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Old 24-09-2009, 12:44 AM   #41
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http://www.popsci.com.au/military-av...eillance-blimp

Dread Zeppelin: The Army's New Surveillance Blimp

The LEMV, being tested soon, is designed to stay aloft for weeks at a time
By Dan Smith Posted 09.06.2009 at 5:12 am

http://www.popsci.com.au/files/image...icles/LEMV.jpg Long Endurance Multi-INT Vehicle: Floating sentinel

Since the airship glory days of the early part of the century, blimps have certainly lost some of their cachet, relegated to hovering over sporting events and not much else. However, the Army is about to test launch an unmanned hybrid airship to be used for surveillance missions in Afghanistan.

The Long Endurance Multi-INT Vehicle, or LEMV, is an impressive combination of endurance, carrying capacity, and speed (relatively speaking). The aircraft can be launched easily for missions with up to 3-weeks of continuous airtime carrying a 2,500 lb payload at altitudes of 20,000 ft. Larger payloads will lower the aircraft’s ceiling slightly.

Its lift and propulsion systems are equipped to maintain an average speed of 20 kts, but can “dash” at speeds of up to 80 kts when needed. Over the course of its flight the LEMV can cover up to 2,500 miles, over which quite a bit of surveillance information can be collected. It is also equipped with a “rapid deflation device” that will ground the ship quickly if control is somehow lost, keeping it from drifting into restricted airspace and preventing the payload from falling into the wrong hands.

All these stats, however, are for the test device alone. Plans to expand the LEMV’s capabilities after initial testing are underway. The final version might be able to carry payloads of 7,000lbs for month-long trips. If the LEMV becomes a regular surveillance device, silently watching the skies for even longer durations than the current crop of UAVs, we may begin to view the blimp much differently. Oh, the humanity.

[Aviation Week] http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs...f-fefdf0733cb6
http://www.popsci.com.au/military-av...mp-afghanistan

U.S. Army Plans to Send Giant Spy Blimp to Afghanistan


By Anna Maria Jakubek Posted 24.09.2009 at 9:38 am 0 Comments

LEMV: Not Your Father's Blimp: Lockheed Martin

Next time you're in Afghanistan, make sure to keep an eye out for the U.S. Army's Space and Missile Defense Command's giant blimp-like surveillance airship. The Long Endurance Multi-Intelligence Vehicle (LEMV), as it's called, will be 250 feet long, autonomous, and able to float at up to 20,000 feet for an impressive three weeks at a time. As for its surveillance capabilities, a 40-foot-long stretch behind the cockpit will house a selection of spy gear, including a motion sensor and radar.
While the LEMV has yet to be built -- the contract itself won't be awarded until October 1 -- you can get a pretty good idea of the colossal scope of this airship via the below video of Lockheed Martin's P-791, which provided the inspiration for the LEMV. As you watch, keep in mind that the P-791 in the video is only 125 feet long, half the length planned for the LEMV!

[Via AviationWeek.com]



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Old 24-09-2009, 10:56 PM   #42
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http://www.popsci.com.au/military-av...-cyborg-beetle

Video: DARPA's Remote-Controlled Cyborg Beetle Takes Flight

A new paper explains how they built the zombie insect
By Stuart Fox Posted 25.09.2009 at 4:04 am


Remote Controlled Cyborg Beetle via Wired's Danger Room

In January, researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, told a stunned conference audience that they had managed to create a remote-controlled cyborg beetle by attaching a computer chip to the brain of a giant insect. Now, the paper explaining how they did it has been published in the journal Frontiers In Neuroscience, and they have released a video of the cyber-bug in action.
Related Articles

Network of Wi-Fi-Enabled Cyborg Insects Hunts Down WMDs

Are We Being Watched by Flying Robot Insects?

Darpa's First Robotic Ornithopter Hovers, Flies Like a Hummingbird

The cyborg beetle was designed as part of a DARPA project that looks to equip insects with cameras and other sensors in an attempt to turn them into tiny, biological UAVs. The rhinoceros beetle was selected because, as one of the world's largest insects, it could carry the biggest payload. The video below speaks for itself. Zombified with parts available at Radio Shack, the cyborg beetle flies around the room, controlled by a researcher at a laptop.
The day of military-controlled, giant cyborg insects is upon us. Someone call Godzilla, I think we're going to need some help.


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Old 26-09-2009, 03:19 AM   #43
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http://www.popsci.com.au/military-av...ed-warfighters

Self-Regulated Morphine Delivery for Wounded Warfighters

DARPA-funded nanotech drug automatically regulates its morphine dose on the battlefield
By Jeremy Hsu Posted 26.09.2009 at 6:40 am

Safer Pain Relief Wounded soldiers could soon administer their own morphine without watchful medics U.S. Army

Medics still use morphine to relieve the pain of wounded soldiers on the modern battlefield, but have to watch out for morphine reducing breathing and blood pressure to dangerous levels. That may all change with a DARPA-backed combination drug that has successfully limited morphine delivery when it detects low blood oxygen levels.
The drug relies upon nanotech particles that carry both morphine and its antagonist, known as Naloxone. That creates a self-regulating feedback system where Naxolone only activates to suppress morphine when blood oxygen levels drop too low. The antagonist then goes inactive when oxygen blood levels return to normal, and allows more morphine to become available.




