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Old 15-09-2012, 08:32 PM   #41
jane_d
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Originally Posted by maccoy View Post
Russia is a great country, Putin is a great leader.


How nice.

P.S. There was a protest today in Moscow again... Against Putin, Soros doesn't rest. But I should to say, now it is a very small part of Moscow (and it was so in the beginning, but now even much more smaller) and in other cities there are no protests. Now it's more like a comedy, when they talk about the "march of millions" and "Maidan" (they mean "orange" revolution in Ukraine), and then 10 - 15 thousands come. I only hope they will not send again agents provocateurs as it was in May, who threw pieces of asphalt and tears gas on police for provoking them (you see, we have all opposite now).

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Old 16-09-2012, 08:41 PM   #42
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http://www.nypost.com/p/news/opinion...sPyPnmxkpPWsnJ (2010)

An article is written from the point of interests US government...

Putin wins again

"Jeez, this guy is good.

A few years back, I wrote that Russia's Prime Minister Vladimir Putin was the most impressive major leader on today's world stage. Since then, he's gotten better.

Back then, he was eating President George W. Bush for breakfast. Now he's snacking on President Obama as sushi -- eating him raw, in happy little bites.

Putin's ruthless, unforgiving and murderous. (Not true, but it is logical to hear from them, yeah ) He also has a clear vision of what he wants, the strength of will to get it -- and a stunning ability to spot the weaknesses in his foreign counterparts.

Putin's the Evil Empire's belated answer to President Ronald Reagan. Where the Gipper focused uncompromisingly on bringing down the Soviet imperium, Putin focuses uncompromisingly on restoring imperial Russia.

And he's making progress, as US leaders and their advisers bumble and stumble along with neither a clear strategic vision nor a rational sense of foreign-policy priorities.

Putin doesn't seem like a man much given to hilarity, but he must be laughing his butt off at our incompetence. Consider his strategic achievements in just the last few months:

- He cunningly let Obama bamboozle himself into a gotta-have-it-now Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty that damages US conventional capabilities while Russia gives up only old junk it needed to dump anyway.

- He cut another arms deal with Hugo Chavez, selling the unstable Venezuelan 5 billion more bucks' worth of weapons -- on top of 4 billion already contracted. It's an unprecedented armament program for South America, supporting Chavez's bellicose "Bolivarian" goal of "re-uniting" Venezuela and Colombia.

- Putin finally got his pawn into power in Ukraine, erasing the westward orientation of yesteryear's Orange Revolution. Bringing Ukraine back inside Russia's borders remains Putin's top priority. He just took a giant step toward achieving it.

- Putin also drew Kazakhstan -- the keystone Central Asian state and a major energy supplier -- closer to Moscow.

- Last week, Putin supported the overthrow of the US-backed government of Kyrgyzstan, tightening his chokehold on our northern supply route into Afghanistan. The Obama administration was utterly blindsided ("Where's Kyrgyzstan?").

- The crash of an aircraft carrying Poland's fiercely anti-Russian president and his key advisers may have been just amazingly good luck on Putin's part, but it's the kind of luck to which we should pay attention. Russia's neighbors certainly have. (Kaczynski, who supported Saakashvili and said that event in Georgia was a very strong argument for location of the US system defence in Poland, was not our friend. Polish leadership has been forcing us for 20 years to accept crime which Soviet Union did not commit. Of course, talking about "luck" here is very cynically, I'm very sorry for those who died and their relatives... And this story is still unclear, but maybe someone crashed plane for blaming Putin. Or it was a real scary and rock coincidence. For Putin - it was not in his interests - to ruin relations with Poland; we have difficult relations with them without it)

- Domestically, Putin continued extending his control over the economy and the media. (What, no protests from Western journalistic colleagues?) An artful sniper, not a clumsy bomber, he kills or imprisons when "necessary," but doesn't purge the Russian masses. (The only problem he hasn't been able to hammer down has been domestic Islamist terrorism -- where he meets his match in strength of will.)

