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Old 21-01-2010, 04:54 PM   #181
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Originally Posted by wakeup2nwo View Post
Anyone with NEW information on the implementation of RFID chips NANO chips or VERI chips, Please keep this Thread updated... Its our Future of control unless we learn and teach others the endgame to RFID technology.
Thanks!



The most recent story's are..........



Massachusetts General Uses RFID to Better Understand Its Clinics


A patient- and employee-tracking system, provided by Radianse, will enable the Boston hospital's clinics to gather complex information regarding patient flow and bottlenecks, with the goal of improving care.
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By Claire Swedberg

Oct. 23, 2009—After several years of testing RFID to track patients and staff members in its operating room (OR) department, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) is now rolling out the same technology in a more challenging environment in which patient movement is not nearly as predictable—at medical clinics throughout the Boston area. Provided by Radianse, the system, known as Radianse Reveal, includes active 433 MHz RFID tags in the form of badges worn by workers and patients. Thus far, three clinics are employing Radianse Reveal, with the system slated to go live at another five locations by the end of the first quarter of 2010.

"Our incentive is to gain a better understanding of how our clinical systems behave," says James Stahl, a medical doctor and senior scientist with MGH's Institute for Technology Assessment. Unlike the tracking of assets or patients through an OR, tracking patients' movements through a clinic, Stahl says, "is a very complex system in terms of how resources are managed."


James Stahl, a senior scientist with MGH's Institute for Technology Assessment
While the goal is to provide patients with better access to care, understanding the movements of those patients and the care they receive is a daunting task that must be undertaken before MGH can determine how such a scenario can be improved. No patient is like any other, nor are his or her conditions and the treatments he or she requires. Although clinics can use anecdotal evidence to determine whether care is being provided as efficiently as possible, without a good means of measuring each visit, it's difficult to know what improvements to make. For example, it's not easy to track where delays had occurred, whether a physician spent the proper time with a patient, or how long a patient sat alone in an examining room.

The three MGH Boston clinics utilizing the system typically serve 20 to 40 patients per physician each day, with approximately three physicians at each location. Two of the clinics installing the system see patients on a scheduled basis, while one is a walk-in clinic.

In 2005, Massachusetts General set up a trial of Radianse RFID technology to track employees and patients in its OR unit. At the time, Stahl served as the research director of the trial project, known as the Operating Room of the Future (ORF). The project's goal was to determine whether RFID technology could track the movements of patients and staff members, and improve the operation room workflow based on that data. The technology is still in place in the OR, Stahl says, but has been deactivated for the time being.

The use of RFID at the clinics is a permanent deployment that will initially be employed for business analytics, Stahl says; in the future, however, the technology is expected to be used by the staff for alerts and real-time locating. As a physician, Stahl suspected that the medical clinics could be made more efficient, but he lacked sufficient data to enable the hospital to understand the systems, and how patients received their care. "People are complex," he states. "To understand the system behavior, you need to use a tool like RFID." The hospital wanted to be able to track not only patient flow at its clinics, but also where people come together, in order to learn how much time patients were spending one-on-one with physicians. With the RFID system, Stahl reports, they now have the infrastructure to begin studying how the clinics function.

Each physician is assigned a Radianse ID badge that can be pinned to a jacket or attached to a lanyard. The unique ID number encoded to the badge's battery-powered 433 MHz RFID tag is linked to the physician's name in the Radianse software. Radianse readers installed in the clinics' ceilings receive that ID number, transmitted by the tag at a rate of every 10 seconds. The readers, with a read range of approximately 30 feet, can pinpoint a tag's location within about 3 feet, using triangulation. Typically, at least three readers capture a tag's transmission at any given time. About 15 to 25 readers are installed at each site, based on a clinic's size, says Steve Schiefen, Radianse's president and CEO.


Steve Schiefen, Radianse's president and CEO
When a patient arrives at the clinic, he or she is registered and given a Radianse ID badge. The staff member first inputs information regarding the patient, then scans a bar code on the tag to link that individual with the ID number encoded to the badge's RFID tag. From that moment, the patient's whereabouts within the building can be tracked. The system stores data regarding where the patient goes, how long he or she remains in any particular location, and the length of time the person spends with clinical employees. At the end of his or her visit, the patient places the badge in a basket at the reception desk so that a subsequent patient can reuse it.