Such a drug could prove a boon for medics and individual soldiers to self-administer morphine using an auto-injector. It would provide for safer pain relief anywhere on the battlefield, even without the usual monitoring equipment available in hospitals. Medics currently must administer a short-acting drug to improve respiration and heart beat, but in small enough doses to allow morphine to continue its work.
Researchers at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor had to screen several compounds to find a compound that would activate or inactivate Naloxone as needed. They finally came across one such drug which successfully passed laboratory tests that used human plasma.
Other nanotech has proven promising when it comes to highly controlled and specific drug delivery. But the future debut of this application could prove a particularly sweet day for science, not to mention those far out dreamers at the Pentagon's mad science lab.
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Old 26-09-2009, 03:20 AM   #44
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http://www.popsci.com.au/scitech/art...ps-cylinders-0

Stumbling, Bumbling LittleDog Can Tiptoe Across Tops of Cylinders

Harvard researchers showcase new dynamic motions for the LittleDog robot
By Jeremy Hsu Posted 26.09.2009 at 2:59 am 0 Comments

Who says you can't teach robots new tricks? In this new video, Boston Dynamics' LittleDog delicately navigates a mini-forest of cylinders like a Chinese wuxia martial artist, but also shows plenty of clumsy pratfalls in the course of its training.
LittleDog is the little sibling of the much scarier and noisier BigDog. The latter has gone on to become a robot Sherpa and mule for U.S. Army troops in the mountainous regions of Afghanistan.
The latest footage comes courtesy of Katie Byl, a robotics researcher at Harvard University whose previous exploits include beating casinos with the MIT Blackjack Team. Keep an eye out for the adorable real-life dog that gives the camera a wide-eyed passing stare.




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Old 28-09-2009, 10:34 PM   #45
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http://www.popsci.com.au/military-av...e-takes-flight

Video: Lockheed's Amazing Monocopter Drone Takes Flight

Drones based on maple seed pods might act as portable scouts for soldiers
By Jeremy Hsu Posted 29.09.2009 at 7:57 am

Drones have become big business for today's military, whether they come in the form of Hellfire-spitting Reapers and Predators or large airships that can hover over battlefields. Then, there's this small monocopter that flies like a maple seed pod.
The SAMARAI system from Lockheed Martin takes its name from the samara seedlings that fly off of trees. Original plans called for a seed pod-sized drone that could somehow send back stable streaming video and deliver a 2-gram payload. Funding for the system supposedly dropped out after a phase 1 DARPA contract, but now here's this recent video of a larger test prototype with a 30-inch wing span.



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Old 02-10-2009, 04:35 AM   #46
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http://www.popsci.com.au/military-av...akes-out-truck

Pew! Airborne Military Laser Takes Out Truck

By Stuart Fox Posted 02.10.2009 at 10:30 am 0 Comments

In a recent test at the White Sands Missile Range, a specially equipped C-130 plane fried a parked truck with a powerful laser. And PopSci's got the video.

As you can see, the laser beam burns right through the truck's hood, and then through the engine, "defeating" the vehicle. Called the "Advanced Tactical Laser" (ATL), this is the first time the megawatt-powered chemical laser has been used to engage a target in a combat simulation situation.
Now, to be far, the car was parked by itself in the middle of the desert. So unless we've got a clean shot at Al-Qaeda's parking lot, the beam isn't ready for prime time. Plus, last year the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board said that "the Advanced Tactical Laser testbed has no operational utility."
Despite those reservations, Boeing is still confident that the laser will soon provide a weapon that can take out a target with little or no collateral damage.

http://link.brightcove.com/services/...id=43003194001
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Old 02-10-2009, 04:39 AM   #47
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http://www.popsci.com.au/military-av...d-combat-zones


Air Force Calls for Unmanned Cargo Aircraft To Supply Hazardous Combat Zones

Drone aircraft could become the air mules of tomorrow for the military
By Jeremy Hsu Posted 01.10.2009 at 11:49 pm 0 Comments

Drone Delivery Imagine this cargo plane without pilots, and you get an idea of what the U.S. Air Force wants U.S. Air Force

Drones already rule much of the skies over modern day battlefields, and could someday begin ferrying cargo to forward bases and troops. The U.S. Air Force put out a call this week for a fully autonomous unmanned air vehicle that can deliver cargo within a combat radius of 500 nautical miles.
Such a drone must have vertical or short takeoff and landing capability of 300 feet, and also have the ability to fly at airspeeds of 290 mph or more. The Air Force wish list for optional features includes: air-launched glide capability, powered capability, ship-based/recoverable capability, and the ability to land on all sorts of rough surfaces or water. A "reusable" and "inexpensive" air vehicle would be nice, too.