Well, it is not very right. After killing of Politkovskaya he said that "harm from her death was bigger than from her activities". And about Litvinenko and someone else.. Making an allusion that they were killed by those who promoted them, but when promoting their deaths started to be more profitable, the same person killed them. I think it is much more cynically than Putin's phrase if it seems so. I think it was Berezovsky's order. About our media I wrote earlier. All is not so perfect.

- On Iran, Putin's a savvy old tomcat toying with the Obama mouse. While Moscow's overt, covert and clandestine trade with Tehran continues, Putin does his good-cop/bad-cop routine with President Dmitry Medvedev, keeping hope alive in the White House that, this time, Russia will finally back meaningful sanctions. Sarah Palin will sign on with Code Pink first.


Meanwhile, our president continues to play into Putin's hands. At this week's Nuclear Vanity Summit (which accomplished nothing), Obama snubbed Georgia's president, Mikhail Saakashvili. Putin will read that as license to renew his aggression against the struggling democracy in Tbilisi (first Kyrgyzstan, then Georgia?). Obama had time for Putin's Ukrainian puppet, President Viktor Yanukovych, though.

And all the while the administration's fighting Russia's drug war in Afghanistan while snoozing through the narco-bloodbath on our own southern border.

A major test for Obama comes this Sunday, when our president will pay our respects at the Krakow funeral of Poland's freedom-loving president. If Obama allows himself to be photographed smoking and joking with Putin or Medvedev at a Polish grave, it'll send a horrible signal throughout a region that only escaped Moscow's terror two decades ago.

Putin's certainly not a good man. But he is a great man -- perhaps the most capable national leader of our time. He's also a very dangerous man. (Of course )

The really bad news? I can't spot a single potential president in either of our political parties who'd be a match for the guy.

It's heartbreaking when an old KGB hand consistently triumphs over the products of the mediocrity mills our moribund political parties have become"


P.S. I've noticed that I often see Putin without necktie on meetings in our country. It means something!

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Old 16-09-2012, 09:02 PM   #43
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Putin marks 10 years of extraordinary achievement
http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/politi...0110-m0n1.html

"A decade ago this month, Boris Yeltsin handed the reins of Russia to Vladimir Putin. It was a good day for Russia and the world. Putin is Russia's finest leader since Peter the Great.

Western profiles of Putin usually begin with ''ex-KGB agent'' but that is misleading. As a spy in West Germany in the 1980s, Putin witnessed the superiority of the free market. After the 1989 revolutions, Putin moved to St Petersburg to join his friend and former university lecturer, the mayor, Anatoly Sobchak - the Milton Friedman of Russia - and was appointed to attract foreign investment to Russia's second largest city. When Yeltsin defied Soviet tanks in Moscow in 1991, Sobchak performed the same heroic feat in St Petersburg. During those momentous days, when Russia's fate was in the balance, Putin resigned from the KGB to work against the Soviet coup.

Putin stayed with free-market Sobchak until 1996, when he moved to Moscow, ended the Chechen revolt and in August 1999 was appointed Yeltsin's fifth prime minister in 17 months. Four months later, Yeltsin resigned as president and, under Russia's constitution, Putin became acting president.

He called an election, further entrenching the rule of law, in which 75 per cent of Russians voted, winning a 53 per cent majority in a field of 12 candidates. Four years later he was re-elected with a thumping 71 per cent mandate and has since enjoyed the highest approval rating of any political leader in the democratic world.

Putin inherited an economic catastrophe. In 1998, Russia defaulted on its foreign debt and the rouble collapsed. His first public commitment - to double the productive capacity of the Russian economy in 10 years - was met with derision, but has been fulfilled.

When Time magazine asked Putin how a lifelong KGB man raised in the Soviet Union become a believer in free markets, he replied: ''One doesn't have to be a particularly bright highbrow to see the obvious, that the market economy has major advantages over an administrative system.''

In the Putin decade, Russia followed the advice of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, with average annual economic growth of 7 per cent. Foreign debt has been repaid before it fell due and international bond investors now bemoan the shortage of its public debt.