Workers could sign into the Radianse software to locate a specific patient in the facility at any given time, Stahl says, though at this stage, the system is being used for historic information—to determine what may be a bottleneck in the system, for instance. The clinic can also study the impact of any change in patient care that it might introduce. For example, if the center begins utilizing a new electronic medical records system, the Radianse data could be analyzed following that introduction, in order to determine how the new system affected patient flow.

http://www.rfidjournal.com/article/view/5324/2

Savi Receives $6.6 Million Order to Supply RFID Tracking Technologies from U.S. Department of Defense

Buffalo, New York 10/23/2009 02:25 AM GMT (TransWorldNews)


[I]
Lockheed Martin's (NYSE: LMT) business unit Savi, has been awarded orders totaling $6.6 million for standards based active Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking technologies and accompanying services under the U.S. Department of Defense's RFID procurement contract. The RFID tags, are attached to cargo containers and other supply chain assets enabling near real time supply visibility with allied defense force and organizations.


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About Lockheed Martin

Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin is a global security company that employs about 140,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services. The corporation reported 2008 sales of $42.7 billion.


http://www.transworldnews.com/NewsSt...storyid=132345

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KhnKHtfCeRo

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lH4U5ASd4Vg

Ill do my best to update daily
FFS there is no conspiracy. Chips will never be implanted into us. They are already in our phones. There are easier ways.

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Old 21-01-2010, 05:03 PM   #182
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Historically, articles looking at RFID in the coming year have focused on supply chain or asset tracking or access control or smart phones or any of a dozen other key applications where RFID could offer significant advantages. It's true that market growth is important. But the roll-out of applications that don't include adequate security precautions poses a potential risk not only to the users of the technology but to the entire industry.

http://www.itrportal.com/absolutenm/...6107&zoneid=45
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Old 21-01-2010, 06:25 PM   #183
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Originally Posted by aussiegirl View Post
Chips will never be implanted into us.
You realize that many people have already done this, right?
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Old 22-01-2010, 03:06 PM   #184
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Hi-tech gear for tomorrow's traveler

A look at some technology that will improve everything from a walk to a round-the-world trip to juicing up portable electronics

As if to prove that wireless RFID (or near-field) technology really is the future, Japanese healthcare specialist Tanita has managed to fit it into one of the most humble gadgets on the market -- a common pedometer.



Tanita’s ¥7,035 ($77) FB-730 (PDF) is a dull-looking step-counter designed to be worn on a waistband, but which comes with a trick up its sleeve.

Instead of just giving a readout of distance traveled and calories burned, the device shoots the data off to a nearby RFID travel card of the type common on train and bus networks in Japan, Hong Kong and London.

Whether you’re holding a Suica card, an Octopus or an Oyster, the technology’s the same -– the card holds data such as prepaid balance, a monthly pass or, in this case, a workout summary.

Once home, the data can be synced with a PC and uploaded to the company’s Karada Karute (Body Card) website, where ongoing progress can be monitored or, most likely, ignored after the first few spins round the staggeringly complex maze of options.

Potenco PCG1 Personal Device Charger
Potenco PCG1 Personal Device Charger.
Although Tanita’s system currently works only in Japan, the possibility of taking the combined healthcare and travel card global is clear.

Tanita’s elderly target customers aren’t likely to wander too far on the daily constitutional, but if they do there’s always the option of tracking them using the new Trackstick Mini, a GPS route recorder that promises unprecedented accuracy.

The US$300 gizmo monitors every aspect of any trip, from location and travel speed to altitude and even temperature. Naturally, the whole record can be uploaded to a website or even combined with geotagged photos snapped en route.

One last piece of travel gear that might appeal to tech fans is the upcoming Potenco PCG1 Personal Device Charger, which does precisely that -– it juices up a range of portable gadgets.

Although Potenco is still looking for funding to actually market the product, the ability to pull a ripcord and charge anything that can be powered up via a USB is very compelling.

The company says yanking the chain for a minute is enough to power an MP3 player (read, iPod) for six hours or a phone for 20 minutes of talk time. We’re keeping our eyes peeled for this one, so come on angel investors.

