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Old 02-04-2011, 02:51 AM   #101
zmanforever
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No offense why would you put smart bird and smart seagull experiments in here honestly we got Navy laser's crazy other tech, then smart bird... does it smart poop?

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Old 02-04-2011, 03:03 AM   #102
nosferatu_dj
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zmanforever View Post
No offense why would you put smart bird and smart seagull experiments in here honestly we got Navy laser's crazy other tech, then smart bird... does it smart poop?
well i am soooo sorry for not bringing you more interesting information....

dfid u read threw the entire thread??? if you did then you are not conecting the dots....

there is in this thread.... cyborg insect's.... remote controll insects... smart helicopters.... and other kinds of man made flying things.....
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Old 27-07-2011, 10:22 PM   #103
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http://www.popsci.com/technology/art...ombat-vehicles

DARPA's Vehicleforge.mil Aims to Crowd-Source Next-Gen Combat Vehicles

By Clay Dillow Posted 07.27.2011 at 2:01 pm 4 Comments

A Ground Combat Vehicle Concept DARPA via Ares

With the national debt talks moving into day whatever and Congress arguing about how best to fix the budget deficit, the bloated defense budget continues to be a touchy topic in Washington. So perhaps it’s a good thing that DARPA is moving forward with its best effort to mend the broken military procurement process by selecting Vanderbilt University to set up vehicleforge.mil, the new open-source development tool that aims to get everyone involved in designing the next generation of military machinery, a la the FLYPmode. First up: a new ground combat vehicle.
Vehicleforge is the tool that DARPA hopes will make things like XC2V (a.k.a. FLYPmode) a military reality. The FLYPmode, if you missed our previous coverage, is a military concept support vehicle built by Arizona-based Local Motors and presented to President Obama last month amid much fanfare. It was designed by an open online community and built from scratch in just four months, beating the drawing-board-to-prototype time for most military hardware by an eternity or two.


FLYPmode falls under DARPA’s Fast, Adaptive, Next-Generation Ground Combat Vehicle program, which lives under the larger umbrella of the META program--DARPA’s larger initiative to tap open source designs to minimize production times for military vehicles. Vehicleforge will be the place where all that happens, and that starts with creating a place for people to collaborate. The idea is to create a high level “metalanguage” and a library of component parts that the online community can tap into via Vehicleforge, which will also provide the online infrastructure for discussions, design submissions, and the hashing out of design problems. But it won’t just be a space to talk vehicle design. Vehicleforge, as its name implies, will link directly to a reconfigurable “build-to-print” facility that can manufacture different versions of these vehicles.
In other words, where the FLYPmode was a demonstration that crowd-sourcing military vehicles is viable, Vehicleforge will be the place where it becomes a regular thing. A $4.3 million contract to develop the online infrastructure calls for the site to be operational and chock full of component model libraries that designers can access by sometime next year. Design challenges start in 2013, and prototype infantry combat vehicles (like the concept above) could be rolling out of the fabrication facility by fiscal 2014.
[Ares]
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Old 27-07-2011, 10:23 PM   #104
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http://www.popsci.com/technology/art...d-laser-cannon

How to Make a Giant Chain Gun Even Deadlier: Give It a Laser Cannon

By Clay Dillow Posted 07.26.2011 at 11:08 am 23 Comments

BAE/Boeing's Laser Augmented Mk 38 Naval Defense System It's a 25-millimeter chain gun with a laser cannon attached. What's not to like? BAE Systems via Danger Room

BAE System’s Mk 38 chain gun was already a formidable opponent: a 250millimeter cannon capable of putting 180 rounds per minute into the air from the deck of a naval ship, strongly urging those without clearance to keep a safe distance (of about 2,000 yards). But in a tip of the hat toward what the U.S. Navy considers the future of shipboard defense, BAE and Boeing have teamed up to accessorize the Mk 38 with a laser death ray. You know, just in case.
Yesterday, the two defense contractors announced that they are jointly developing a demonstration model Mk 38 with dual capabilities. The chain gun--originally designed to be manually aimed and fired--will now be remote-controlled and use an electro-optical/IR sensor ball to detect and track incoming targets, like UAVs or small watercraft (like the one that perpetrated the attack on the USS Cole in Yemen several years ago).


