Go Back   David Icke's Official Forums > Main Forums > Survival / Local Economies / Communities

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 28-02-2017, 01:40 PM   #1
the apprentice
Inactive
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 22,637
Likes: 2,987 (2,092 Posts)
Default How does your garden grow

Over the next several months I have decided to show the world my tiny corner of Eden, right now it's all ready prepared for the growing season to begin. The road seen in the background leads to Culloden Tower to the right.

If your in the area there is an open footpath around the grounds and I will most likely be in the garden throughout summer.

Right now there is very little to see bar about a hundred leeks and onions that have over wintered and a few dozen wire cages that we use to protect the plantlet's from Mr & Mrs pigeon, who would decimate them in a matter of hours if left unprotected.

photo hosting

To the right of the plot is an old stand of around 70 raspberry canes which were left overs from the last war allotments that came in mighty handy as they do now for the locals. These produced 45 lbs of fruit last year.

Right in front is my strawberry box 7 by 1 metre where we got 52 jars of jam from last year, this needs a haircut to remove the dead leaves before the plants begin to flower, then we cover them using wired frames I made to stop the squirrels from eating the fruit before they ripen.

In the garden we also have an old pear tree and an apple which has slowly recovered from being blown down three years ago.

The small triangle of land herein was once the home of the Yorke Family who had a substantial country house on the site, now missing after being demolished in 1820's. My section which is one of ten is located right about where their main living room was situated.

In the grounds of Temple Lodge is Culloden Tower.

See the area here, when you see the tower, the drone is exactly 300 feet over our garden.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=zWNadNc-lkg

https://historicengland.org.uk/listi...-entry/1001317

http://www.fabulousfollies.net/richmond.html

The whole area is strewn with what are the remains of the old house foundations and paths just under the surface but in between is some very fine river side soil to grow the best vedge.

Keep watching and thanks for looking in.

Last edited by the apprentice; 28-02-2017 at 02:12 PM.
the apprentice is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-02-2017, 04:08 PM   #2
thoreau
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 2,762
Likes: 291 (137 Posts)
Default

I have moved so am starting from scratch in the garden again - look forward to seeing how yours grows - fingers crossed I can get something growing in mine - last year was quite the slog! - when I moved in it had no drainage and was covered in dips and craters, overgrown with weeds, brambles and ivy and the shed was missing a roof On the plus side it is south facing so has lots of sun and isn't too big.

I want to make the front garden productive too so any tips on what to grow in almost constant shade are appreciated
__________________
Go confidently in the direction of your dreams! Live the life you’ve imagined.HENRY DAVID THOREAU
Strong minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, weak minds discuss people - Socrates
No amount of security is worth the suffering of a mediocre life chained to a routine that has killed your dreams - Maya Mendoza
Likes: (1)
thoreau is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-02-2017, 04:18 PM   #3
grandmasterp
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: The SkegVegas Coast
Posts: 31,797
Likes: 2,580 (1,693 Posts)
Default

Irises and first tete a tete daffodils plus snowdrops are merrily flowering in our garden.
Spring begins officially tomorrow in the UK.
Before we downsized we grew most of our own veg.
Now we don't do much at all in veg but will have some runner beans in 3-cane big pots this year plus maybe some potatoes grown in bags.
Likes: (2)
grandmasterp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-02-2017, 04:22 PM   #4
grandmasterp
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: The SkegVegas Coast
Posts: 31,797
Likes: 2,580 (1,693 Posts)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by thoreau View Post
I have moved so am starting from scratch in the garden again - look forward to seeing how yours grows - fingers crossed I can get something growing in mine - last year was quite the slog! - when I moved in it had no drainage and was covered in dips and craters, overgrown with weeds, brambles and ivy and the shed was missing a roof On the plus side it is south facing so has lots of sun and isn't too big.

