learning disabilities, to create one of the largest welfare organisations within the United Kingdom Jewish community.

Norwood currently provides more than 120 services for people with learning disabilities, and children and families in need, within the Jewish and wider communities in London and the South East.

These specialist services benefit more than 7,000 people each year and are delivered by 1,200 staff and supported by around 800 volunteers.

Norwood’s Patron is HM The Queen and its Patron of Children’s Services is Cherie Blair.
Simon Cowell with a Norwood service user at the annual dinner 2010

The charity’s celebrity supporters include Simon Cowell, Elton John, David Furnish, Sir Philip Green, Bernie Ecclestone, Roger Daltrey, Theo Paphitis, Tom Conti and Piers Morgan.

Solomon holds a portfolio of non-executive and advisory positions at charities and companies including Norwood.

Norwood’s Patron is HM The Queen.
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Old 30-05-2013, 02:36 AM   #67765
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Evening Times (Scotland)
Feb 2, 1981
DJ's brother denies sex assault
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...pg=6408,31143&

"DJ's brother denies sex assault"

Allegations that Jimmy Savile's brother Johnny committed a sexual assault are true , a divisional nursing officer told an industrial tribunal today.

Johnny Savile was sacked from his job as recreation officer at a South London psychiatric hospital after a woman patient complained she had been "groped."

Mr Savile is claiming unfair dismissal against Springfield Psychiatric Hospital in Tooting, but today divisional nursing officer John Edwards told the tribunal he had no doubt the allegation was true.

He said the complaint by a 37-year-old woman patient, who was admitted following a drug overdose, had been backed by the testimony of another patient.

Mr Edwards said she told him that 61-year-old Johnny Savile had been "larking about", and miming to a record in his office when he lifted up the woman's smock, and touched her stomach and breasts.

The 37-year-old patient allegedly called: "Get him off me. I got a husband and five children."

Later the woman allegedly told Mr Savile that her husband would annihilate him.

Mr Edwards said he did not know of any other complaints against Mr Savile who was dismissed for gross misconduct after six years at the hospital.

Mr Savile, who denies the allegation, lives in Richmond, Surrey.

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...pg=6408,31143&

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Old 30-05-2013, 02:48 AM   #67766
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BBC News
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/e...re/7568886.stm

Monday, 18 August 2008

"Veteran Savile fixes traffic jam"

Veteran DJ Sir Jimmy Savile fixed it for police when he took up traffic directing duties after coming across a car accident near his home.

The star of Jim'll Fix It donned a high-visibility police jacket and safely guided vehicles past the scene in Oakwood, north Leeds, on Sunday.

Sir Jimmy, who lives in a penthouse overlooking Roundhay Park, said he wanted to make sure people were safe.

West Yorkshire Police thanked Sir Jimmy for his efforts at the scene.

White-haired Sir Jimmy Savile rose to fame firstly as a radio disc jockey and then a television presenter.

No blockage

He had been travelling to a restaurant in Leeds for a meal when he came across the accident.

He said: "I was the first on the scene and so I sprang out to help.


"I was making sure the people were OK and there were no serious injuries - luckily there weren't because both the cars were really damaged.


"But I wanted to make sure it would be safe for the emergency vehicles to pull up.

"I was directing the traffic through so it didn't block up, and all of a sudden two fire engines turned up, and police cars.

"A copper came across and said: 'You're doing a great job there Jimmy' and he gave me a high-visibility jacket to wear.

"I was just helping my fellow citizens."

West Yorkshire Police said: "When officers arrived at the scene of a road traffic collision a member of the public did present themselves to offer their assistance in directing the traffic.

"He was issued with a high-visibility jacket and helped to safely direct the traffic along the diversion.

"At no point was the member of public placed in any danger and we would like to thank him for his assistance with this matter."


Police said five people suffered minor injuries in the accident on Roundhay Road. One person was taken to Leeds General Infirmary for treatment.

Sir Jimmy is a member of the Institute of Advanced Motorists and he spearheaded the road safety Clunk Click Every Trip campaign in the 1970s to encourage motorists to use seat belts.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/e...re/7568886.stm

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Old 30-05-2013, 03:00 AM   #67767
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Thorne and District Gazette
Published on 07/12/2011
http://www.thornegazette.co.uk/commu...trop_1_4039454

When Jim Fixed it for Doncaster DJ Ray Nortrop
Published on 07/12/2011 17:02

In This week in a tribute to the late Sir Jimmy Savile, Doncaster man Ray Nortrop gives us just a brief taste of his encounters with the legendary DJ including the time he first met former South Kirby Colliery Bevin Boy just plain Jimmy Savile when they both attended a wrestling match as spectators at the Windsor Cinema in Balby which is long gone now,

Jimmy was also occasionally seen at Doncaster Corn Exchange with Yorkshire wrestler Les Kellett when he appeared on ITV’s World of Sport, he was friendly with ringside wrestling commentator Kent Walton (who like Jimmy was also a Radio Luxembourg disc jockey), local referee Chic Booth also joined them now and then.