Real wages have grown at about 12 per cent a year. In 2001, Putin achieved the holy grail of progressive reform - a flat income tax of 13 per cent, creating a wave of incentive to work while reducing the appeal of the black market.

At the same time, he cut corporate tax from 35 to 24 per cent and gave small businesses a choice - pay 6 per cent of gross revenue in tax or 15 per cent of profits. The former Soviet Union now boasts the lowest taxes in Europe while achieving increases in government revenue.

Western critics predicted Putin would use the global financial crisis as a pretext to increase state control, but the reverse has been the case. Russia has embarked on a new round of privatisation, with 5500 state-owned enterprises earmarked for sale.

The World Bank reported: "Russia's strong short-term macroeconomic fundamentals make it better prepared than many emerging economies to deal with the crisis . . . prudent fiscal management and substantial financial reserves have protected Russia from deeper consequences of this external shock.'' Its sharemarket more than doubled last year, giving its investors the best returns of any bourse.

Putin's Russia has floated its currency and liberalised its current and capital accounts, completing the troika required for full integration into international capital markets. In 2000, Russia's economy was ranked 22nd in the world - now it is seventh. The power of oligarchs diminished under Putin, with the growing counterweight of parliament, the rule of law and a middle class that has exploded from 8 million to 55 million. Those living in poverty fell from 30 per cent to 14 per cent under his watch.

Yeltsin gave independence to 15 former Soviet republics and, although Putin is perceived as a tough guy, the empire is not striking back. John McCain wrongly attempted to characterise the Georgia skirmish as a "resurgence of the Soviet bear". South Ossetia was historically part of Georgia but during the Soviet era its population became dominated by ethnic Russians. Today the vast majority of South Osettians want to be part of Russia. Georgians launched an offensive to retake South Ossetia during the Beijing Olympics and Russia resisted. South Ossetia may be a complex story but comparisons with Budapest in 1956 are wrong.

While the Soviets repressed all religious faith, Putin happily wears a cross, admits to studying the Bible and has largely restored the prestige of the Russian Orthodox Church.

The Russian media may be excessively pro-Putin but only a fraction more or less than the US media have been towards President Barack Obama. It is distressing and disturbing that several Russian journalists have been murdered during Putin's administration. In the absence of persuasive evidence to the contrary, I can only accept Putin's own logic that their deaths have caused him more damage than anything they could have written or spoken.

Russia is the largest geographic nation and the ninth most populous. It retains the largest stockpile of weapons of mass destruction. Everyone on Earth has an interest in Russia's stability and prosperity. It seems likely that Putin will stand again for president in 2012, as the constitution permits. In view of his extraordinary record of achievement in office, its hard for me to see how anyone of good faith could regret his continued influence in Russia and the world."

Ross Cameron is a former federal MP for Parramatta.

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Old 17-09-2012, 12:11 AM   #44
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Exclamation SS 18 Satan


The R-36, (Russian: Р-36) is a family of intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) and space launch vehicles designed by the Soviet Union during the Cold War. The original R-36 was produced under the Soviet industry designation 8K67 and was given the NATO reporting name SS-9 Scarp. The later version, the R-36M was produced under the GRAU designations 15A14 and 15A18 and was given the NATO reporting name SS-18 Satan. This missile was viewed by certain U.S. analysts as giving the Soviet Union first strike advantage over the U.S., particularly because of its very heavy throw weight and extremely large number of re-entry vehicles. Some versions of the R-36M were deployed with 10 warheads and up to 40 penetration aids and the missile's high throw-weight made it theoretically capable of carrying more warheads or penetration aids. Contemporary U.S. missiles, such as the Minuteman III, carried up to three warheads at most...