Read more: Hi-tech gear for tomorrow's traveler | CNNGo.com http://www.cnngo.com/explorations/no...#ixzz0dMFEMADB
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Old 24-01-2010, 01:46 PM   #185
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There are multiple problems with chipping people - but Verichip won't tell you that.


1. Look at the cancer rates.
2. Affects heart pacemakers.
3. the antenna move and embed in the wrong tissue.
4. in certain situations the antenna can "heat up" and burn the patient from the inside (air port scanners etc).
5. Surgical removal of the chip - isnt pleasant.



None of these issues are addressed by Verichip.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...800997_pf.html

Published in veterinary and toxicology journals between 1996 and 2006, the studies found that lab mice and rats injected with microchips sometimes developed subcutaneous "sarcomas" _ malignant tumors, most of them encasing the implants.

_ A 1998 study in Ridgefield, Conn., of 177 mice reported cancer incidence to be slightly higher than 10 percent _ a result the researchers described as "surprising."

_ A 2006 study in France detected tumors in 4.1 percent of 1,260 microchipped mice. This was one of six studies in which the scientists did not set out to find microchip-induced cancer but noticed the growths incidentally. They were testing compounds on behalf of chemical and pharmaceutical companies; but they ruled out the compounds as the tumors' cause. Because researchers only noted the most obvious tumors, the French study said, "These incidences may therefore slightly underestimate the true occurrence" of cancer.

_ In 1997, a study in Germany found cancers in 1 percent of 4,279 chipped mice. The tumors "are clearly due to the implanted microchips," the authors wrote.

Caveats accompanied the findings. "Blind leaps from the detection of tumors to the prediction of human health risk should be avoided," one study cautioned. Also, because none of the studies had a control group of animals that did not get chips, the normal rate of tumors cannot be determined and compared to the rate with chips implanted.

Still, after reviewing the research, specialists at some pre-eminent cancer institutions said the findings raised red flags.

"There's no way in the world, having read this information, that I would have one of those chips implanted in my skin, or in one of my family members," said Dr. Robert Benezra, head of the Cancer Biology Genetics Program at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York.

Before microchips are implanted on a large scale in humans, he said, testing should be done on larger animals, such as dogs or monkeys. "I mean, these are bad diseases. They are life-threatening. And given the preliminary animal data, it looks to me that there's definitely cause for concern."
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Old 24-01-2010, 03:16 PM   #186
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RFID Chip Conspiracy: Why TV Abandoned Analog

http://www.conspiracyplanet.com/chan...contentid=6610

by DPROGRAM.NET

RFID Chip Conspiracy: Why TV Abandoned Analog (January 21st, 2010) According to a former 31-year IBM employee, the highly-publicized, mandatory switch from analog to digital television is mainly being done to free up analog frequencies and make room for scanners used to read implantable RFID microchips and track people and products throughout the world.

So while the American people, especially those in Texas and other busy border states, have been inundated lately with news reports advising them to hurry and get their expensive passports, "enhanced driver's licenses," passport cards and other "chipped" or otherwise trackable identification devices that they are being forced to own, this digital television/ RFID connection has been hidden, according to Patrick Redmond.

Redmond, a Canadian, held a variety of jobs at IBM before retiring, including working in the company’s Toronto lab from 1992 to 2007, then in sales support. He has given talks, written a book and produced a DVD on the aggressive, growing use of passive, semi-passive and active RFID chips (Radio Frequency Identification Devices) implanted in new clothing, in items such as Gillette Fusion blades, and in countless other products that become one’s personal belongings.
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Old 24-01-2010, 03:18 PM   #187
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Here's How to Disable the RFID Chip

http://www.conspiracyplanet.com/chan...contentid=6611

Here's how to disable the RFID chip

Take a camera with a high-powered flash (not just a point-n-shoot camera, but a professional SLR) and aim it directly at the chip, within an inch or so of the chip (in your bank card, ID, etc.). then fire the flash.

I did this with a bank card (accidentally) while trying to see where the chip was located within a bank card.

The chip was instantly shorted-out and while the bank card still worked in traditional ATM swipe machines, the chip was completely disabled.
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Old 24-01-2010, 08:17 PM   #188
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Originally Posted by wakeup2nwo View Post
Here's How to Disable the RFID Chip

Here's how to disable the RFID chip

Take a camera with a high-powered flash (not just a point-n-shoot camera, but a professional SLR) and aim it directly at the chip, within an inch or so of the chip (in your bank card, ID, etc.). then fire the flash.