Long before the BBC originated “Jim’ll Fix It” which first went out on May 31 1975, the deliciously eccentric Mr. Savile fixed it for Ray as a struggling, fledgling disc jockey, aged 20. It is a story that Ray remembers well and was forever grateful

One of Jimmy’s former Mecca management associates, Jack Allison, who in the autumn of 1964 was managing the Majestic Ballroom (Top Rank) in Leeds as well as being responsible for engaging a resident disc jockey for Doncaster’s 2,000 capacity Top Rank Suite on Silver Street which opened in October 1964.

It was Jack who informed Jimmy that The Rank Organisation had scoured the Doncaster area for a disc jockey and had drawn a blank.

Up stepped Jimmy who then promptly sent Ray a handwritten note informing him about the job vacancy.

Following a number of auditions which also included ballet dancer/hilarious wrestler Ricki Starr and press photographer Roy Ingram (Danum Press Agency), Ray ended up with what was to become the plum DJ job of that era in South Yorkshire.

Then in spring 1966 the Lincolnshire Chronicle newspaper organised what eventually came to be acknowledged as Britain’s first open air pop festival on May 30 1966 at Sincil Bank home of Lincoln City Football Club. It must have been quite a show.

What a line up it was too, The Who, The Yardbirds, The Small Faces, The Kinks, Georgie Fame and the Blue Flames, The Alan Price Set, Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and Tich and The Barron Knights were just a few of the big names to appear, all presented by Jimmy Savile and his former Radio Luxembourg disc jockey colleague Keith Fordyce.

Jim stepped in again to fix for the Doncaster DJ and the event promised to be so enormous that he persuaded the promoters to hire a third compere and due to Jim’s personal insistence Ray got the job, sharing equal billing with Jimmy and Keith Fordyce. All three pop pickers hosting the event found it a rather daunting and nervous prospect, nothing quite like it had ever happened before but all went well.

On a final note, as a disc jockey, Jimmy Savile only made one professional appearance in Doncaster and that was at the Top Rank Suite when he invited Mr. Nortrop to appear with him on stage - but Ray was away on holiday and couldn’t make it!

http://www.thornegazette.co.uk/commu...trop_1_4039454

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Old 30-05-2013, 03:04 AM   #67768
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Farmers Guardian
August 24th 2007
http://www.farmersguardian.com/yfc-g.../11551.article

Farmers Guardian
August 24th 2007

YFC guests at launch of Savile’s Hall

MEMBERS of Yorkshire YFC rubbed shoulders with television and sporting personalities at the launch party of Savile’s Hall in Leeds.

The new £5million venue was opened in spectacular style by the Royal Armouries, with Leeds legend Sir Jimmy Savile arriving in a pink stretch limousine in front of an audience which included Emmerdale and sporting stars.

Yorkshire Young Farmers were selected as one of 100 Yorkshire charities to be invited to the event and received a commemorative limited edition Jimmy Savile poster.

The Armouries decided the Jim’ll Fix It hero, who has raised more than £42m for charity, was the only person they could name the hall after.

They say the 80-year-old has remained loyal to Leeds all his life and the honour was only fitting, as a way of thanking him for his extraordinary efforts for others.

Members of Worth Valley Young Farmers Club, Tom Ogden and Sarah Woollard, were impressed with the new hall and pleased to meet the former DJ and wrestler as he mingled with the 600 crowd.

“Sir Jimmy is a legend and we were delighted that the profile of Young Farmers is now such that we get invited to this type of event,” said Sarah.

http://www.farmersguardian.com/yfc-g.../11551.article

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Old 30-05-2013, 03:19 AM   #67769
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Digital Spy
Published Sunday, Sep 2 2007, 1:02am EDT By Joanne Oatts http://www.digitalspy.com/media/news...my-savile.html


Now then, now then: Sir Jimmy Savile
Sunday, Sep 2 2007
By Joanne Oatts

The man, the legend that is Sir Jimmy Savile wowed the audience at MGEITF last weekend with his ageless brand of enthusiasm. Born in Leeds in 1926, he's been a coal miner, dance hall manager, Radio 1 DJ and Top of the Pops presenter. At the age of 81, Savile is still on TV, having pulled in the audiences with his recent series Jim'll Fix It Strikes Again on UKTV Gold. And the man who is known as much for his love of running as his TV work is as fit a as a fiddle, taking part in his 218th marathon just this weekend. A charmer to the last, I squeezed up next to the broadcasting legend on the infamous Jim'll Fix It chair following his MGEITF appearance, for a little chat about the state of TV, Globe Trekker and getting older.

So Jim, have you enjoyed today?
I feel very guilty, because I felt I was having a better time than all the audience, who were obviously having a great time. Not just because what was going on 'on screen' [the clips of the 'Fix-its'], but their reactions to it. I mean something like this, which has been a long time coming - it started about six months ago - it's such a single honor to have at the Edinburgh Television Festival. And you think 'Ooh, what if it bombs? What if it's no good?'

In the press room, more people where watching the live feed for your spot than any other session!
Really! Well that's it. I think from a television point of view I have a disarming way. You see, I own Jim'll Fix It.

You own the brand?
I own the logo, the name - everything about it. So for me it has to be a 'take it easy baby, chill chill' - television is about having a good time, so it's very important to give people that are on the show a good time as well. If they have a good time, then we have a good time, and one can put this head on the pillow and go to sleep, because you know you've done a good job.