Related Articles

Dread Zeppelin: The Army's New Surveillance BlimpAir Force Shoots Down Runaway Drone Over AfghanistanPoint. Click. Kill: Inside The Air Force's Frantic Unmanned ReinventionTags

Military, Aviation & Space, Jeremy Hsu, air force, aircraft, CARGO, drones, robotics, robots, uas, uav, unmanned
The official query marks yet another step toward the robot-filled battlefield of tomorrow, or at least a battlefield well-supplied by robots. That should help humans avoid hazardous combat supply missions under enemy fire, although someone might want to be on hand in case any drones get confused about their mission orders.
Aviation Weekly calls a drone cargo carrier the next "killer app" for unmanned aircraft. The military probably agrees: the U.S. Marine Corps has already picked helicopter prototypes from Boeing and Lockheed Martin/Kaman for unmanned cargo demonstrations and early deployment to Afghanistan.
Get ready to see more hard concepts emerge when the Air Mobility Command hosts its "Unmanned Cargo Aircraft Day" on November 17 at Scott Air Force Base in Illinois. Between that and the recent Robotics Rodeo hosted by the U.S. Army, robot makers seem set for a very happy holiday season.
[via Aviation Weekly]
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Old 02-10-2009, 10:32 PM   #48
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http://www.popsci.com.au/military-av...itary-training

With Drone Shortage, Air Force Pilots Train With Cessnas Dressed Up Like Predators

Converted manned aircraft with mounted sensor balls will imitate Predators and Reapers during military exercises
By Jeremy Hsu Posted 03.10.2009 at 3:09 am

Surrogate Predator: A Cessna 182 wears the sensor ball of a Predator Lon Carlson, L-3 Communications


A high demand for Predators and Reapers on the front lines has led the U.S. Air Force to take an unusual step: asking human pilots to mimic the drones for training purposes back in the States. Cessna 182 aircraft have become converted "Surrogate Predators" with the installation of a "Predator ball" that typically serves as the surveillance and tracking eyes for drone operators. Such Predator balls give the manned Cessnas the ability to lock onto targets and track them.
"We're using a manned aircraft to simulate an unmanned aircraft," said CAP-U.S. Air Force Commander Col. Bill Ward. A group of 18 pilots from the Civil Air Patrol have volunteered for initial training to learn the same tactics and procedures of Predator operators on combat missions. All CAP pilots have prior military experience.
Related Articles

Air Force Shoots Down Runaway Drone Over Afghanistan
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Video: An Annotated Predator Drone Strike in Afghanistan The retrained Cessna cadre will then take part in Green Flag military exercises, in which they play out hunter-killer scenarios by identifying targets and providing video to an Army or Marine brigade. The only difference between the Cessnas and the real thing is that pilots won't shoot Hellfire missiles themselves. PopSci has previously examined how the Air Force wants to reinvent itself by training thousands of drone pilots overnight. Reaper and Predator drones have already launched countless strikes on enemy targets from up high, as seen in this exclusive PopSci gun camera footage narrated by a Predator instructor pilot.
Still, the manned Surrogate Predators hold at least one advantage over the real thing -- they probably won't escape the control of human handlers so easily based on an internal malfunction or communications glitch.
[via Aviation Weekly]
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Old 08-10-2009, 11:00 PM   #49
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http://www.popsci.com.au/military-av...acks-down-wmds

Network of Wi-Fi-Enabled Cyborg Insects Hunts Down WMDs

Latest military news: A wireless network allows electronically enhanced bugs to chirp, tweet, and blog (some day!) about weapons they find
By Dan Smith Posted 18.06.2009 at 4:27 am

http://www.popsci.com.au/files/image...es/wififly.jpg Wi-Fi Fly via MI2G http://www.mi2g.com/cgi/mi2g/press/061007.php

In its attempts to quash weapons of mass destruction, the Pentagon has been trying novel ways to track down dangerous materiel. For years, DARPA has been trying to train insects and bugs to sniff out toxic substances, providing more sensitive detection, as well as access that conventional sensors might not have. The newest twist on this concept is a plan to link up armies of the cyborg bugs in a peer-to-peer, or insect-to-insect, network that will allow them to communicate with each other and with their human masters.

Previous research into this field of detection included landmine-sniffing honeybees and mechanized remote-controlled insects. This next approach will implant insects with a chip that reads certain muscle twitches, which correspond to the presence of certain chemicals. The chips will then modify the chirps of insects like cicadas or crickets into an electronic signal that could be transmitted to other chipped insects in the area. Information about detected weaponized chemicals could bounce around this mobile insect network, and then be picked up by humans.

While the idea seems pretty far-fetched, the idea of creating a decentralized communication network between free-roaming insects could radically increase the bugs' range of detection. Still unclear, however, is if this insect Wi-Fi will allow the information-laden chirps to be more than 140 characters long.

[via Wired] http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2009...d-offer-wi-fi/
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Originally Posted by john connor View Post
Here you go DJ..just came accross this one too...check out the highlighted part...if they can micro chip 'bug's..imagine how small the bloody chips are now...

Military Developing Half-Robot, Half-Insect 'Cybug' Spies

Miniature robots could be good spies, but researchers now are experimenting with insect cyborgs or "cybugs" that could work even better.

Scientists can already control the flight of real moths using implanted devices.

The military and spy world no doubt would love tiny, live camera-wielding versions of Predator drones that could fly undetected into places where no human could ever go to snoop on the enemy.

Developing such robots has proven a challenge so far, with one major hurdle being inventing an energy source for the droids that is both low weight and high power.

of attempting to create sophisticated robots that imitate the complexity in the insect form that required millions of years of evolution to achieve, scientists now essentially want to hijack bugs for use as robots.