^^This is interesting^^

I read the Spychips book - they tried to microwave the chip,but it burnt the pages /passport.

So if a SLR camera flash will do it that's brilliant, and easily done and passed off as "accidental".
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Old 25-01-2010, 08:08 PM   #189
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New Labour SS continue ID card push


From video description!
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The New Labour criminals continue to push their SS inspired ID card system, extending their scheme to 18-24 year olds in London. It's also been revealed that the Passport Application forms have been changed to add an ID card section, if you don't fill it in, you won't get your passport - but the ID card is not compulsory. More lies from the New Labour criminals.

I was very lucky to get this clip as it was not in the breakfast news, and was not in the main evening news either

Recorded from BBC London News, 25 January 2010.
does this mean that if you want to get a new passport you have to get the ID? WTF..

Dont Get one!!!!

Here is the Real Deal about the ID cards!


Quote:
ID cards have been around for a while, and in dozens of perfectly free societies they are little more than a way to verify how old someone is and whether they are qualified to operate a motor vehicle.

But these days, with the advent of RFID, ID cards can also be used to keep tabs on where a person is and what they are doing. If managed correctly, an authoritarian regime can know who is in the country, who is out of the country and where they have been in the meantime.

In 2008, the Chinese government outlined a plan to put RFID tags in as many as a billion ID cards, making the industry a booming new sector. The investment is believed to be as high as $6bn, meaning that there will be plenty of vendors willing to help you out.

Iain Thomson: In an interview with the head of the London computer crime unit I asked if ID cards would be a deterrent to crime. His answer, off the record, was “No, but illicit ID card factories will prosper.”

ID cards in the UK were first introduced in the UK during the First World War as a security measure (sound familiar anyone?) but abandoned once the war to end all wars was over. They were reintroduced in the Second World War and kept on after the Nazis were defeated until a Liberal called Clarence Henry Willcock refused to hand over his card and the law was changed, even though he lost his legal case.

One of the most disturbing things about living in the US is the first thing you hear from any policeman is “Show me your ID.” Without it you are an unperson, and subject to suspicion.

ID cards are a great way for repressive regimes to cow the populace. Take away someone's ID card in a society that fetishises them and you have a huge tool in disenfranchising those who believe in liberty.
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Old 25-01-2010, 10:51 PM   #190
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If you want to get more information about the ID cards there is the fabulous NO2ID forum for uk citizens.

PostPosted: Fri, 22 Jan 2010

An interesting insight in how the government is trying to coerce businesses into accepting ID cards:

http://www.is4profit.com/small-busin...ity-cards.html

"Identity cards are a Government-backed form of identification that you can trust."

They fail to mention the Computer World UK article from 6th August 2009 detailing how ID cards could easily be hacked and cloned within 12 minutes, here: http://www.computerworlduk.com/manag...m?newsid=16114
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Old 29-01-2010, 06:38 PM   #191
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We are (Official) Lab rats now!!!

Quote:
Friday, January 29, 2010

RFID Data Reveals London's Polycentric Pattern of Commuting

Data from London's commuters reveals travel patterns in unprecedented detail. It also raises privacy fears.



Since 2003, some 10 million RFID cards have been issued to commuters using the London transport network. The cards are precharged with credit which is then used to pay for journeys on buses and trains.

For scientists studying the behaviour of commuters, the system has generated a firehose of data. Camille Roth at the Institut des Systemes Complexes in Paris and a few buddies have got their hands on the data for the 11.2 million trips that took place during the week of 31 March to 6 April 2008. This data included the start and finishing point of each journey as well as the journey time.

The data gives one of the most detailed insights into commuting patterns ever assembled. It has long been known that London has three main centres for commuting: the West End, the City and the Midtown area between them. However, nobody has been able to tease apart the structure of commuting in any higher resolution.

Until now. The new data shows for the first time that that there are numerous smaller centres as well. These can be ranked according to their total inflow each day. Just behind the big three are centres such as the Docklands area in East London, the area around Parliament and the area to the south west of this near Victoria and Green Park, which the authors call the Government area.
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Old 30-01-2010, 04:13 PM   #192
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Europe to Begin Digital Privacy Overhaul

http://www.esecurityplanet.com/featu...y-Overhaul.htm

* January 29, 2010
* By Kenneth Corbin

A top European official has announced plans to begin a major overhaul of European Union privacy laws, saying that the existing framework has failed to keep pace with technological innovation.