But according to a BAE-Boeing announcement, “the system also provides the ability to deliver different levels of laser energy, depending on the target and mission objectives.” Danger Room tells us that the fiber laser system can pack up to 10 kilowatts of punch, far below what the U.S. military has previously considered weapons grade but nonetheless effective--just a few months ago an Office of Naval Research laser fried the engine of a small watercraft with a 15 kilowatt beam (though that was designed to be scaled up to a more impressive 100 kilowatts). Presumably, the Mk 38’s laser package could be upgraded as well, making the death ray part of the system quite a bit deadlier. Which is good, considering that sea air--rife with moisture and particulate stuff that degrades focused laser beams--compounds the many problems inherent in laser weapons systems.
[Defense Tech, Danger Room]
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Old 24-02-2013, 12:54 AM   #105
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=_5YkQ9w3PJ4

US Air Force Research Laboratory video animation of a flapping-wing micro air vehicle (MAV). AFRL's goal is to develop a bird-sized MAV by 2015 and an insect-sized MAV by 2030. The bird-sized MAV would be air-deployed from a larger UAV so search for weapons of mass destruction, operating semi-autonomously for up to a week.
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Old 09-04-2013, 06:32 AM   #106
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http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2013...arfare-system/

Watch Navy’s New Laser Cannon, Mounted on a Ship, Kill a Drone


The video above is what the Navy’s top officers view as the future of their dominance on the surface of the world’s waterways. A laser cannon, its magazine limited only by the amount of energy pumped into it and costing pocket change to fire, punching through an adversary’s cheap anti-ship weapons — at the speed of light.
Long in testing and even older in ambition, the chief of naval operations, Adm. Jonathan Greenert, triumphantly heralded the dawn age of the shipboard laser gun during the Navy’s annual conference outside Washington. In tests aboard the destroyer USS Dewey last summer off the California coast, the Laser Weapon System successfully shot down surveillance drones and fast boats in its first round of sea trials aboard a surface combatant, according to Rear Adm. Thomas Eccles, one of the Navy’s top engineers. (Three of the shoot-downs were aboard the Dewey, while nine others happened on shore, Eccles clarifies.)
“This system,” Greenert told the naval community at the Sea Air Space conference, showing the above video to a hushed crowd, “it works.”
The tubular Laser Weapon System (LaWS) is a solid-state laser that’s been in development for six years, at a cost of $40 million. It’s a directed-energy descendent of the the radar-guided Close In Weapons System (CIWS; it rhymes with “Gee Whiz”) gun already aboard surface ships. In December, following the successful Dewey tests, Greenert ordered the laser “out to the fleet for an operational demonstration,” said Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder, the Navy’s chief of research. And so next year, LaWS will have its trial by fire, when the Navy puts it on the deck of its new afloat staging base USS Ponce for its maiden voyage to the Middle East — right in Iran’s backyard.

The Laser Weapon System (LaWS), shown here on the guided-missile destroyer USS Dewey. Photo: U.S. Navy