Originally researchers sought to control insects by gluing machinery onto their backs, but such links were not always reliable.

To overcome this hurdle, the Hybrid Insect Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (HI-MEMS) program sophisticated robots is sponsoring research into surgically implanting microchips straight into insects as they grow, intertwining their nerves and muscles with circuitry that can then steer the critters.

Anyone think its still si Fi and we are not next??...and when were no longer any use...DELETE

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,...est=latestnews
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http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,532511,00.html

Military Developing Half-Robot, Half-Insect 'Cybug' Spies

Thursday, July 16, 2009
By Charles Q. Choi

http://www.foxnews.com/images/545525...bugspy_320.jpgDARPA

Researchers are now experimenting with developing insect cyborgs or 'cybugs' that could work as spies.

Miniature robots could be good spies, but researchers now are experimenting with insect cyborgs or "cybugs" that could work even better.

Scientists can already control the flight of real moths using implanted devices. http://www.livescience.com/strangene...rg-insect.html

The military and spy world no doubt would love tiny, live camera-wielding versions of Predator drones that could fly undetected into places where no human could ever go to snoop on the enemy.

Developing such robots has proven a challenge so far, with one major hurdle being inventing an energy source for the droids that is both low weight and high power.

Still, evidence that such machines are possible is ample in nature in the form of insects, which convert biological energy into flight.

• Click here for FOXNews.com's Patents and Innovation Center.
http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/innovation/

It makes sense to pattern robots after insects — after all, they must be doing something right, seeing as they are the most successful animals on the planet, comprising roughly 75 percent of all animal species known to humanity. http://www.livescience.com/strangene..._sniffers.html

Indeed, scientists have patterned robots after insects and other animals for decades — to mimic cockroach wall-crawling, for instance, or the grasshopper's leap. http://www.livescience.com/technolog...ing-robot.html

Mechanical metamorphosis

Instead of attempting to create sophisticated robots that imitate the complexity in the insect form that required millions of years of evolution to achieve, scientists now essentially want to hijack bugs for use as robots.

Originally researchers sought to control insects by gluing machinery onto their backs, but such links were not always reliable.

To overcome this hurdle, the Hybrid Insect Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (HI-MEMS) program sophisticated robots is sponsoring research into surgically implanting microchips straight into insects as they grow, intertwining their nerves and muscles with circuitry that can then steer the critters. http://www.livescience.com/topic/robots
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As expensive as these devices might be to manufacture and embed in the bugs, they could still prove cheaper than building miniature robots from scratch.

As these cyborgs heal from their surgery while they naturally metamorphose from one developmental stage to the next — for instance, from caterpillar to butterfly — the result would yield a more reliable connection between the devices and the insects, the thinking goes.

The fact that insects are immobile during some of these stages — for instance, when they are metamorphosing in cocoons — means they can be manipulated far more easily than if they were actively wriggling, meaning that devices could be implanted with assembly-line routine, significantly lowering costs.

The HI-MEMS program at the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has to date invested $12 million into research since it began in 2006. It currently supports these cybug projects:

— Roaches at Texas A&M.

— Horned beetles at University of Michigan and the University of California at Berkeley.

— Moths at an MIT-led team, and another moth project at the Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research.

Success with moths

So far researchers have successfully embedded MEMS into developing insects, and living adult insects have emerged with the embedded systems intact, a DARPA spokesperson told LiveScience.

Researchers have also demonstrated that such devices can indeed control the flight of moths, albeit when they are tethered.

To power the devices, instead of relying on batteries, the hope is to convert the heat and mechanical energy the insect generates as it moves into electricity. The insects themselves could be optimized to generate electricity.

When the researchers can properly control the insects using the embedded devices, the cybugs might then enter the field, equipped with cameras, microphones and other sensors to help them spy on targets or sniff out explosives.

Although insects do not always live very long in the wild, the cyborgs' lives could be prolonged by attaching devices that feed them.

The scientists are now working toward controlled, untethered flight, with the final goal being delivering the insect within 15 feet (5 m) of a specific target located 300 feet (100 meters) away, using electronic remote control by radio or GPS or both, standing still on arrival.

Although flying insects such as moths and dragonflies are of great interest, hopping and swimming insects could also be useful, too, DARPA noted.

It's conceivable that eventually a swarm of cybugs could converge on targets by land, sea and air. http://www.livescience.com/technolog...r-command.html
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http://www.popsci.com.au/scitech/art...d-drone-swarms

New from Boeing: Flying Bot Swarms You Control With Body Language

Human operators could use gestures to direct clouds of robot drones
By Jeremy Hsu Posted 19.09.2009 at 2:49 am 0 Comments

Motion-Controlled Swarm Minions: Cue "Ride of the Valkyries" -- the drone swarm has arrived Boeing

Robot swarms could someday hover, spin, and attack in response to a simple gesture or graceful pirouette from a human operator. And yes, Boeing has filed a patent on that future vision.
"The method may involve defining a plurality of body movements of an operator that correspond to a plurality of operating commands for the unmanned object," Boeing notes in its patent filing. "Body movements of the operator may be sensed to generate the operating commands."