I want to make the front garden productive too so any tips on what to grow in almost constant shade are appreciated

Brassicas like shade plus most saladings.
Too much sun on those and they bolt to seed.
Our last place when we moved in had a shady lawn area doing nowt so I rotavated it up.
I put red second earlies potatoes in the first year and never had better spuds.
Ground that hasn't had veg in before generally does well.
Likes: (2)
grandmasterp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-02-2017, 04:29 PM   #5
the apprentice
Inactive
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 22,637
Likes: 2,987 (2,092 Posts)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by thoreau View Post
I have moved so am starting from scratch in the garden again - look forward to seeing how yours grows - fingers crossed I can get something growing in mine - last year was quite the slog! - when I moved in it had no drainage and was covered in dips and craters, overgrown with weeds, brambles and ivy and the shed was missing a roof On the plus side it is south facing so has lots of sun and isn't too big.

I want to make the front garden productive too so any tips on what to grow in almost constant shade are appreciated
One good thing with fallow ground is, nature has a wonderful way of revitalising the soil using weeds that fix enough starch and energy back into the soil so they can survive next year.

If it's brambles then ten years idle and the ground will be rich in nutrients and you shouldn't need to add any organic manure for three years or more. After then you can either carry on without any manures and add a light covering of compost. But after nineteen years or so of heavy cropping the soil will be exhausted and need some serious charging.

Another good addition into the soil is wood charcoal, this acts as a carbon sync which absorbs Co2 due to it being heavier than air and sinks into the soil.

Aim for a good tilth of about four inches deep, this is where most vegetable roots are at as they mature, no deeper then you keep the goodies where they are truly needed.

I use organic manure pellets chicken version is a powerful infusion.

For your front garden I would plant herbs in Borders then people are unlikely to pinch them, if we planted things like straw's they would slowly vanish around here, camomile borders are quite nice and make a lawn very fragrant.







picture hosting

The greenhouse also doubles as an ideal drying room, saves a ton of electric when not using the electric drier.

Built this one myself, Dutch style for 600 and saved 2100, two sliding doors.

Notice the winter herbs in the greenhouse.

The mini shed has an open side to prevent the heat from cooking the small seedlings and plantlet's.

What we did with our second small shed was fit a plastic roof and a high shelf so it was good for bringing on seedlings in the smaller space which warms up much faster, but cold frames are a must if you have limited space, then as the plants are ready you can move them out of the way or simply remover the lids and let the plants grow behind and inside the frame for added protection.

If you deposit all of your vedge peelings in a ready dug trench and cover them as you go in layers this makes a good area for peas, this is called the Indo Technique, add a few pellets and banana skins but NOT citrus type skins from oranges etc as they are acidic.

After a lengthy break from gardening during our military years we are now back at it solid for eight years and the food is fabulous to say the least.

Last year we spent so much time in the garden that folks thought I had just come back from Africa I was so tanned.

One little bit of advice, try not to rush nature on, let it dictate germination in season and tubing ed to the available climate.

Last edited by the apprentice; 28-02-2017 at 04:53 PM.
the apprentice is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-02-2017, 04:41 PM   #6
thoreau
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 2,762
Likes: 291 (137 Posts)
Default

Thank you both look forward to picking brains and sharing pictures over the year - The last place I lived has a massive communal garden from which produce was shared - this time its all on me eek!

Shall most definitely be taking your advice
__________________
Go confidently in the direction of your dreams! Live the life you’ve imagined.HENRY DAVID THOREAU
Strong minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, weak minds discuss people - Socrates
No amount of security is worth the suffering of a mediocre life chained to a routine that has killed your dreams - Maya Mendoza
Likes: (1)
thoreau is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-02-2017, 04:51 PM   #7
the apprentice
Inactive
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 22,637
Likes: 2,987 (2,092 Posts)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by grandmasterp View Post
Irises and first tete a tete daffodils plus snowdrops are merrily flowering in our garden.
Spring begins officially tomorrow in the UK.
Before we downsized we grew most of our own veg.
Now we don't do much at all in veg but will have some runner beans in 3-cane big pots this year plus maybe some potatoes grown in bags.
One of our friends in the mid West USA has just mailed us, they already have almonds and peaches in flower and have already ploughed two weeks early, his bees are already buzzing and the boxes are full, ours have yet to wake up.
Likes: (2)
the apprentice is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2017, 02:51 PM   #8
the apprentice
Inactive
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 22,637
Likes: 2,987 (2,092 Posts)
Default

It was a nice sunny day today a bit windy and still cool but I spent three hours in the garden and finally dug and weeded the remaining areas.