It just so happens that the LaWS’ ability to track and kill surveillance drones and swarming fast boats matches with Iran’s development of surveillance drones and swarming fast-boat tactics. And it just so happens that the Ponce will spend most of 2014 deployed in Iran’s backyard. Neither Klunder nor Eccles will come out and say it exactly, but the maiden deployment of the LaWS has immediate implications for the U.S.’ ongoing sub rosa conflict with the Iranians — and provides a new weapon for the Navy at a time when it’s had to scale back its aircraft carrier presence off of Iran’s shores.
“Any country that operates the kinds of threats this system is designed to deal with should pause and say, ‘If the United States Navy can take a challenge like that and muster the scientific expertise from industry, academia and inside the government and pull together a solution that can be fielded as rapidly as this one’s been fielded, and go from a test environment directly to a forward-deployed unit for demonstration in the field and in the Fifth Fleet,’” Eccles said, “they should recognize that when we say ‘quick-reaction capability’ we truly deliver on a quick reaction capability.”
Within initial limits. The Navy won’t say just how many kilowatts of energy the LaWS’ beam is, but it’s probably under the 100 kilowatts generally considered militarily mature. The fact that LaWS can kill a surveillance drone and a fast-attack boat has more to do with the vulnerabilities of those systems than it its own prowess. It cannot stop an anti-ship missile, and its beam, about the circumference of a dime, will do little more than singe a fighter jet. And there remain significant challenges with cooling a shipboard high-energy laser, a necessary safety feature.
But Greenert, Eccles, and Klunder are confident that the next wave of Navy lasers will be more powerful. The laser programs, long in development, lacked focus for years: should the Navy do the harder work of developing a vastly more powerful Free Electron Laser; or get the less impressive but more practical solid-state lasers into the fleet first? The threat of a congressionally-mandated death helped answer the question in favor of the latter, which use crystals or glass to generate their beams — as did a successful 2011 test with a different laser system on a ship.
Integrate the lasers on ships today, the Navy’s thinking goes, and they’ll become lasting features aboard the cruisers, destroyers, afloat staging bases and other surface ships of the future, in increasingly powerful variants. Sailors on the Ponce will be using the LaWS, not lab technicians, allowing them to generate tactics, techniques and procedures for laser weaponry; and integrating the lasers into the other systems on the ship.
The LaWS presently generates its own power. “As we move into future fielding, the opportunity is there to go into the ship’s power grid,” Eccles says — a key step to eventually scale up to a megawatt’s worth of power, which can burn through 20 feet of steel in a second. Generating that level of power, still an engineering challenge, will allow the Navy to neutralize anti-ship missiles and fighter jets. Klunder said he believes that while getting up to a megawatt is “certainly part of a longer-term future, there’s a power level significantly less than that that will give us greater effects” against similar challenges.
But the biggest advantage that Eccles and Klunder advertise for the age of the laser weapon is financial. “We’re not talking about something that costs millions of dollars or multi-thousands of dollars,” said Klunder. “We’re talking something — and this is true data; remember, I’m a test pilot, so I deal in data, I don’t deal in PowerPoints, I deal in real performance data — we’re talking about a pulse of directed energy that costs under a U.S. dollar.” Greenert beamed as he noted that the Navy’s shipboard gun and missile arsenal, at its cheapest, costs $5,000 per shot.
A lot about that cost figure depends on successful integration aboard a ship’s deck; successfully drawing from a ship’s power without compromising the propulsion systems; and the cost of fuel per shot. And it also factors out the cost of the weapon itself. But if it turns out to be genuine, the Navy will have developed the rare high-end weapons system that undercuts the cost of adversary weapons.
The big concern in surface warfare is that anti-ship missiles are way cheaper than ships. The Navy can’t make ships cheaper. (Let’s be real.) But it might be able to develop a countermeasure to those anti-ship weapons cheaper than those weapons themselves. “I have the ability now, with a directed energy pulse weapon, to take out something that may cost millions of dollars, or multi-thousands of dollars, with a weapon round that costs about one dollar to shoot,” Klunder said.
As the Navy sees it, that’s the ultimate promise of laser guns: a weapon that undercuts the increasing cheapness and availability of powerful missiles and robots. It’s by no means certain that the Navy can realize the promise. But it’s now fully committed to trying.
“Could, someday, [the LaWS] be missile defense? Perhaps,” Greenert said. “I want to get it out to the environment so it can one day deploy.”
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Old 31-01-2017, 07:27 PM   #107
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Wow and I thought my toys were fun. My Amazing Copters, the inexpensive hand held rubber band controlled LED copter. http://amazingcopter.com/
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