Boeing goes further by laying claim to specific body motions for specific commands. A nod of the human operator's head could select one robot out of the flying unmanned swarm. A circular hand motion along a certain plane could order another robot to begin moving from a stationary position. An operator might even select a certain group of drones with a pointing motion that defines a "three-dimensional conical area." The patent filed early this month also includes reflective markers, a motion capture system, and a wireless transmission system for human-to-drone commands. That points to a future where warfighters and civilians can interact more naturally with their friendly neighborhood swarm.
We at PopSci can readily imagine some entertainment spin-offs from such technology as well, given the popularity of motion-control technology with the current generation of video game consoles. Microsoft's upcoming Project Natal promises a full-body motion controller experience for Xbox 360 games, and Sony has gone a step farther by filing a patent on emotion-controlled gaming.
Could even a Gamer-style future with battle bots remain far behind such developments? We sure hope not, because ascribing any sort of predictive power to that movie seems too terrible (and aesthetically wrong) to contemplate.
[via Baltimore Sun]
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http://www.popsci.com.au/military-av...-cyborg-beetle

Video: DARPA's Remote-Controlled Cyborg Beetle Takes Flight

A new paper explains how they built the zombie insect
By Stuart Fox Posted 25.09.2009 at 4:04 am


Remote Controlled Cyborg Beetle via Wired's Danger Room

In January, researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, told a stunned conference audience that they had managed to create a remote-controlled cyborg beetle by attaching a computer chip to the brain of a giant insect. Now, the paper explaining how they did it has been published in the journal Frontiers In Neuroscience, and they have released a video of the cyber-bug in action.
Related Articles

Network of Wi-Fi-Enabled Cyborg Insects Hunts Down WMDs

Are We Being Watched by Flying Robot Insects?

Darpa's First Robotic Ornithopter Hovers, Flies Like a Hummingbird

The cyborg beetle was designed as part of a DARPA project that looks to equip insects with cameras and other sensors in an attempt to turn them into tiny, biological UAVs. The rhinoceros beetle was selected because, as one of the world's largest insects, it could carry the biggest payload. The video below speaks for itself. Zombified with parts available at Radio Shack, the cyborg beetle flies around the room, controlled by a researcher at a laptop.
The day of military-controlled, giant cyborg insects is upon us. Someone call Godzilla, I think we're going to need some help.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PAeV96bTRiI
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http://singularityhub.com/2009/10/07...yborg-beetles/

Free Flying Cyborg Beetles

October 7th, 2009 by Aaron Saenz






This is how you make a big bad beetle-borg.

In the future, when a spy worries about a room being bugged, she might have to look for actual bugs. Back in March we told you about Michel Maharbiz attaching electrodes to beetles’ brains to get them to beat their wings. Well, Maharbiz and his colleagues at the University of California Berkeley have taken the next step and taken their cyborg beetles out for a wireless flight. The experiment is funded by DARPA in the hopes of eventually creating a fully remote controlled spy insect that could listen in to conversations or possibly find missing people after a disaster. Check out the brief video from New Scientist below.
In the recent experiment shown in the video, the species Mecynorrhina torquata was big enough to handle the necessary electronic devices to allow it to fly wirelessly. Looking at it, you almost can’t tell the beetle is under someone else’s control. Researchers are hopeful that whether or not the insects could be cybernetically enhanced to become spies or rescuers, they will still reveal interesting knowledge about the way the neural systems of insects function.

http://brightcove.newscientist.com/s...id=42939806001
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The project is remarkable because the signals that the beetles are receiving aren’t very precise. Unlike another wireless neural system like Braingate, the Berkeley team isn’t targeting individual motor neurons. Large sections of the insect brain are being stimulated to get the beetle to take off, and again to begin landing, but continuous pulses don’t control the bug. Researchers steer the beetle left or right by stimulating muscle tissue. After the command for a turn is given, the beetle is allowed to right and balance itself. In other words, the remote controlled insect is actually much more like a horse with reigns. Creating cybernetic insect spies and rescuers involves implanting electrodes into beetles while they are still pupae. As the beetle matures, their capacity to carry electronics on their head increases, but it’s quite a battle to get devices small enough to be carried by the bugs. Batteries are heavy, and the beetles still haven’t been saddled with GPS trackers, cameras, microphones, or any of the various gizmos a spy might require. Considering the rapid pace that Maharbiz is keeping, he may have the beetles ready to fly missions before the electronics are small enough to ride shotgun. In fact, reliably powering electronics on that scale may require enough effort that creating robotic bugs will be a better choice than making cyborg ones.
Still, it’s pretty cool that electric pulses applied to vague areas of beetle brains can essentially turn them into insect-sized beasts of burden. The next course of action should be to see if the Berkeley team can get their wireless flying bugs to navigate an obstacle course reliably. Whether or not we then see the beetles adapted to espionage, disaster relief, or a weird miniature version of NASCAR remains to be seen.
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Old 10-10-2009, 12:21 AM   #50
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http://www.popsci.com.au/military-av...eillance-blimp

Dread Zeppelin: The Army's New Surveillance Blimp

The LEMV, being tested soon, is designed to stay aloft for weeks at a time
By Dan Smith Posted 09.06.2009 at 5:12 am

http://www.popsci.com.au/files/image...icles/LEMV.jpg Long Endurance Multi-INT Vehicle: Floating sentinel

Since the airship glory days of the early part of the century, blimps have certainly lost some of their cachet, relegated to hovering over sporting events and not much else. However, the Army is about to test launch an unmanned hybrid airship to be used for surveillance missions in Afghanistan.