When you dig at this time of year try to dig the largest worms back under, these are your breeding stock and nature's unpaid servants that convert the organics back into soil.

Turn your old brassica leaves into the soil too the worms will enjoy these, so many folks, or as I call them black gardeners remove everything and rake the soil down into fine crumble that will eventually break down into finer and finer dust and eventually blow away. Having larger clumps also helps to retain the moisture too.

Over the years we have dug in copious amounts of wood charcoal that was left over as cinders from our wood stove, this is ideal for retaining Co2 into the ground and how the Amazonians did things to create the best growing medium in the world, Co2 is heavier than air thus sinks into the soil if it is well tilled.

Try to leave the soil in larger clumps so that the late frosts can get down into it at any exposed slug and snails eggs.

I scattered some good quality chicken pellets over the whole area today which fall into the voids after digging, this let's them break down at different depths so the injection of nitrogen and phosphate in the manure, then it dosen't get concentrated into one solid layer.

If your a heavy cropper the ground needs organics about every third year to keep things in top order, top being top soil.







We live right next to a large deciduous forest here and it's a must to have these small round wire cages to prevent the wood pigeons from decimating our newly planted crops, if they hatch their young at the same time they will scoff the bloody lot. But we do leave the old broccoli plants in throughout the winter which they feed from throughout.

The wire cages work out at 60 pence each when cut from a larger roll costing about a tenner and will last at least 20 years if you buy the good quality galvanised. But you can still use the cheaper rounded rabbit wire type.

The spade and fork were purchased here

www.implementations.co.uk.

If we work together with nature it can benefit us both by the pigeons eating the slug eggs and other detrimental pests, so you have to protect against damage but also allow then access to do their bit.


free upload

Here is the community raspberry patch with this year's canes already sprouting, which grew last year. By the end of June they will be drooping under the weight of fruit almost down to the ground, if you don't tie them to the wires between the posts Mr & Mrs blackbird will decimate them for dessert.

image hosting over 10mb

Notice I don't clear the ground of grass around the canes, we let the wild vetch grow in between which is a good nitrogen fixer and prevents the soil from drying out, the vetch also attracts the bees to the plot so we get an added bounty in the way of honey.






image upload no compression

Above is a couple of settles/seats as we call them that I made last season for the community, I call this quiet corner the allotment parliament where other gardeners come to share ideas and talk about the vagaries of the weather and the politics of nature. They are made from roofing lathes and birch ply side panels.

Also Bill and Ben our bespoke spade and fork made in Hungary, these are the Rolls Royce of gardening tools, as you use them they leave tiny trace elements of copper behind in the soil which really detter ther slugs and snails, and after five years of constant use I can say this theory really does work, our slug problem is always far less of a problem than anyone else's in the community.

print screen windows 7

The Round Table, the time today 2.30 pm Earth time, notice the ecliptic curve drawn by the sun itself at 23.4°

image url upload

We have had a lot of trouble this year with Yorkshire Miners or Mr Mole, here is the tell tale sign of the mole catcher peeping above the soil, if you don't do this the plants will suffer from their handiwork by undermining the roots leaving them without any soil around them, which eventually starves them of sustinance killing your plants, so there comes a time when you have to take action.

how do i print screen

Our rhubarb is well through in the last three days, in another month these two large corms will be knee high and the smell of crumble and cream will be wafting around the house with some nice early baby sticks, Mnnnnnnn.