How do you feel television has change since Jim'll Fix It first started?
It went through a bad period I thought about ten years ago because the terrestrial channels seemed to be getting a bit tired. And then they started to play 'follow the leader' - a gardening program came on, and woh! - there were 94 gardening programs. Same with DIY - which is of no interest to me; cooking - I've not even got an oven in any of my places as I go out to eat. And then along came satellite TV - you've got a 500 English-speaking channels. And with this silly no-smoking ban, I'm more than happy to stop in and get a take-away, a good cigar and a glass whisky - seeing as I'm over-aged - and watch UKTV Gold, Travel Channel programs. Globe Trekker is one of my favorites. I'd love to meet the Globe Trekker team.

Maybe you could 'Fix It' for yourself?
Maybe, but I don't know any of them. There's a girl called Megan (McCormick) - I'd marry her tomorrow. Only for two hours though. I wouldn't interfere with her life at all. That Ian Wright - he can do anything! Climb up mountains, jump in cold water with no clothes on. I love today's TV - but only if you have a dish.

Because there's more choice?
Yes. I have this thing called Music Choice Extra, it means that in the morning I can switch it on, light a cigar, put the kettle on and have nice classical music - not because I am interested in classical music - I call it audible wallpaper. What it does, is it stops you remembering who 'she' was last night!

Really?
I'm a very bad man. I'm worse now because I am more experienced.

Did you think that when Jim'll Fix It started all those years ago you'd still be on TV now?
Do you know, that question was asked of me on Wednesday January 1, 1964, in Manchester in an old disused church when we did the first Top of the Pops. () A journalist asked me that question, and I said: 'As long as people buy records, Top of the Pops will last.' Which it did. Now Jim'll Fix It - as long as people want a good time there's room for Jim'll Fix It. Because I own it, I was totally adamant that I would never, ever let the standards drop. You can watch Jim'll Fix It with your eight-year-old daughter or your eighty-year-old grandmother and you won't be embarrassed, they'll be no questions asked and you'll have had a good time. When it first started thirty years ago [in 1975] the BBC prophesied 'doom and gloom' because it was too pure. An executive said to me: 'My children have always wanted to throw a custard pie at their teacher,' and I said 'That's out.' And he said 'Surely you're not going to draw the line at custard pies,' and I said 'I'm going to draw the line a long way before custard pies.' So they were all 'Ooh, Jim, you're standards are too high!' and it lasted twenty years [until 1994], and it got between 19 and 20 million viewers every week.

What would you like to be doing now?
I'd like to go back to doing nothing. I started off down the pits, I got blown up, I was walking with two sticks and a steel jacket for nearly three years, and I did nothing and I couldn't do nothing. It was one of the happiest times of me life. I had no money, I had no nothing, so obviously life doesn't stay the same forever, but if I could turn the clock back - I'd do nothing. Especially now that I'm loaded.

Do you think there will ever be a point where you'll completely retire?
First of all, I like that tonight. In fact, when I finished the show I said: 'What a marvellous fitting for the first day of retirement tomorrow'. But I've got as much chance of retiring as I have of flying to the moon, because these people [TV types] are even now ganging up and looking for any weak spots I might have. Oh they're buggers - they don't send fellas to talk to me, they send ladies to talk to me, because they know I'm a pushover! With ladies I always say yes.

Do you still run?
Yes. Last year I did the Glasgow Marathon and that was my 217th marathon. When I've finished speaking to you, I have got to go back down to Yorkshire, then back up to Glasgow for a marathon next weekend.

I think it's fantastic you're still running.
I think it's stupid.

Has a doctor ever told you not to run?
I am a doctor. I'm a Fellow of the Royal College of Radiology, a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons, a Doctor of Law, so I diagnose myself. I look in the mirror every day and say 'You're stupid son' - and then I carrying on doing it!

http://www.digitalspy.com/media/news...my-savile.html

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Old 30-05-2013, 03:43 AM   #67770
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The Glasgow Herald - Aug 1, 1977
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...=6412,6714021&

The Glasgow Herald
August 1, 1977

"Jimmy Savile injured"

Jimmy Savile was in hospital with a suspected broken ankle last night after stumbling during a six-mile mountain charity walk near Glencoe.

The disc jockey, who had been late for the walk in the forest of Glenachulish, was running to catch up with scores of children when he tripped.

But he carried on for two more miles to the finish with a badly swollen ankle and leaning on the shoulder of Mr Bruce James, a local climbing instructor.

Jimmy said: "I've done hundreds of sponsored walks and had 107 professional wrestling fights without anything like this. It's ridiculous."

Earlier, he had run in a 2000ft. race half way up Ben Nevis, followed by a 13-mile sponsored walk at Fort William.

He drove off last night for treatment at Belford Hospital, Fort William, and said he would take part in another 14-mile walk at Kilsyth, Stirlingshire, today.

...
(Article directly below Jimmy Savile article above! )

...
Woman attacked

Police in Dunfries were yesterday searching for a man who assaulted a disabled middle-aged woman in the grounds of the Crichton Royal Hospital, Dumfries.