The Long Endurance Multi-INT Vehicle, or LEMV, is an impressive combination of endurance, carrying capacity, and speed (relatively speaking). The aircraft can be launched easily for missions with up to 3-weeks of continuous airtime carrying a 2,500 lb payload at altitudes of 20,000 ft. Larger payloads will lower the aircraft’s ceiling slightly.

Its lift and propulsion systems are equipped to maintain an average speed of 20 kts, but can “dash” at speeds of up to 80 kts when needed. Over the course of its flight the LEMV can cover up to 2,500 miles, over which quite a bit of surveillance information can be collected. It is also equipped with a “rapid deflation device” that will ground the ship quickly if control is somehow lost, keeping it from drifting into restricted airspace and preventing the payload from falling into the wrong hands.

All these stats, however, are for the test device alone. Plans to expand the LEMV’s capabilities after initial testing are underway. The final version might be able to carry payloads of 7,000lbs for month-long trips. If the LEMV becomes a regular surveillance device, silently watching the skies for even longer durations than the current crop of UAVs, we may begin to view the blimp much differently. Oh, the humanity.

[Aviation Week] http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs...f-fefdf0733cb6
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Originally Posted by nosferatu_dj View Post
http://www.popsci.com.au/military-av...mp-afghanistan

U.S. Army Plans to Send Giant Spy Blimp to Afghanistan


By Anna Maria Jakubek Posted 24.09.2009 at 9:38 am 0 Comments

LEMV: Not Your Father's Blimp: Lockheed Martin

Next time you're in Afghanistan, make sure to keep an eye out for the U.S. Army's Space and Missile Defense Command's giant blimp-like surveillance airship. The Long Endurance Multi-Intelligence Vehicle (LEMV), as it's called, will be 250 feet long, autonomous, and able to float at up to 20,000 feet for an impressive three weeks at a time. As for its surveillance capabilities, a 40-foot-long stretch behind the cockpit will house a selection of spy gear, including a motion sensor and radar.
While the LEMV has yet to be built -- the contract itself won't be awarded until October 1 -- you can get a pretty good idea of the colossal scope of this airship via the below video of Lockheed Martin's P-791, which provided the inspiration for the LEMV. As you watch, keep in mind that the P-791 in the video is only 125 feet long, half the length planned for the LEMV!

[Via AviationWeek.com]


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hVNV-FFUOnc
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http://xenophilius.wordpress.com/200...n-the-balloon/

Moon the Balloon?

Posted by Xeno on October 9, 2009
There’s a giant blimp, white with three tail fins, hanging over the city these days and it’s causing a stir among Kandaharis who believe the Americans are using it to spy on them.And it could be they’re right.
“Many people believe it’s a spy blimp that can see through walls to look at our women,” said Ghulam Ghami, a local fixer attuned to the buzz in coffee shops and kebab stands.
While that notion is outlandish, the U.S. is developing a $400-million blimp-like surveillance airship. It is expected to be deployed in Afghanistan by 2011.
Lockheed Martin’s long endurance multi-intelligence vehicle (LEMV), as it’s named, will be 250-feet (76-metre) long, and able to float at up to 20,000 feet for three weeks at a time. As for its surveillance capabilities, a 40-foot-long (12 m.) stretch behind the cockpit will house a selection of spy gear, including a motion sensor and radar.
While the LEMV has yet to be built — the contract will be awarded this month — Lockheed Martin has already produced a prototype: the P-791.
The P-791, which flew six times in 2006, is half the planned length of the LEMV. In test flights, the P-791 showed itself capable of carrying heavy loads and executing sharp turns
Could the blimp over Kandahar actually be an ? It’s plainly visible to the naked eye, and looks spectacular lit up at night. That seems counter to the notion of spying as a furtive, clandestine pursuit.
Calls to the U.S. Defence Department were not returned.
Might the blimp be a weather balloon of sorts, used to gather scientific data for research purposes? Possibly, but most weather develops over water, and Afghanistan is land locked.
Whatever it is, the blimp is making locals uneasy.
“People don’t like it,” said Ghami. “Some are saying they are going to shoot at it.”
The LEMV is sure to be an imposing sight when it is test deployed in Afghanistan in 2011.
As a hybrid airship, the LEMV is heavier than air but will get some of its buoyancy from gas compartments. It will feature turbines on its underside to help launch it into the air and will require a short runway.
In the early 20th century, airships were used in warfare, with dirigibles being employed for bombing and for intelligence gathering. However, the advent of airplanes and horrific disasters such as the Hindenburg fire put an end to the airship as a war weapon.
Now airships are poised to make a return to the battle front. The LEMV will be used primarily for intelligence gathering on such area as the Afghanistan-Pakistan border.
Annoyed Kandaharis could consider borrowing a tactic from the people of Sarnia, Ont. About 70 people there dropped their pants to “moon the balloon.”
It was a protest against a spy balloon that a U.S. company began using over the summer to monitor the border, including their town. …
- via Edmonton
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Old 10-10-2009, 12:30 AM   #51
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EATR Military Robots to Use Biomatter as Fuel
http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showthread.php?t=72072
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Old 13-10-2009, 09:04 PM   #52
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http://www.popsci.com.au/technology/...uld-save-lives