Thanks for looking in, now all we need is some sun.

Last edited by the apprentice; 02-03-2017 at 06:50 PM.
the apprentice is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2017, 06:17 PM   #9
roastpotatoes
Inactive
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 4,307
Likes: 5,432 (2,533 Posts)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by the apprentice View Post
It was a nice sunny day today a bit windy and still cool but I spent three hours in the garden and finally dug and weeded the remaining areas.

When you dig at this time of year try to dig the largest worms back under, these are your breeding stock and nature's unpaid servants that convert the organics back into soil.

Turn your old brassica leaves into the soil too the worms will enjoy these, so many folks, or as I call them black gardeners remove everything and rake the soil down into fine crumble that will eventually break down into finer and finer ust and eventually blow away. Having larger clumps also helps to retain the moisture too.

Over the years we have dug in copious amounts of wood charcoal that was left over as cinders from our wood stove, this is ideal for retaining Co2 into the ground and how the Amazonian did things to create the best growing medium in the world, Co2 is heavier than air thus sinks into the soil if it is well tilled.

Try to leave the soil in larger clumps so that the late frosts can get down into it at any slug eggs.

I scattered some good quality chicken pellets over the whole area today which fall into the voids after digging, this let's them break down at different depths so the injection of nitrogen and phosphate in the manure, then it dosen't get concentrated into one solid layer.

If your a heavy cropper the ground needs organics about every third year to keep things in top order, top being top soil.







We live right next to a large deciduous forest here and it's a must to have these small round wire cages to prevent the wood pigeons from decimating our newly planted crops, if they hatch their young at the same time they will scoff the bloody lot. But we do leave the old broccoli plants in throughout the winter which they feed from throughout.

The wire cages work out at 60 pence each when cut from a larger roll costing about a tenner and will last at least 20 years if you buy the good quality galvanised. But you can still use the cheaper rounded rabbit wire type.

The spade and fork were purchased here

www.implementations.co.uk.

If we work together with nature it can benefit us both by the pigeons eating the slug eggs and other detrimental pests, so you have to protect against damage but also allow then access to do their bit.


free upload

Here is the community raspberry patch with this year's canes already planting, which grew last year. By the end of June they will be drooping under the weight of fruit almost down to the ground, if you don't tie them to the wires between the posts, and Mr & Mrs blackbird will decimate them for dessert.

image hosting over 10mb

Notice I don't clear the ground of grass around the canes, we let the wild vetch grow in between which is a good nitrogen fixer and prevents the soil from drying out, the vetch also attracts the bees to the plot so we get an added bounty in the way of honey.






image upload no compression

Above is a couple of settles as we call them that I made last season for the community, I call this quiet corner the allotment parliament where other gardeners come to share ideas and talk about the vagaries of the weather and the politics of nature. They are made from roofing lathes and birch ply side panels.

Also Bill and Ben our bespoke spade and fork made in Hungary, these are the Rolls Royce of gardening tools, as you use them they leave tiny trace elements of copper behind in the soil which really detter ther slugs and snails, and after five years of constant use I can say this theory really does work, our slug problem is always far less of a problem than anyone else's in the community.

print screen windows 7

The Round Table, the time today 2.30 pm Earth time, notice the ecliptic curve drawn by the sun itself at 23.4°

image url upload

We have had a lot of trouble this year with Yorkshire Miners or Mr Mole, here is the tell tale sign of the mole catcher peeping above the soil, if you don't do this the plants will suffer from their handiwork by undermining the roots leaving them without any soil around them, which eventually starves them of sustinance killing your plants, so there comes a time when you have to take action.

how do i print screen

Our rhubarb is well through in the last three days, in another month these two large corms will be knee high and the smell of crumble and cream will be wafting around the house with some nice early baby sticks, Mnnnnnnn.

Thanks for looking in, now all we need is some sun.
Your post reminds me of Sunday lunch and rhubarb crumble. My Dad, a keen gardener like me used to grow rhubarb ... I must grow more fruit and vegetables.