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...=6412,6714021&

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Old 30-05-2013, 03:47 AM   #67771
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http://www.scotsman.com/news/jimmy-s...ance-1-1200139

New Scotsman

Jimmy Savile helps launch 'Jumbulance'
Published on 02/04/2007 11:48

A TARTAN clad Sir Jimmy Savile joined Cardinal Keith O'Brien to launch a specially designed "jumbulance" to help severely disabled people travel on pilgrimages and holidays.

Travel charity ACROSS dedicated the 13-metre long ambulance to the memory of Pope John Paul II at a ceremony outside Edinburgh's St. Mary's Cathedral yesterday. It will leave this week to take its first group of pilgrims to Lourdes for Easter.

ACROSS chairman Dr Alan Green said, "We also hope it will enable us to provide a holiday and day trip service."

It is the first completely new, redesigned giant ambulance to be commissioned for a British charity in ten years. It cost 375,000 and took 18 months to design, manufacture and fully equip, all paid for by donations.

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Old 30-05-2013, 04:01 AM   #67772
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http://www.guardian.co.uk/culture/20.../guesteditors2

The Sam Taylor-Wood issue
Lord of the bling

Harland Miller knows who invented hip-hop style - and gangsta rappers had nothing to do with it
Harland Miller
The Guardian, Tuesday 20 April 2004 05.47 EDT

In 1986 I took my first trip to New York. I had no plans for the length of my stay and assumed it would last about as long as my finances - which would have made it quite brief. As it turned out, they lasted longer than I thought. I was living in Williamsburg and, though it's quite the place now, at the time it was relatively cheap and run down. The longer I stayed, the more I liked it, until I didn't want to leave at all. So, when my means eventually did run out, I accepted a job with some Puerto Rican carpet layers I met through a guy in my building called Oscar. He was the leader, or foreman, of the gang.

Oscar, on discovering I was an artist, asked me to paint his portrait. It was when he came up to sit for me and found me on my knees, still stretching up the canvas with a staple gun in hand, that he suggested I work for him laying underfelt.

My first job was up in Harlem, and I remember thinking: "Hmm, that's a tough part of the world." Driving up that sunny morning, though, I was struck by how beautiful the buildings looked, especially the one we were contracted to work in. It was a huge top-to-toe renovation for some guy in the music business whose identity was a kind of secret. There was a lot of speculation among the gang as to who he might be, and by mid-morning a consensus had grown that it could be Afrika Bambaata.

Shortly before lunch a smart house keeper came up to say there was soup in the kitchen if we liked, and that it had been prepared the night before by ... what did she call him now? The owner? Something mysterious. It was his wish, she told us, that we all partook of it because he prided himself on his soup, and because it appealed to his sensibility to share - or words to that effect.

This seemed to cap speculation that it was indeed Afrika Bambaata, because apparently that was just the kind of guy he was. I couldn't say, really, because beyond his music, which I liked and still do, I knew nothing of him. If it was him, I now know he makes delicious soup, too - more of a stew really.

Afterwards, back in the huge room - empty, save for the fresh felt underlay - I felt a very Joseph Beuys kind of calm and so, while the others smoked outside, I relaxed against the wall with my book: Jimmy Savile's autobiography Love Is an Uphill Thing. I'd just reached the chapter in which Jimmy came to invent the "twin-decks" by paying a local metal worker to weld two domestic record decks together for more continuous play at his dance parties in Leeds. In so doing, he potentially became the first DJ.

When the rest of the gang trooped back in, Oscar, as though he had been put up to it, came over and said: "[B]Hey English guy, where ju get your cardigan?"

"In a thrift store, in Red Hook," I said.

"Ah," he said. "'Cause it looks like a mental patient's."

"OK," I said, and went back to the book, aware of the gang laughing in the background.

These guys were all very hot up on A: upfront sports gear, what rocked, what didn't. I knew my cardigan wasn't rocking. I wasn't trying to let the side down or anything, it's just that this was during the emergence of the Beastie Boys and there was a lot of opinion about them being white and inauthentic-looking in that kind of gear. But this wasn't the reason I resisted wearing trackies and gold chains. Somehow, whenever I saw white kids in Manhattan dressing "a la Beastie" I had an uncomfortable twinge that was nothing to do with white kids assimilating black youth culture, but related to something much more familiar to me, almost cosy in its familiarity - reminiscent of something traditional like warm beer or fish and chips.

Until then it had been only subliminal, but as I leafed through the photos in Jimmy Savile's book I suddenly realised what it was I was being reminded of. It was Jimmy Savile himself - or rather, his style.

In nearly all the pictures he wore tracksuits coupled with chunky gold jewellery. As I fanned through his career, the tracksuits became more flamboyant (handmade, in fact), the jewellery bigger, the look darker, meaner, with wraparound shades.

The book was a signed copy dedicated to my old neighbour, Joyce, a cleaner at St James's hospital in Leeds where Jimmy made frequent visits. Even the signature struck me as very rap: he used a pound sign for the J of Jimmy and a dollar sign for the S of Savile.

The back cover showed JS or £$ outside Stoke Manderville hospital, where he did a lot of charity work. He was wearing a flashy tracksuit, and it looked as if he had redeemed every pledged gold chain from every pawnshop in Leeds and put it round his neck. In another shot he was leaning on a Rolls-Royce; yet another showed him standing in front of his twin decks. This particular photograph was credited as being taken in NY - not the "Big NY", but North Yorkshire - in 1973, a full decade before B-boy style got going in the States.