Missiles of the R-36M/SS-18 family have never been deployed with more than ten warheads, but given their large throw-weight (8.8 tonnes as specified in START), they have the capacity to carry considerably more detonation power. Among the projects that the Soviet Union considered in the mid-1970s was that of a 15A17 missile—a follow-on to the R-36MUTTH (15A18). The missile would have had an even greater throw-weight—9.5 tonnes—and would be able to carry a very large number of warheads. Five different versions of the missile were considered. Three of these versions would carry regular warheads—38 × 250 kt yield, 24 × 500 kt yield, or 15–17 × 1 Mt yield. Two modifications were supposed to carry guided warheads (“upravlyaemaya golovnaya chast”)—28 × 250 kt or 19 × 500 kt.[5] However, none of these upgraded models were ever developed. The SALT II Treaty, signed in 1979, prohibited increasing the number of warheads ICBMs could carry. Equally, from a strategic point of view, concentrating so many warheads on silo-based missiles was not seen as desirable, since it would have made a large proportion of the USSR's warheads vulnerable to a counterforce strike...
In the last decade Russian armed forces have been steadily reducing the number of R-36M missiles in service, withdrawing those that age past their designed operational lifetime. About 40 missiles of the most modern variant R-36M2 (or RS-20V) will remain in service until 2019 and will be then replaced by newer MIRV version of Topol-M. In March 2006 Russia made an agreement with Ukraine that will regulate cooperation between the two countries on maintaining the R-36M2 missiles. It was reported that the cooperation with Ukraine will allow Russia to extend the service life of the R-36M2 missiles by at least ten to 28 years...Several remaining SS-18 missiles have been modified for surface launch and now carry lightweight satellites to Low Earth Orbit (LEO), including many foreign payloads...


http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showt...=178579&page=5
http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showthread.php?t=157089
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Old 17-09-2012, 08:52 AM   #45
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About Afghanistan.... Scary war, yes...
Just have found something in English.

http://www.opendemocracy.net/od-russ...anistan-part-i
The Russians in Afghanistan

I don't know how it relates to the topic though...

About missiles - we should have them and a lot. Only because we have a lot of them, we exist, live and are not bombed. Thanks for great efforts of people of the Soviet Union.

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Old 17-09-2012, 09:27 PM   #46
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Lightbulb Fat Slow Generals getting obscene on Young Blood

Quote:
Originally Posted by jane_d View Post
About Afghanistan.... Scary war, yes...
Just have found something in English.

http://www.opendemocracy.net/od-russ...anistan-part-i
The Russians in Afghanistan

I don't know how it relates to the topic though...

About missiles - we should have them and a lot. Only because we have a lot of them, we exist, live and are not bombed. Thanks for great efforts of people of the Soviet Union.

All those poor young soldiers sent to their slaughter..always remember not one ploitician was harmed in the making of it...
Do you know we are ruled by T.V...

The moon is a dry blood beast
Guerrilla bands are rolling numbers
in the next block of green vine
amassing for warfare on innocent
herdsman who are just dying ...

When the true King's murderers are allowed to roam free a 1000 Magicians arise in the land...


http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showt...=178579&page=7
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Old 17-09-2012, 09:40 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by lightgiver View Post

All those poor young soldiers sent to their slaughter..always remember not one ploitician was harmed in the making of it...
Jim Morrison - An American Prayer (The poem). - YouTube
Do you know we are ruled by T.V...

The moon is a dry blood beast
Guerrilla bands are rolling numbers
in the next block of green vine
amassing for warfare on innocent
herdsman who are just dying ...

When the true King's murderers are allowed to roam free a 1000 Magicians arise in the land...


http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showt...=178579&page=7
I agree in this case. Were sent to slaughter another people. I left article there... You can read. It was a difficult and unclear situation for our leadership, too. And part of them didn't want this war.

But it is a thread about Putin...? He did not start any war. Our missiles "Satan" (and "Topol", "Topol-M ") keep peace for us... for a long time. They never were used and I hope never will. If we did not create this the most scary weapon, we already would be destroyed. And the world would already have this NWO in much more big scale.

It is ironic, but Satan serves us for peace.

Edit

America drew the Soviet Union in this war (Brzezinsky) and then helped to fight against us. Soviet Union allowed itself to be drawn...and also with the Afghan leadership's requests..

But we built in Afghanistan some things. Dams, hydroelectric power, gas pipelines, factories, hospitals...

P.S. Sorry for editing.