I still make a proper Sunday lunch, not for any religious reason, but to bring the family together whenever possible.
Likes: (1)
roastpotatoes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2017, 06:35 PM   #10
the apprentice
Inactive
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 22,637
Likes: 2,987 (2,092 Posts)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by roastpotatoes View Post
Your post reminds me of Sunday lunch and rhubarb crumble. My Dad, a keen gardener like me used to grow rhubarb ... I must grow more fruit and vegetables.

I still make a proper Sunday lunch, not for any religious reason, but to bring the family together whenever possible.
Cool.

Food together used to be a time of escape from the pressures of the weeks and seasons, where families used to talk about their problems and I think eventually these traditions will eventually return.

A film about the seasons and the family.

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xob...ing_shortfilms
Likes: (1)
the apprentice is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2017, 03:54 PM   #11
the apprentice
Inactive
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 22,637
Likes: 2,987 (2,092 Posts)
Default

Another couple of hours in Eden and haircutting the strawberry bed. I removed all the old growth and any leaves and ones that were going yellow.

This let the air into the bottom so the sun can warm up the soil and begin the transpiration process. Tug swiftly on the runners and leaves to remove the old dead leaves and if any pull out trim the leaves and new plantlet's and replace them again so they have a better purchase in the soil.

Save all the new plantlet's from last years runners into a nursery bed or you can barter or swap them for something else.

The pictures below show the before and after results and the area good to go forward and preduce this year's fruit. If you have good roots the plantlets could well fruit this season.










uploading pictures

Thanks for watching.

Last edited by the apprentice; 05-03-2017 at 03:55 PM.
Likes: (1)
the apprentice is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2017, 04:33 PM   #12
the apprentice
Inactive
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 22,637
Likes: 2,987 (2,092 Posts)
Default

Another really warm day today, it got up to a 100 in the greenhouse at about 3 of clock, so her in doors got the first seedlings pricked into trays.

I sieved about half a ton of compost from last year's weeds with some help from a fellow allotmenteer, for which I was very grateful, here is the very best compost and a huge saving to bank.

Got all the strawberries cleared and trimmed and ready for another season and covered the frame to stop Mr Squirrel from getting at them, the little buggers eat them while they are still green just before they ripen, they also build circles of them hidden beneath the leaves by biting them off so they don't ripen, hundreds if you let them. They will do the same to the gooseberries too on a hard winter and poor start.

From the srawberr trailers that sprout and run every year I have made another 5 metre bed up against a wall which retains the heat of the day releasing it slowly through the night.





With a bit of luck we might get a few fruits off this new bad if we cover it with wire but a good spring the squirrels don't really bother them, we will have to see how things develop.


image hosting no registration

A good day in Yorkshire today a warmish one under the Damson trees.





The sieve is anot oblong of 1/2" inch square weld mesh secured by two layears of roof lathes and screwed together. We place three spade full of compost and rub it down through the wire using a four pronged manure fork which is really easy work compared to a had sieve.




image upload no size limit

Thanks for looking.

Last edited by the apprentice; 09-03-2017 at 04:46 PM.
Likes: (1)
the apprentice is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-03-2017, 06:12 PM   #13
the apprentice
Inactive
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 22,637
Likes: 2,987 (2,092 Posts)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by the apprentice View Post
Another really warm day today, it got up to a 100 in the greenhouse at about 3 of clock, so her in doors got the first seedlings pricked into trays.

I sieved about half a ton of compost from last year's weeds with some help from a fellow allotmenteer, for which I was very grateful, here is the very best compost and a huge saving to bank.

Got all the strawberries cleared and trimmed and ready for another season and covered the frame to stop Mr Squirrel from getting at them, the little buggers eat them while they are still green just before they ripen, they also build circles of them hidden beneath the leaves by biting them off so they don't ripen, hundreds if you let them. They will do the same to the gooseberries too on a hard winter and poor start.