Viviane Reding, the EU's Information Society and Media commissioner, said Thursday that she seeks to modernize the general privacy directive the EU has had in place since 1995, singling out social networks and RFID tracking tags as examples of technologies that have vaulted ahead of current statutes.

In a statement, Reding warned of the uncertainty -- both for consumers and businesses -- that will come as technology falls out of sync with the EU's legal framework.

"EU rules are there to protect everyone's personal data," Reding said. "EU rules should allow everyone to realize their right to know when their personal data can be lawfully processed, in any area of life, whether boarding a plane, opening a bank account or surfing the Internet, and to say no to it whenever they want."

Reding's announcement comes at a time of heightened awareness over Internet privacy matters among officials and lawmakers in several countries, including the United States.

The same day Reding made her comments -- a day that happened to be designated Data Privacy Day in Europe and North America -- the U.S. Federal Trade Commission held a day-long workshop exploring various aspects of the Internet privacy debate.

In broad strokes, the argument turns on the appropriate role of government in policing online data collection practices -- namely, should an agency like the FTC adopt binding rules that would set bright lines defining what type of information Web firms are permitted to collect and how they must obtain consent from consumers.

That friction was particularly evident at one session in yesterday's workshop, when representatives of Facebook and LinkedIn argued against setting rules that would govern the social networking space, particularly the third-party applications that are a fast-growing segment of the technology economy.
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Reding acknowledged that it's a difficult balance to strike, but reiterated her commitment to putting consumers first.

"Innovation is important in today's society but should not go at the expense of people's fundamental right to privacy," she said.

European regulators have historically taken a more assertive role in setting privacy standards than U.S. regulators. Many policy changes major U.S. Web companies have implemented, such as reducing the time users' IP addresses are stored in server logs, have come at the behest of European authorities.

In the meantime, Facebook finds itself back under the microscope in Canada, where regulators have opened an investigation into the site's recent changes to its privacy settings, responding to complaints that the new system encourages users to share more information than before.

It is perhaps a note of irony that Facebook's site-wide privacy revamp came at least in partial response to an inquiry from Canada's privacy commissioner, the same office that is heading up the new probe.

Facebook has staunchly defended its recent privacy overhaul, arguing that the new settings give people greater control over how they share information and have driven awareness about privacy across the community.

But those assurances haven't been enough to mollify some U.S. consumer-protection groups, who have banded together to file a complaint asking the FTC to open an investigation, charging that the changes are deceptive and violate consumer protection law.

Kenneth Corbin is an associate editor at InternetNews.com, the news service of Internet.com, the network for technology professionals.
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Old 01-02-2010, 12:07 AM   #193
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LIGHT ACTIVATED INJECTABLE RFID NANOCHIP: IDENTIFICATION CHIP


RFID Nanochip http://www.pharmaseq.com

Animal tagging PDF-
http://www.pharmaseq.com/PharmaSeq%2...te%20Paper.pdf

Barclay card advert-

RFID tags for animals represent one of the oldest uses of RFID technology. Originally meant for large ranches and rough terrain, since the outbreak of Mad Cow Disease, RFID has become crucial in animal identification management.

An implantable variety of RFID tags or transponders can also be used for animal identification. The transponders are more well-known as passive RFID technology, or simply "Chips" on animals.

The success of various animal identification uses since the early '90's has spurred RFID research into various human tracking alternatives.
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Old 02-02-2010, 10:54 AM   #194
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Dentist's breakthrough puts tell-all chip in tooth

http://www.post-trib.com/news/202167...h-0201.article

Quote:
Dentist's breakthrough puts tell-all chip in tooth

BY DIANE KRIEGER SPIVAK, (219) 648-3076
CROWN POINT -- Dr. Kevin Brunski wants to chip your tooth.

More specifically, the Crown Point dentist, who has a patent pending on his invention, I-Denti-Fied, hopes to one day see every person in the United States wearing the device -- a chip about the size of a grain of rice that stores a person's unique identification number linked to his or her entire medical history.