US General Demands Robot Army, Counts 122 Lives That Bots Could Have Saved

By Stuart Fox Posted 14.10.2009

Robo-grunt There was something unnerving about how it kept asking about John Connor... via California Science and Technology News

Like most Army commanders, Lt. General Rick Lynch says that he needed more troops in Iraq, and that they would have saved the lives of men lost under his command. Unlike most commanders though, Lynch isn't demanding flesh and blood soldiers, but steel and rubber robotic infantrymen.
Speaking at the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International conference, Lynch said that robot systems already in place could have saved 122 of the 155 men who died during his time in Iraq.
Lynch's concerns hold particular weight, as he has both the combat experience of leading the Army's Third Infantry Division in Iraq, and the academic experience of earning a Master's Degree in robotics from MIT.
Echoing similar statements he made in August, Lynch claims that deploying remotely, or autonomously, navigated ground vehicles could have lowered casualties as a result of IEDs, and that robotic infantry could have replaced humans on dangerous surveillance missions.
Some robot infantry had been deployed to Iraq, specifically the SWORD gun platform, but the Army severely restricted their use over safety concerns.
Lynch went even farther than most in his talk, demanding the implementation of autonomous, armed robot systems. He countered other Army critics, saying that he believed the current level of technology was advanced enough to overcome problems with autonomous robots shooting the wrong people.
"There's a resistance saying that armed ground robots are not ready for the battlefield. I'm not of that camp," Lynch said.
[via Wired's Danger Room]
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Old 13-10-2009, 11:14 PM   #53
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http://www.popsci.com.au/technology/...durance-record

Hydrogen-Powered Navy UAV Shatters Flight Endurance Record

By Stuart Fox Posted 14.10.2009

Ion Tiger courtesy of the Naval Research Laboratory

While most research directed at improving UAVs focuses on upgrading their weapons or sensor packages, the Naval Research Laboratory is also working to ensure that the next generation of killer drones are as fuel-efficient as they are deadly. And a recent test of their hydrogen-fuel-cell-powered Ion Tiger UAV proves how successful they have been: it staid aloft for just shy of 24 hours on a single fuel load.
Flying out of the Aberdeen Proving Ground, the Ion Tiger UAV set a new record for hydrogen-powered flight by staying aloft for 23 hours and 17 minutes. This places close to the 30-36 hour endurance of the Tiger's gas guzzling Predator and Reaper cousins.
Unlike its larger relatives, Ion Tiger only weighs 37 pounds, thus requiring only .75 horsepower to fly around for the better part of a day. However, the hydrogen powered motor did prove four times more efficient than similarly powerful combustion engines and seven times more powerful than a comparably sized battery.
So far, the Ion Tiger exists only as a proof of concept, and has not been deployed on land or at sea.
[via Science Daily]
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Old 14-10-2009, 10:03 PM   #54
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http://www.spectrum.ieee.org/blog/ro...g-blob-chembot

Video: iRobot's Shape-Shifting Blob 'Bot Takes Its First Steps


POSTED BY: Anne-Marie Corley // Tue, October 13, 2009

This is by far one of the coolest and weirdest robot prototypes we at IEEE Spectrum have ever seen.
Meet iRobot's soft, shape-shifting robot blob. It rolls around and changes shape, and it will be able to squeeze through tiny cracks in a wall when the project is finished.
(Skip the first 1:50 minutes of the video above to see the blob in action.)
Researchers from iRobot and the University of Chicago discussed their palm-sized soft robot, known as a chemical robot, or chembot, at the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems yesterday. It's "the first demonstration of a completely soft, mobile robot using jamming as an enabling technology," they write in a paper presented at the conference.
The concept of "jamming skin enabled locomotion" is explained quite nicely in the video. The polymer used for the bot’s stretchy skin is off-the-shelf silicon two-part rubber.
By controlling the parts of the blob that "inflate," the researchers can make it roll.



The video shows the project as it was about a year ago. The current stage has a bit different design and is moving toward the ability to include sensors or even connect different blobs together, but those details are sketchy.
When asked about the usefulness of such a bot, iRobot researcher Annan Mozeika promptly answered, "to squeeze into small holes." And who wants to do that? DARPA, of course. End of questions.
Video: iRobot


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Old 15-10-2009, 08:03 PM   #55
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http://www.popsci.com.au/technology/...t-plasma-knife

US Special Forces Field-Testing Plasma Knife

By Stuart Fox Posted 16.10.2009

May the Schwartz Be With You via DVD.net.au

Emergency medical care for soldiers wounded on the battlefield has come a long way since Hawkeye and Hot Lips. But for Special Forces troopers operating deep behind enemy lines, that care often remains out of reach. Blood loss in particular makes seconds count, and imperils commandos operating far away from friendly bases.
To help with the problem of blood loss from traumatic wounds, the military has started field-testing a device more Mandalorian than M.A.S.H.: a plasma knife.