From the srawberr trailers that sprout and run every year I have made another 5 metre bed up against a wall which retains the heat of the day releasing it slowly through the night.





With a bit of luck we might get a few fruits off this new bad if we cover it with wire but a good spring the squirrels don't really bother them, we will have to see how things develop.


image hosting no registration

A good day in Yorkshire today a warmish one under the Damson trees.





The sieve is anot oblong of 1/2" inch square weld mesh secured by two layears of roof lathes and screwed together. We place three spade full of compost and rub it down through the wire using a four pronged manure fork which is really easy work compared to a had sieve.




image upload no size limit

Thanks for looking.
As few more days into March and all the hard work is over, our covenant of works is complete before the coming equinox.
The compost heap is finally sieved and bagged for potting on later in April.

We got almost two 1 Tony dumpy bags full this year which is not really enough but good enough to save plenty of money buying bought stuff which is not quite as good as your own mix of compost soil and some sand from the riverside.






photo uploading
Likes: (1)
the apprentice is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-03-2017, 01:29 PM   #14
cosmic tramp
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 5,900
Likes: 2,707 (1,758 Posts)
Default

Very impressive but where's your compost bin mister apprentice ... I don't see one ? It's one aspect of gardening upon which I'm very well read and I've got a bit of a 'thing' about it ... nature's very own delicatessen, worm sanctuary and natural recycling centre.

Also have you applied Nasturtium technology yet - my favourite flower, grows in poor soil, beautiful flower heads, self propagating, edible peppery salad leaves ( also a favourite for rabbits and guinea pigs) and also a secret weapon against predatory insects for your fruit and veggies. Besides attracting bumble bees and butterflies they also act as a 24/7 fast food restaurant for blackfly who swarm to them. "Yuk ! Who wants blackfly ?" I hear you ask and rightly so, well the thing is, if you embroider all your veggie patches with rows of Nasturtium flowers, besides turning it into an artistic riot of colours: yellows, oranges, reds and purples. you should find that any blackfly and greenfly won't bother your edibles at all as they'll be drawn to the easier succulent Nasturtium stalks.

Best day to plant seeds (fingernail deep) is May 1st.

PM me and I'll send you a packet of my own free, gratis and fer nowt.

Last edited by cosmic tramp; 14-03-2017 at 01:32 PM.
cosmic tramp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-03-2017, 03:42 PM   #15
the apprentice
Inactive
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 22,637
Likes: 2,987 (2,092 Posts)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cosmic tramp View Post
Very impressive but where's your compost bin mister apprentice ... I don't see one ? It's one aspect of gardening upon which I'm very well read and I've got a bit of a 'thing' about it ... nature's very own delicatessen, worm sanctuary and natural recycling centre.

Also have you applied Nasturtium technology yet - my favourite flower, grows in poor soil, beautiful flower heads, self propagating, edible peppery salad leaves ( also a favourite for rabbits and guinea pigs) and also a secret weapon against predatory insects for your fruit and veggies. Besides attracting bumble bees and butterflies they also act as a 24/7 fast food restaurant for blackfly who swarm to them. "Yuk ! Who wants blackfly ?" I hear you ask and rightly so, well the thing is, if you embroider all your veggie patches with rows of Nasturtium flowers, besides turning it into an artistic riot of colours: yellows, oranges, reds and purples. you should find that any blackfly and greenfly won't bother your edibles at all as they'll be drawn to the easier succulent Nasturtium stalks.

Best day to plant seeds (fingernail deep) is May 1st.

PM me and I'll send you a packet of my own free, gratis and fer nowt.

The compost heap is here next to the wheelbarrow.

https://postimg.org/image/90afmgu6x/

It has four scaffold planks at the back and removable sides and covered with a good layer of wool carpets to get the heat into it.

We normally plant marigolds in between our vedge which adds a splash of colour for the minds eye as well as the body.

We got two tone of compost this time which we scatter over the whole area and use as a 50-50 mix for potting on.