The code can only be read by a special "reader," a gun aimed at the client's mouth.

The device has Food and Drug Administration approval for implantation of the device into dentures.

Brunski is applying for approval for implantation into live teeth and bridges. The chip can only be placed in tooth implants that are porcelain. It will not work in tooth implants with titanium posts because the metal interferes with transmission of the code.

The chip is placed in teeth that most often experience decay, and filled in with the same resin that is used in fillings. It can also be bonded to the outside of a tooth in an inconspicuous place.

Health information can be updated from a Web site. The device costs about $150.

For more information on I-Denti-Fied, visit www.i-denti-fied.com

The chip is implanted in a tooth where it can neither be felt nor rejected by the body.

Brunski gave up his nearly 20-year dental practice a couple of years ago to devote all his time to market the I-Denti-Fied.

He got the idea four years ago after an Amber Alert had just appeared on television, notifying the viewing audience to keep an eye out for a missing child.

"I was disgusted with that. I went to pet my dog and felt this lump."

It was his Australian shepherd Chesney's microchip that Brunski felt.

"I said, 'Wait a minute, why can't we do this for our children, not like a Big Brother type of thing, but if they are lost or stolen?' " Brunski said. His first thought was to implant a chip into a tooth to help in identifying missing children, but he realized it could also hold critical health information in case of an emergency.

Brunski turned to the Internet to see if any such device was already on the market, but the ID chips at that time were larger and wouldn't fit inside a tooth.

Brunski tabled the idea, but kept researching to see if anyone had a smaller chip.

Finally, in fall of 2007 Brunski found a company in Luxemburg that manufactured a transponder 1 mm by 5 mm, the size of an uncooked grain of rice. He began benchtop studies with a denture and extracted human teeth in his office.

The chip, transponder, or "tag" holds a 16-digit code that unlocks a person's personal health record. Brunski partnered with a company that stores such records online.

"They are fully HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) compliant," Brunski emphasized, to protect client's health information privacy. The information can't be stolen because it isn't in the chip, and the code can only be read by a special "reader," a gun, produced by the same company, aimed at the client's mouth.

"No other reader can read it," Brunski said.

Because the product is so new and not yet universal, clients are also given a USB device that can be carried on a keychain. They also receive a wallet card and a sticker to be placed on their driver's license.

"It allows first responders and caregivers to have critical access to their information, especially for those with a chronic disease like Alzheimer's disease and dementia or special needs like autism and Down syndrome," said Brunski.

Even X-rays, allergies, family member contact information, insurance information and Do Not Resuscitate orders can be included.

A 24-hour call center can pull up the information and fax a patient's profile to any emergency department, Brunski said.

"... peace of mind"


Brunski also sees potential for the chip's use in such diverse applications as football players' mouth guards and disasters like the recent earthquake in Haiti.

Rocio Alcantar, who moved to Michigan from Whiting, had her East Chicago dentist Dr. Lawrence Adams install the device in her tooth in November.

"I always lived blocks from my family," said Alcantar, a diabetic who has had two kidney transplants. "It gives me and my family peace of mind."

"I've had handfuls of surgeries and I'm on so many medications, when my husband is at work and my son is in school, I'm completely alone with zero acquaintances," Alcantar said.

Alcantar likes the fact that she can control the information that goes into her personal health record, which can change weekly.

"They provide you with a Web site and USB port. You put in your password and you have access to edit your info. When I go to a doctor for the first time I can take the USB with me."

The implant process was painless, Alcantar said.

"It was less invasive than having a cavity filled," she said.

Currently those like Alcantar who have the device implanted into live teeth do so knowing it has not yet received FDA approval.

The cost is $150, including one year of membership on the Web site, Brunski said.

Currently, only three dentists in Northwest Indiana implant the devices. Dr. Annette Williamson, who practices in Crown Point, implanted one in her assistant Kristy Green's son's tooth.

"He's a senior at Valparaiso High School this year and he'll be going away to college," Green said.

"They don't have the readers yet, but his information is on the thumb drive and he has a wallet card. When I heard about it I immediately said, 'It's cool. I want my son to have that. It gives me peace of mind because if he's by himself and something happens, number one, they'll be able to get in touch with me."

Williamson, who attended dental school with Brunski, said she thinks the device is "a great idea.