The knife, whose blade consists of heated, ionized gas, cuts through flesh just as easily a steel scalpel, but also cauterizes the wound. By sealing off the damaged flesh, the plasma knife protects against infection, and stops the bleeding that imperils the wounded soldier. Think the crispy stump of Luke's severed hand, and you'll get the picture. For now, the plasma blade remains a life-saving device, not a weapon. But I think it goes without saying that we all look forward to the day when the military converts this technology into a more elegant weapon, for a more civilized time.
[via Wired's Danger Room]
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Old 15-10-2009, 08:09 PM   #56
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http://www.popsci.com.au/technology/...tealth-fighter

China Designs Indigenous UAV Stealth Fighter, and Bootlegs Some US Models

By Stuart Fox Posted 16.10.2009

China's Dark Sword UAV Stealth Fighter via Defense Professionals

When I hear the phrase "knock-off Chinese products", I usually think of either the bootleg DVDs I get on the subway or the cheap electronics I get in Midtown. But a new report in Defense Professionals notes that the Chinese military has channeled that same skill for replication towards closing their UAV technology gap. By simply copying US technology, China has created a stock of advanced drones, and gained the technical knowledge to create some interesting native UAVs as well.
The story lists most of China's major UAV programs, most of which simply knock off successful American UAVs like oh so many cheap copies of Crank 2 or Louis Vuitton handbags. They claim that the Yi-long reconnaissance drone is nothing more than a xerox of our Predator, with the Xiang-long and WuZhen-2000 drones copying the Global Hawk.
However, the article also notes that despite the pervasive replication of US technology, the Chinese military has also developed some interesting indigenous drone technology. In particular, the Dark Sword drone seems unlike anything the American military fields today. The Chinese describe it as the "future of Chinese unmanned combat aviation," and emphasize the high maneuverability, stealth features, and air-to-air combat specialization.
Considering how badass that Dark Sword UAV sounds, maybe the US should think about copying it. Turnabout is fair play, after all.
[via Wired's Danger Room]
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Old 15-10-2009, 09:46 PM   #57
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cool...where do i get myself one of those?
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Old 15-10-2009, 09:50 PM   #58
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Originally Posted by nosferatu_dj View Post
EATR Military Robots to Use Biomatter as Fuel
http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showthread.php?t=72072
hi nosferatu .that was a short thread but it just about says it all.....one day they will fed on us......OMG
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Old 15-10-2009, 10:12 PM   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nosferatu_dj View Post
http://www.popsci.com.au/technology/...tealth-fighter

China Designs Indigenous UAV Stealth Fighter, and Bootlegs Some US Models

By Stuart Fox Posted 16.10.2009

China's Dark Sword UAV Stealth Fighter via Defense Professionals

When I hear the phrase "knock-off Chinese products", I usually think of either the bootleg DVDs I get on the subway or the cheap electronics I get in Midtown. But a new report in Defense Professionals notes that the Chinese military has channeled that same skill for replication towards closing their UAV technology gap. By simply copying US technology, China has created a stock of advanced drones, and gained the technical knowledge to create some interesting native UAVs as well.
The story lists most of China's major UAV programs, most of which simply knock off successful American UAVs like oh so many cheap copies of Crank 2 or Louis Vuitton handbags. They claim that the Yi-long reconnaissance drone is nothing more than a xerox of our Predator, with the Xiang-long and WuZhen-2000 drones copying the Global Hawk.
However, the article also notes that despite the pervasive replication of US technology, the Chinese military has also developed some interesting indigenous drone technology. In particular, the Dark Sword drone seems unlike anything the American military fields today. The Chinese describe it as the "future of Chinese unmanned combat aviation," and emphasize the high maneuverability, stealth features, and air-to-air combat specialization.
Considering how badass that Dark Sword UAV sounds, maybe the US should think about copying it. Turnabout is fair play, after all.
[via Wired's Danger Room]
Check this out later thanks
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Old 21-10-2009, 11:13 PM   #60
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http://www.popsci.com.au/technology/...nes-buddy-list

Google's Android Allows Soldiers to Put Drones on Buddy List

Defense giant Raytheon has turned Google's mobile operating system into a military application
By Jeremy Hsu Posted 22.10.2009


Phones for Warfighters U.S. Army/Tech. Sgt. Cohen A. Young

Google's Android operating system for cell phones could allow soldiers to track fellow squad members and even unmanned drones in real time on a map -- as long as the humans and robots are on their buddy list.
That's just one use of an Android-based application developed by defense giant Raytheon. The Raytheon Android Tactical System (RATS) costs just a few hundred dollars per user, as opposed to thousands for other systems, and allows anyone familiar with a smart phone to immediately start using it.


For instance, warfighters can watch their little drone buddy's flight patterns on a map, or even get streaming video from the overhead aerial view. RATS also enables soldiers to send snapshots of suspects to the Department of Defense's private data network for immediate identification, and could even include biometric scanners to capture fingerprints in the near future. Raytheon plans to deploy RATS within the next month or so, after two years of development, according to Forbes. We're looking forward to the future editions where users can control their robot swarms using basic body language.
[via Forbes]
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