"Hey Oscar, mate," I said, "come over here a sec will ya, I want to show you something."

The carpet layers were just about to roll out the new red carpet over the fresh underlay. I felt this was an appropriate moment to announce Jimmy Savile as the leading exponent of rap style. Basically, I just wanted to get them all off my case by explaining that, where I came from, people had been dressing like this for years. Well, one had anyway - so, 'ows about that then!

· Taylor-Wood says

'Harland Miller first told me his theory about Jimmy Savile being the prime inspiration for hip-hop fashion a couple of years ago, and I've been trying to get him to write it down ever since. This was the perfect opportunity'

http://www.guardian.co.uk/culture/20.../guesteditors2

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Old 30-05-2013, 04:18 AM   #67773
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Evening Times (Scotland) - May 4, 1965
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...g=4092,302622&

Evening Times (Scotland)
May 4, 1965

JIMMY SAVILE TURNS UP IN GOLD COAT

Cilla Black, Petula Clark and disc jockey Jimmy Savile in a Evening Times £300 gold coat were among guests of honor to-day at a lunch given by the Variety Club of Great Britain at the Dorchester Hotel, London.

The lunch was the club's way of saying thank you to the record industry for support given in its charity work for under-privileged children.

Guests of honour included Georgie Fame, The Searchers, Sandie Shaw, Dickie Valentine, comedian-singer Ken Dodd, band-leaders Stanley Black, Ted Heath, Joe Loss, Mantovani, Victor Sylvester, and disc jockeys Alan Freeman, David Jacobs and Jimmy Young.

There were veteran performers, among them Max Bacon, Issy Bonn, and Bob and Alf Pearson.

Petula Clark flew over specially from France with her husband.


The menu was written on round gold-coloured discs.

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...g=4092,302622&

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Old 30-05-2013, 04:27 AM   #67774
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Evening Times (Scotland) - Jan 16, 1975
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...=4595,2498647&

Evening Times
Jan 16, 1975
Gipsies honor Jimmy Savile

Disc jockey Jimmy Savile has been made a life member of the Gipsy Council - the first "outsider" to be given the honour.

Jimmy, whose recent BBC Radio 1 programme "Speakeasy" was devoted to gipsies, said yesterday - "I decided to accept because the way gipsies live is so akin to my way of life - I'm always on the move."


http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...=4595,2498647&

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Old 30-05-2013, 04:36 AM   #67775
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Quote:
Originally Posted by troyhand View Post
The Glasgow Herald - Aug 1, 1977
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...=6412,6714021&

The Glasgow Herald
August 1, 1977

"Jimmy Savile injured"

Jimmy Savile was in hospital with a suspected broken ankle last night after stumbling during a six-mile mountain charity walk near Glencoe.

The disc jockey, who had been late for the walk in the forest of Glenachulish, was running to catch up with scores of children when he tripped.

But he carried on for two more miles to the finish with a badly swollen ankle and leaning on the shoulder of Mr Bruce James, a local climbing instructor.

Jimmy said: "I've done hundreds of sponsored walks and had 107 professional wrestling fights without anything like this. It's ridiculous."

Earlier, he had run in a 2000ft. race half way up Ben Nevis, followed by a 13-mile sponsored walk at Fort William.

He drove off last night for treatment at Belford Hospital, Fort William, and said he would take part in another 14-mile walk at Kilsyth, Stirlingshire, today.

...
Article directly below Jimmy Savile article above!

...
Woman attacked

Police in Dunfries were yesterday searching for a man who assaulted a disabled middle-aged woman in the grounds of the Crichton Royal Hospital, Dumfries.

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...=6412,6714021&

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/ukne...n-Glencoe.html

Sir Jimmy runs into trouble in Glencoe
THE veteran DJ Sir Jimmy Savile brought a historic Scottish tourist village almost to a halt after mistakenly filling the water tank of his camper van with petrol.

He had not used the van for so long that he forgot which tank was which and the fuel spilled all over the garage forecourt.

Police and fire brigade were called to the Claymore petrol station in Glencoe, vehicles were banned from entering until the spill was cleaned up, and passing drivers had to slow down until they were safely past the scene.

Sir Jimmy explained yesterday: "I nearly brought the whole place to a standstill. I wanted to fill up my camper van with petrol before I left Glencoe to go to Fort William for the Lochaber Highland Games, of which I'm the honorary chieftain.

"Unfortunately I forgot which side the petrol tank was on and I stuck the hose in the fresh water tank. It totally overflowed on to the forecourt and I found I was walking around in petrol.

"I stopped the pump, went into the garage and said to the two ladies there, 'I think we have a problem'." He added: "I asked the emergency services if I could help. They suggested I went to Land's End."

The spill was cleared up in a couple of hours and a breakdown truck took Sir Jimmy's van away and cleaned it up.

He later made it to Fort William in time for the weekend games. He marked the event - his 29th as chieftain - by wearing a £750 new tartan tracksuit

But until the water tank has been properly disinfected, Sir Jimmy admits he might have to give up his trademark cigar while in the camper van.