We have so many worms in our vedge patch that there is hardly any need to dig, these unpaid servants of nature really earn their keep around here.

Last edited by the apprentice; 14-03-2017 at 03:44 PM.
Likes: (1)
the apprentice is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-03-2017, 04:33 PM   #16
mollymag4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 664
Likes: 553 (322 Posts)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cosmic tramp View Post
Very impressive but where's your compost bin mister apprentice ... I don't see one ? It's one aspect of gardening upon which I'm very well read and I've got a bit of a 'thing' about it ... nature's very own delicatessen, worm sanctuary and natural recycling centre.

Also have you applied Nasturtium technology yet - my favourite flower, grows in poor soil, beautiful flower heads, self propagating, edible peppery salad leaves ( also a favourite for rabbits and guinea pigs) and also a secret weapon against predatory insects for your fruit and veggies. Besides attracting bumble bees and butterflies they also act as a 24/7 fast food restaurant for blackfly who swarm to them. "Yuk ! Who wants blackfly ?" I hear you ask and rightly so, well the thing is, if you embroider all your veggie patches with rows of Nasturtium flowers, besides turning it into an artistic riot of colours: yellows, oranges, reds and purples. you should find that any blackfly and greenfly won't bother your edibles at all as they'll be drawn to the easier succulent Nasturtium stalks.

Best day to plant seeds (fingernail deep) is May 1st.

PM me and I'll send you a packet of my own free, gratis and fer nowt.
Totally agree about nasturtiums. Also, if planted on poor soil, they will do well and therefore become soil enhancers--they take what there is in poor soil, soil which other plants scoff at and develop it into beauty and then you can take them at end of season and compost them--they become a conduit between poor soil and better/enhanced soil. Nature's own little industry to use poor soil to be life enhancing.
mollymag4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-03-2017, 09:08 AM   #17
the apprentice
Inactive
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 22,637
Likes: 2,987 (2,092 Posts)
Default Brrr?rr

After a good start to the spring here in Yorkshire we have taken a step back towards winter, this is what greeted us this morning; a couple of inches of snow which is already beginning to melt but slowly.

image hosting over 5mb

Yet the bird's know it won't last for long and are calling out their territories loudly, at 5.30 am first with Mr Song Thrush and Mr Robin sending their clear message to humanity who were still tucked up between their warm sheets.

Below the snowy roof in the greenhouse our sweet peas are well through and on their way, temp this morning in the greenhouse was 45 and unheated, the snow cover is helping retain the heat.

photo host

This yearly story of the life of a Garden in the dales can be a reminder of the weather throughout a year.

Last edited by the apprentice; 22-03-2017 at 09:18 AM.
Likes: (1)
the apprentice is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-03-2017, 01:22 PM   #18
mollymag4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 664
Likes: 553 (322 Posts)
Default

A friend said to me: To cultivate a garden takes too much time and labour;
I'd rather live next door to one and cultivate my neighbor.
Likes: (1)
mollymag4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-03-2017, 01:27 PM   #19
the apprentice
Inactive
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 22,637
Likes: 2,987 (2,092 Posts)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mollymag4 View Post
A friend said to me: To cultivate a garden takes too much time and labour.
I'd rather live next door to one and cultivate my neighbour.
Well you know what they say, there's nothing like getting down to the knitty gritty and getting your hands dirty.

the apprentice is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-03-2017, 01:32 PM   #20
cosmic tramp
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 5,900
Likes: 2,707 (1,758 Posts)
Default

You could replace those plastic seed trays with cardboard egg boxes which can then be moved wholesale into the allotment where the roots will break through the rotting cardboard.

Put sum buckets with holes in over that Rhubarb and you can force it to Champagne quality (Yorkshire wit & wisdom).

Last edited by cosmic tramp; 22-03-2017 at 01:34 PM.
cosmic tramp is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 10:33 PM.


Shoutbox provided by vBShout (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.