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Old 17-09-2012, 09:51 PM   #48
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Lightbulb Occultists

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Originally Posted by jane_d View Post
I agree in this case. Were sent to slaughter another people. I left article there... You can read. It was a difficult and unclear situation for our leadership, too. And part of them didn't want this war.

But it is a thread about Putin...? He did not start any war. Our missiles "Satan" (now "Topol' ") keep peace for us... for a long time. They never were used and I hope never will. If we did not create this the most scary weapon, we already would be destroyed. It is ironic, but Satan serves us for peace.
I think both sides were sent to slaughter each other just like in WW2 and WW1 etc etc etc...


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Old 17-09-2012, 11:12 PM   #49
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Exclamation Viva Vlad



Putin was born on October 7, 1952, in Leningrad, RSFSR, USSR (now Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation), to parents Vladimir Spiridonovich Putin (1911–1999) and Maria Ivanovna Putina (1911–1998). His mother was a factory worker, and his father was a conscript in the Soviet Navy, where he served in the submarine fleet in the early 1930s. Two elder brothers were born in the mid-1930s; one died within a few months of birth, while the second succumbed to diphtheria during the siege of Leningrad...
Vladimir Putin's paternal grandfather, Spiridon Ivanovich Putin (1879–1965), was employed at Vladimir Lenin's dacha at Gorki as a cook, and after Lenin's death in 1924, he continued to work for Lenin's wife, Nadezhda Krupskaya. He would later cook for Joseph Stalin when the Soviet leader visited one of his dachas in the Moscow region. Spiridon later was employed at a dacha belonging to the Moscow City Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, at which the young Putin would visit him.
The ancestry of Vladimir Putin has been described as a mystery with no records surviving of any ancestors of any people with the surname "Putin" beyond his grandfather Spiridon Ivanovich. It has been suggested that the Putins are descended from the royal Tverskoy family. The 'family book' of the Tver region where Spiridon was from mentions the name of Putyanin who it claims were a clan of Russian aristocrats descended from Mikhail of Tver, the Grand Prince of Tver in the Middle Ages. It became common practice for family names associated with the former aristocracy to be abbreviated, e.g. Repnin becoming "Pnin" and, perhaps, Putyanin becoming "Putin".

Quote:
Grigori Yefimovich Rasputin (22 January [O.S. 10 January] 1869 – 29 or 30 December [O.S. 16 December] 1916) was a Russian Orthodox Christian and mystic who is perceived as having influenced the latter days of the Russian Emperor Nicholas II, his wife Alexandra, and their only son Alexei. Some people called Rasputin the "Mad Monk", while others considered him a "strannik" (or religious pilgrim) and even a starets (ста́рец, "elder", a title usually reserved for monk-confessors), believing him to be a psychic and faith healer.
http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showp...6&postcount=21
http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showt...post1060937142
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Old 18-09-2012, 03:07 AM   #50
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lightgiver, you should try to be a little more straight to the point.
not everyone is a synchromystic.
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Old 19-09-2012, 04:46 PM   #51
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USAID booted out of Russia

The US Agency for International Development (USAID) says it is withdrawing from Russia after Moscow decided to call a halt to the agency’s work in the country.

“The United States recently received the Russian government’s decision to end USAID activities in the Russian Federation,” US State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland was quoted as saying on Tuesday.

Over the past two decades, USAID has spent more than $2.6 billion in Russia to help environmental protection and economic modernization programs and efforts to combat infectious diseases.

“While USAID’s physical presence in Russia will come to an end, we remain committed to supporting democracy, human rights, and the development of a more robust civil society in Russia and look forward to continuing our cooperation with Russian non-governmental organizations (NGOs),” Nuland said.

"It is our hope that Russia will now itself assume full responsibility and take forward all of this work that we were proud to do together so that the Russian people continue to have the benefit," she added.

Russia told the United States last week that USAID should end its activities in the country. While Nuland would not be drawn on the reasons given for Moscow's decision, she said it was more "their sense that they don't need this anymore."

Russian President Vladimir Putin has accused the United States of fomenting unrest through its support for NGOs in Russia.