He said: "It's safer if I don't smoke inside the van for a couple of months."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/ukne...n-Glencoe.html

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Old 30-05-2013, 04:53 AM   #67776
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http://www.guardian.co.uk/g2/story/0...178381,00.html

The Guardian
Tuesday 11 April 2000

In bed with Jimmy

DJ, marathon man, Top of the Pops presenter and, most famously, fixer. For six decades Jimmy Savile has been an icon of the barmy and bizarre. But is he also an egomaniacal bruiser, as a new documentary suggests? Interview by Simon Hattenstone

'Jimmy Savile? The Jimmy Savile? No. He's not here," says the 7ft giant on the hotel door. Everything's larger than life in Jimmy's world. "I've met Jimmy Savile, and mark my words if he was here you'd know about it. We'd all know about it." The hotel looks as if it closed decades ago, and the giant thunders around the lobby. Wrong hotel? Wrong day? Half an hour later, he returns. "He's in the guest room," he shouts. "Been there all the time." He gives me a look.

Sir Jimmy, 73, is lying on the bed decked out in the customary jewels and jingoistic tracksuit. Head back, platinum hair swimming round his shoulders, hyperbolic cigar poking towards heaven. Age has exaggerated his cartoon features - part Worzel Gummidge, part Woody Allen - but he is largely unchanged.

We're here to talk about a documentary Louis Theroux has made about him. Perhaps it's surprising that he's agreed to promote the film. Savile emerges as loveably strange at best; an egomaniacal, evasive bruiser at worst. But he has always surprised us.

Jimmy Savile has been a bizarre icon for six decades. Miner, wrestler, cycle racer, dancehall manager, marathon man, Britain's first DJ, Mensa member, book reviewer, Top of the Pops presenter, fundraiser extraordinaire, and perhaps most famously the fixer, the man who would one day realise our childhood dreams. Savile rises from the bed to tell an anecdote from his book-reviewing days. "After a couple of weeks I said, 'I want to expose a book. It's for children and it's dreadful; there's this girl who's well underage and she takes up with a geezer who's yonks old and eventually they schlep off together.' "

What's the book?

"Wait a minute because you're the audience now," Savile chides. "Now bear in mind this was live TV, and I'm saying, personally, I don't think it's a good thing because I don't think an underage girl should be exhorted by her parents to strike up a relationship with a guy five, six, seven times older than she is. And the book - Peter Pan! I got the sack for that." He loves the story, laughs himself silly and hops back on to bed.

Peter Pan. Could be the story of his life. Back in the 70s when Savile was the voice of youth, surrounded by screaming young gals and presenting Top of the Pops hanging upside down or dressed in a suit of bananas, he was already close on 50.


Has he ever considered cutting his hair? "No. It's great fun. The common denominator for me has always been fun. Most people have got an angle, a hustle, they want something from somebody, and with respect I don't really want anything from anybody because I'm a survivor and self-punter. So I can afford to have a good time even if the guy comes back with a knocking thing..." Savile has always talked in self-made aphorisms. Put together a handful of aphorisms and you get a complex mantra. The flash showbiz softie happily coexists with the ascetic loner.

The huge double bed looks so tempting, I ask Jimmy whether he minds if I join him. "You sit on the end otherwise it will look as..." He looks discombobulated. I tell him not to be so squeamish, that if we go head to toe no one's going to talk. He's happy with that.

He explains what a self-punter is. No manager, no agent, no secretary, no nothing. In the 50s, when Savile was running dancehalls in the north, he earned himself a reputation as a hard man. Savile, the most Jewish Catholic you'll ever meet, asks me if I've been to Israel, and whether I've heard of a sabra - a pear that's prickly on the outside and soft and sweet on the inside. That's me, he says. Is he physically tough? "If you look at the athletics of it, I've done over 300 professional bike races, 212 marathons and 107 pro fights." He proudly announces that he lost 35 of his first 35 fights. "No wrestler wanted to go back home and say a long-haired disc jockey had put him down. So from start to finish I got a good hiding. I've broken every bone in my body. I loved it."

The creepiest moment in the documentary occurs late at night when he thinks the camera is off, and he talks about the dancehall days. "I wouldn't stand for any nonsense whatsoever. Ever, ever. I never threw anybody out. Tied them up and put them down in the bloody boiler house until I was ready for them. Two o'clock in the fucking morning... We'd tie em up and then we'd come back and I was the judge, jury and executioner. If a copper came and said 'You were a bit heavy with those two guys', I'd say 'Your daughter comes in here, she's 16, she's not supposed to come into town. Presumably you'd like me to look after her. If you don't want me to look after her, tell me and I'll let them dirty slags do what they want to her.' "

When Theroux questioned him the next day, Savile said he was talking metaphorically. I ask him again what he meant. "With words. I tied them up with words. I would never tie anybody up," he says. I tell him I don't believe him. "Some of my people might have done." How long were they tied up for? "Noooooooah. I forget now. How long does it take to eat? We discussed things." Savile likes to refer to himself as the Godfather.

He says the dirty slags weren't the wide boys - lovely, harmless lads. They were the drug dealers who flogged purple hearts for sixpence each. He squeezes his eyes shut and whispers in a menacing staccato: "If those people wanted to sell drugs, so be it, but it must not happen in my place. All there is to it. No arguments. I invented zero tolerance."