Following the announcement, the Russian government on Wednesday said the United States had been using its aid mission in Moscow to ‘influence Russian politics and presidential elections.’

“It's about attempts to influence political processes, including elections of various types, and institutions of civil society through the distribution of grants,” the Russian Foreign Ministry said in a statement.

The former US ambassador to Ukraine, Steven Pifer, said the decision reflected Russia’s reluctance to see foreign support for pro-democracy efforts on its territory.

"They see the AID’s efforts in Russia as being a prime funder of the NGOs that are concerned about their elections and concerned about the regression of democracy in Russia," Pifer said.

USAID has offices in more than 100 countries.



On Russian Decision to End USAID Activities in Russia

http://www.state.gov/r/pa/prs/ps/2012/09/197846.htm

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Old 19-09-2012, 05:38 PM   #52
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hmm... so it does seem he is a good guy. taking "extreme" measures to protect russia.
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Old 20-09-2012, 09:47 AM   #53
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some of this & some of that

he's a two faced person , when the NATO wanted to go into Libya he stood in its way just because he was afraid to lose the Russian investments in Libya , but when the American government gave him Compensations for his loss , he got out of the way and allowed them to go in and burn Libya to the ground

on the other hand , he seem to be wordy , he always supports the third world causes but when it comes to action on reality the only thing he can do is VETO in the Security Council
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Old 20-09-2012, 11:32 AM   #54
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some of this & some of that

he's a two faced person, when the NATO wanted to go into Libya he stood in its way just because he was afraid to lose the Russian investments in Libya, but when the American government gave him Compensations for his loss, he got out of the way and allowed them to go in and burn Libya to the ground

on the other hand, he seem to be wordy, he always supports the third world causes but when it comes to action on reality the only thing he can do is VETO in the Security Council
Hello..

And Gaddafi? Libya ordered the military equipment from Russia worth $ 4 billion. This order was made only after the Russian authorities cancelled Libya's debt to the USSR of $ 8 billion. We have written off all debts, and Gaddafi did not pay for his new order. Accordingly, Gaddafi also received no Russian military equipment. He just made this order for writing off the old debt. Although, Libya could pay us these money very easily. Gaddafi has deceived Russia. In spite of this, among the Russian people an opinion could be heard that the Libyans had to protect Gaddafi strongly, because he has done a lot in the interests of his country and his people. But anyway, I feel very sorry for them all....

Despite these relations with Gaddafi personally, no one can say what would be if Putin was a president then. Now he is a president - and look at Syria. It was Medvedev, and Medvedev - just a Zionist puppet, including judging by Russia's domestic policy. Medvedev sold Libya. Putin reacted very differently than Medvedev on the events in Libya. Now I see that Putin has almost openly expressed his grievances to Medvedev and to our government on many issues. He suppresses them more now ... It's really inspiring to see.

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Old 20-09-2012, 12:24 PM   #55
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Hello..

And Gaddafi? Libya ordered the military equipment from Russia worth $ 4 billion. This order was made only after the Russian authorities cancelled Libya's debt to the USSR of $ 8 billion. We have written off all debts, and Gaddafi did not pay for his new order. Accordingly, Gaddafi also received no Russian military equipment. He just made this order for writing off the old debt. Although, Libya could pay us these money very easily. Gaddafi has deceived Russia. In spite of this, among the Russian people an opinion could be heard that the Libyans had to protect Gaddafi strongly, because he has done a lot in the interests of his country and his people. But anyway, I feel very sorry for them all....

Despite these relations with Gaddafi personally, no one can say what would be if Putin was a president then. Now he is a president - and look at Syria. It was Medvedev, and Medvedev - just a Zionist puppet, including judging by Russia's domestic policy. Medvedev sold Libya. Putin reacted very differently than Medvedev on the events in Libya. Now I see that Putin is almost openly expressed his grievances to Medvedev and to our government on many issues. He suppresses them more now ... It's really inspiring to see.


i agree , Medvedev sold us out , but i remember what Puttin the first day of war in Libya , he said : (( it reminds me of the Crusader wars )) , when we heard this statement my father started clapping in a sign of respect towards Puttin .

i saw everything that happened in Libya , i witnessed the battles , i witnessed massacres , the problem is not because of the oppressing regime of Gaddafi , the real problem is that America made us busy killing each other while they were taking over everything


but that doesn't mean that Gaddafi & Asad are right to kill their own people , it's wrong i know , but the problem is with propagandized media that pushes the civilians to go out and protest unarmed

while i still say , America gave Medvedev a Indemnity instead of his losses in Libya , but they gave him more than he deserves , Gaddafi could have paid his debt 10 TIMES instead of 8 billion $ ,he had billions of dollars in most of the banks in the world , and when his accounts were frozen he used the money he had inside Libya , which it was at least 70 billion $ , but most of it was stolen by the rebels , and don't forget about the Priceless treasures he was hiding in his compounds

hope that explained a lot
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Old 20-09-2012, 07:13 PM   #56
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i agree , Medvedev sold us out , but i remember what Puttin the first day of war in Libya , he said : (( it reminds me of the Crusader wars )) , when we heard this statement my father started clapping in a sign of respect towards Puttin .

i saw everything that happened in Libya , i witnessed the battles , i witnessed massacres , the problem is not because of the oppressing regime of Gaddafi , the real problem is that America made us busy killing each other while they were taking over everything


but that doesn't mean that Gaddafi & Asad are right to kill their own people , it's wrong i know , but the problem is with propagandized media that pushes the civilians to go out and protest unarmed

while i still say , America gave Medvedev a Indemnity instead of his losses in Libya , but they gave him more than he deserves , Gaddafi could have paid his debt 10 TIMES instead of 8 billion $ ,he had billions of dollars in most of the banks in the world , and when his accounts were frozen he used the money he had inside Libya , which it was at least 70 billion $ , but most of it was stolen by the rebels , and don't forget about the Priceless treasures he was hiding in his compounds

hope that explained a lot
It's so sad what they have done with Libya and with people... So rich country... And all is ruined and stolen. I read that Libyans were very rich with Gaddafi and lived good. It's always strange when all paint someone as "bloody tyrant", but when you read, you learn that people lived good etc. Where is the truth? In the middle, I suppose? I trust much more to people who really live in place which I'm interested in.

Putin also is a "tyrant and maniac".

OMG, thanks God, Stalin ("bloody tyrant and maniac") and Soviet people, that we have nuclear missiles and peace.... Putin now is arming Russia with new weapons, too...

Last edited by jane_d; 20-09-2012 at 07:37 PM.
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Old 20-09-2012, 10:12 PM   #57
omar revo
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Originally Posted by jane_d View Post
It's so sad what they have done with Libya and with people... So rich country... And all is ruined and stolen. I read that Libyans were very rich with Gaddafi and lived good. It's always strange when all paint someone as "bloody tyrant", but when you read, you learn that people lived good etc. Where is the truth? In the middle, I suppose? I trust much more to people who really live in place which I'm interested in.

Putin also is a "tyrant and maniac".

OMG, thanks God, Stalin ("bloody tyrant and maniac") and Soviet people, that we have nuclear missiles and peace.... Putin now is arming Russia with new weapons, too...
here's the truth , the Libyans lived good at Gaddafi's time but looking to it as an Oil rich country , Libyans should have lived way better than that , but now the economy is going towards Capitalism which is going to cause a real problem in the future if America had economic problems , it would make America enslave us with its " Freedom & Democracy " project
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Old 21-09-2012, 12:36 AM   #58
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Putin's "opposition to the NWO" is pure political theatre, imho. People need to realize that left/right is about more than just irrelevant political parties. There are two different visions of the NWO, but both roads lead to World Government in the end. Exposing one side doesn't mean someone is a "good guy".

Just my humble opinion..
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Old 21-09-2012, 07:11 AM   #59
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Originally Posted by kappy0405 View Post
Putin's "opposition to the NWO" is pure political theatre, imho. People need to realize that left/right is about more than just irrelevant political parties. There are two different visions of the NWO, but both roads lead to World Government in the end. Exposing one side doesn't mean someone is a "good guy".