Savile says he is unchanged since the days when he was a broke young man cycling 1,200 miles up and down Britain with 75p in his pockets. Even then he was flash. And now he can afford to be flash he still lives the spartan life - a single biscuit in his fridge, one pair of underpants when he travels (he washes them every night). It's the same self-denying exhibitionist who became a television star. "I've never worn make-up on TV. I would hate an engineering job to make me look like Richard Gere and when people saw you in the street they'd say, 'Ooh, you're a horrible-looking bastard in real life. People used to say, 'You've got to wear make-up on TV', and I'd say, 'Piss off, I'm not wearing nothing.' "

The diamond-encrusted gold bracelet looks tempting. A series of Ss snake their way round his arm. I ask whether I can have a go. He hands the bracelet over and clasps it to my wrist. What's it worth? "Worth? I don't know. It's a bit of fun. Probably 20 grand."

He says he has always been too busy having fun to embrace a conventional life. When he talks about women, girls, he often mentions brain damage in the same breath. "Nooooaah. That's a generalism," he protests. "My logic has always been to sip at the cup of life and never gulp at it. Now ladies, God bless them. Marvellous . Lovely. If you sip at them. They will enjoy you enormously, you will enjoy them enormously. Then you go to bed on your own and you wake up not disillusioned. You wake up with no brain damage."

Has he really never spent the night with anybody? "Camping, yes." With a sexual partner? "Not really. No, no, no." I say to him he must have met many women who wanted to gulp at the cup of love, and were upset when they found he wasn't interested in girl friends. "That's right. They did. And I said, 'Hey, what you see is what you get, love. If you don't want no fish and chips tomorrow night that's all right.' "

Savile's cigar looks so tempting. He pulls out an even bigger one for me. I ask whether he had a bad relationship when he was young. "No, you presuppose the answer. I was the youngest of seven: four sisters, two brothers. There was great excitement in the house when they got married. The big day dawned and there was a bloody dress, people weeping and lovey-dovey and all that, and a bit later on, be it a month or a year or whatever, it was all 'he's a bastard' and 'she's a bastard'. I couldn't work out why they ended up wanting to kill each other. Something must have happened. Therefore I wanted no part of it."

The real love of his life has been his mother, the Duchess. He lived with her until she died, wouldn't bring women back to the house because it was disrespectful (though he kept a caravan nearby in case he struck lucky). The Duchess has been dead more than 20 years, but her bedroom is frozen in time. Her clothes hang in the wardrobe, dry-cleaned once a year. Savile says they are better than photographs.

Does he miss her? "No... because I can still communicate. We've got to be careful here because people will say you're into bloody clairvoyants. The short answer would be yes I do, because I still wake up in the morning and think I'd better give her a ring so she doesn't give me a bollocking."

His eyes are squeezed tight. Did she bollock him a lot? "No. I wasn't her favourite. I just happened to be the one that did right for her. Everyone else went off and got married. Total opposites, we were, she disapproved of everything I did, but we turned into best pals. Everyone we bumped into put a mawkish feeling on that as though it's not right that parents should be good pals."

When she died, the papers reported that Jimmy had spent five days with her body. He says the truth is that he didn't bury her for five days because the ground was icy. "I said, yeah, I was with her for five days, and that was like manna from heaven for the newspapers. Suddenly, bloody marvellous, you're sat there like bloody Norman Bates, but that will do. Thank you, good morning."

The press has dogged him for years, determined to pin some nastiness on him. Savile says they have failed miserably. Is he talking about the paedophile rumours? "Yes. Louis raised the subject. 'A lot of people think you're into little girls,' he said. 'No, I told him.' Well why did they think so? It could be that because I know all the pop stars. If a group of girls see me they will come round to ask me questions about their beloved because they know I'm the fella that's with them. From an outside point of view, they'll say 'Look at them young girls clambering round him'. They've got entirely the wrong context. If I said to any of them birds: 'I fancy giving you one', they'd be mortally horrified." He says he started telling people he couldn't stand children in order to deflect the rumours.

From young girls to older ladies. He talks about the 11 successive New Years he spent with Margaret Thatcher at Chequers. He calls it a neighbourly relationship - Chequers is only three miles away from Stoke Mandeville hospital, the beneficiary of much of the £40m he has raised over the decades. Did she scare him? "Not in the slightest. We used to have marvellous arguments."

He talks about the tricks he used to play on her. "Marvellous. Bloody marvellous. Great fun." Did they share the same politics? "Not really. Because politics is, with due respect, a bit of a non-event for me. People who are affected by politics fly at 747 level; I fly at Concorde level. Even when I was skint I flew at Concorde level, so what happens down here don't mean shit to me."

Time is drawing on. He says, "Well, why not stay for the interview with the Scotsman?" He tells me that one of his great disappointments is that he could never keep his dad in luxury. "See, the Duchess had 16 years of marvellous life. My dad never earned more than three quid a week. Miracle people. Miracle people." He says he hasn't a clue how much he's worth, nor does he care so long as he's got "all these pensions going chunky chunky, chinky chinky, chonky chonk".