Just my humble opinion..
His "opposition" is clearly expressed in the fact that he defends our interests as Russian people... Well, and in external policy, too.

I read a lot and even was confused in some moment when I came across with bloody western propaganda, which sowed doubts in my mind. Now I clearly see and feel, what information war is. Putin is blamed absolutely in everything by them... So many lies and black rumours. In fact, he has done a lot of very good and important things in our country but corrupt journalists rarely write about it...

And now he is in a very risky situation. They failed with "peaceful protests", but will they stop? I don't know... Why someone fires on buses in Moscow and St. Petersburg from pneumatic and traumatic guns? It is happening constantly and often, since spring of this year. What's the next?..

And Caucasus, of course. They now try to destabilise it...

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Old 05-10-2012, 01:10 PM   #60
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http://rt.com/politics/putin-west-sy...sia-chaos-128/

Putin blames West for global chaos

The Russian leader did not hesitate to name who is responsible for sowing the seeds of disorder that is gripping many parts of the world, including in Syria.

"Our partners just can't stop,” Putin said at a meeting with representatives of one of Russia's regions. “They have already created chaos in many territories, and now they are continuing the same policy in other countries, including Syria."

Commenting on the "Arab Spring" and the ongoing Syrian conflict, he said: "Our position is to help carry out changes for the better in all countries but not to try to force on them – especially by armed force – what we consider to be right.”

It is important to encourage developments from within, Putin stressed.

The Russian leader criticized the militant foreign policy of the West, arguing that Russia’s repeated warnings went unheeded.

"We did warn that prudent action was needed and that it would be wrong to try to achieve anything by force, otherwise chaos would ensue,” he said. “And what do we see today? Chaos prevails.”

Russia is concerned about developments in many regions, including Afghanistan, where heroin production and drug trafficking has hit Russia and Europe. In the Middle East the situation is hardly more inspiring, with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad struggling against an armed opposition, which is said to comprise of members of terrorist groups, including al-Qaeda.

The United States, which recently lost its Libyan Ambassador following a wave of anti-American violence, has not managed to avoid the consequences of its behavior. In a growing number of countries, leaders (Muammar Gaddafi of Libya, Saddam Hussein of Iraq and Slobodan Milosevich of Serbia, for example) who fell out of favor with the West have been eliminated one way or another.

The new tendency for ‘regime change,’ however, has not made these countries any safer. Indeed, in many cases the violence and chaos is worse now than it was before Western foreign intervention began.

To support his argument, Putin recommended Western leaders remember the lessons of history so as not to “destroy Carthage again" in their relations with weak countries.

"I would hate to see the events witnessed by mankind many centuries ago repeat themselves now,” he said. “The strong countries are trying to push their rules and their moral code on weak countries, without taking into account the history, traditions and religion of a particular country."

The Russian leader then mentioned what he said was “the first case of ethnic cleansing known to mankind.”

"The Roman Empire not only seized and occupied Carthage, but also destroyed it completely, killed everyone and spilled salt so that nothing could grow there," Putin noted.

Not only should the good things inherited from European culture be remembered, he added.

In his opinion, Russia "has always been advantageously different from other countries due to its formation as a multinational and multi-religious state."

Orthodoxy has always been very tolerant, he noted.

"The super-task is that a representative of each, even the smallest ethnic group, if he lives in this territory and is a citizen of this country, must feel absolutely equal and understand that he and his children can fulfill their most ambitious plans and have no restrictions, no limitations," he said.

The Russian state had never dictated its will on anyone or pushed its rules, he noted.

He stressed that what transpired during the Soviet period in Russian history could not be blamed solely on Russia because the “idea of world revolution was being forced on other territories."

On the whole, "we have always respected all ethnic groups, peoples and religions inside the country and have tried to behave the same way on the international scene," he stressed.

"The preservation of inter-religious peace" is extremely important for Russia, said Putin, who expressed his support in working with other countries to achieve this goal.
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