The Scotsman from the Scotsman doesn't want me to stay. Jimmy relieves me of his bracelet and says, actually, I would have been better off with the Rolex, which is worth a hundred grand.

He jumps off the bed and says he doesn't feel his age, never has done. "I once said to a girl, 'I'm older than your grandfather.' And she says, 'Well I love him as well.' I say, 'Good-oh, but I'm still too old for you', and she says, 'No, you're not because you're ageless, you're you.' Now that didn't come from me, it comes from someone else. So when people say to me, 'Don't you think you're too old to do this?', I say I'm doing what I'm doing cos I'm having a good time and why don't you piss off to leave me to do it."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/g2/story/0...178381,00.html

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Old 30-05-2013, 05:05 AM   #67777
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http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/e...re/4433478.stm

Town honours Sir Jimmy as freeman
Sunday, 13 November 2005, 15:39 GMT

Council leaders in Scarborough have "fixed it" for Sir Jimmy Savile to be made an honorary freeman of the town.

The veteran DJ and TV presenter is from Leeds but has had a home in the North Yorkshire resort for nearly 40 years.

"He developed a special relationship with Scarborough on childhood holidays and has been an energetic publicist for the town," a council spokesman said.


"To make someone an honorary freeman is the greatest mark of respect that a council can bestow on an individual."

The honour is also being awarded to former Mayor of Scarborough Alderman Bernard Bosomworth who has dedicated most of his working life to local government in the area.

Another former mayor of the resort, Mrs Elizabeth Mackenzie, and Chris Wilby, executive director of the town's YMCA, will also became freemen at a special meeting of the borough council in the town hall on Monday.


http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/e...re/4433478.stm
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Old 30-05-2013, 05:18 AM   #67778
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The Glasgow Herald - May 31, 1972
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...=6062,6166861&

"Pipes greet Savile at end of travels"

Jimmy Savile, the disc jockey, who has been cycling from Land's End to John 'O Groats in aid of the Royal National Life-Boat Institution and other charities, yesterday reached his goal.

Before he left on the last lap of his ten-day journey, Mr Noss Clyne, chairman of the Wick lifeboat committee, conferred on him honorary membership of the committee.


Mr Savile received a tie and badge from Mr Clyne, who told him: - "We appreciate all you have done for the service."

The disc jockey who is a member of the crew of Beaumaris lifeboat, replied: - "I shall treasure the honour. It represents a very noble and vital service."

PIPED HOME

In brilliant sunshine he reached John o' Groats where a cheering crowd waited while a piper played at the end of the 957-mile journey.

Mr John Sinclair, Lord Lieutenant of Caithness, welcomed Mr Savile and presented him with a sheepskin rug, a cookery book, and a goblet made at the local glassworks.

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...=6062,6166861&

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Old 30-05-2013, 05:32 AM   #67779
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Evening Times - Aug 29, 1988
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...=2236,6784249&

HOSPITAL JOB FOR SAVILE

Jimmy Savile has been appointed to a new task force responsible for the management of Broadmoor Hospital - but he denied today it had anything to do with a nurses' dispute there.

A day overtime ban has left patients in seclusion for long periods.

The local management board has been suspended and from Thursday the special task force - Savile, a top doctor and a leading professor - will oversee the running of the hospital at Crowthorne, Berks.


http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...=2236,6784249&

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Old 30-05-2013, 05:41 AM   #67780
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http://www.heraldscotland.com/sport/...style-1.282869

The Herald Scotland
Thursday 8 July 1999

Prince has poached salmon Scots style


SOME fishy business went on yesterday when the Prince of Wales sat down to salmon on a visit to Sir Jimmy Savile's cottage in Glencoe - the king of fish is understood to have been illegally poached.

Asked about the prank played on the unwitting prince, Sir Jimmy would only say afterwards: ''Would I do that? Well I never. Dearie me.''

The three women who prepared the meal - Julie Ferguson, Katie McDonald, and Roz Moores - were equally coy. ''We don't want to end up in the tower,'' one said.


However, Mrs Ferguson said: ''A kind man came to the cottage door the other night to say he heard the prince was coming for a meal and he was sure Charles would like a fresh salmon.''

Asked if the visitor was a renowned local poacher, she said: ''It was dark and his face was in shadow so I could not possibly say. Just let's say we Fort William girls have our contacts.''


Sir Jimmy, 72, said: ''I got quite a fright when I went into the bathroom this morning and there in the bath was the salmon. It gave me a sad look. I think it must have known its fate was to end up on the dinner plate.''

As well as some of the 10lb baked salmon, the prince also had a taste of heather-fed lamb.

He was in the area to hand over a minibus to the Glencoe Mountain Rescue team on behalf of the Order of St John.

Sir Jimmy said: ''Over the years I've had quite a few nosh-ups with the royals and thought it was time I returned the hospitality, so I invited Charles along here after his official duties were over.''

Sir Jimmy's cottage is named Alt-na-Reigh or Kings Water. He said: ''Another historic name for the cottage is House of Bad Men. I wasn't around 700 years ago when there was first a dwelling on the site, so I'm afraid I can't tell you how it got this unusual name.''

http://www.heraldscotland.com/sport/...style-1.282869

Last edited by troyhand; 30-05-2013 at 05:42 AM.
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