"I used to service nursing homes for 15 years. Sometimes the residents leave and just wander," she said. "If they're injured and paramedics try to administer medication, their allergies and other information would be at their fingertips. Often, it's a matter of saving a life when time is of the essence."

Even if a patient is not sick Williamson said she sees the I-Denti-Fied as a time saver.

"In the dental field patients need to update their history every six months and people hate filling out paperwork," she said. "If they have all this information on a thumb drive they can just hand over. I can put it in my USB port, call it up and print it out."

"It's a safety issue as well," Williamson said. "We have so many health-care providers and specialists. Not one person has your complete record. It's a great way to cross reference."

Community outreach


Brunski has been working for more than a year with many home healthcare services in Lake County.

"We're a start-up company, so we're taking a community-based approach," he said.

Brunski is targeting fire departments and EMS personnel who are frequently in harm's way.

He'll give a presentation on I-Denti-Fied at the Crown Point Fire Rescue Department which will host the Feb. 17 meeting of Indiana Volunteer Firefighters Association's Districts 1 and 2 meeting.

"It takes dentistry out of the post-mortem era and brings it into the lifesaving era," Brunski said.

"My ultimate vision is that this would become a unique patient identifier, even as President Obama is supporting electronic medical records," he said.
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Old 02-02-2010, 11:30 AM   #195
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Czech Monks Look to RFID for Guidance

more... http://www.rfidjournal.com/article/a...view/7340/1/1/



Visitors to Vyssi Brod can rent electronic tour guides that describe the monastery's various sights, thus helping to provide the abbey with income.
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By Rhea Wessel

Jan. 26, 2010—A group of monks living in a 13th-century Czech monastery near the border of Austria are employing Near-Field Communication (NFC) RFID technology to provide visitors with access to recorded information in their own languages. The system's designers say it may be one of the first NFC applications for tours and tour guides.

Tens of thousands of people each year come to the Vyšší Brod Cistercian Abbey, to visit its churches, chapels and grounds. For security reasons, given the monastery's valuable relics, tourists must see the site in groups. If a guide is not available, a staff member must go along to unlock rooms. Often, a group is composed of visitors from around the world; this has presented a problem for those who do not speak Czech, or one of the other languages spoken by tour guides. In addition, during the off-season, language-appropriate guides are not always available.
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Old 02-02-2010, 08:25 PM   #196
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Links from video
LIVE SCIENCE
http://www.livescience.com/technolog...er-100128.html

RFID TAGGED LIPSTICK (WAL-MART)
http://www.livescience.com/technolog...re-robots.html

IMMIGRANTS GETTING CHIPPED (RFID)
http://www.livescience.com/technolog...fid_chips.html

PASSIVE RFID TAG
http://www.technovelgy.com/ct/Techno....asp?ArtNum=47

ACTIVE RFID TAG
http://www.technovelgy.com/ct/Techno....asp?ArtNum=21

SPYCHIPS (READ THIS !!! !!! !!!)
http://www.spychips.com/press-releas...migration.html

THIS IS ANOTHER LINK FOR THOSE THAT WISH TO PARTICIPATE AGAINST LAWS MANDATING RFID CHIP IMPLANTS AS STATE OF WISCONSIN ALREADY HAS !!!
http://www.spychips.com/get_involved.html
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Last edited by wakeup2nwo; 02-02-2010 at 08:26 PM.
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Old 05-02-2010, 05:22 PM   #197
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While I acknowledge that this technology does have it's benefits, i must also concede that the potential threat to one's privacy and individuality far outweigh any possible benefit in the long term.
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Old 08-02-2010, 01:15 AM   #198
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Default rice grain outside tooth would be awkward

Was reading the dentist post chip idea and if chip were outside tooth
give me a break. People would not put up with it if they could feel it with their tongue in their mouth.

This whole idea is SCARY and here is a PRIVATE citizen spending all his time developing this idea???? He went to dental school for how long and we
all know how much dentists make per year and he took all that time off
to develop it.

So the question is who was funding him, his wife worked 2 jobs to
pay his bills or was the govt secretly footing his bills? Cheaper than
a govt lab. He began his idea on the guise of helping locate
missing children. Since when do children need dentures or implants/crowns?

Luxembourg developed the chip technology. A country the size of
Rhode Island which besides a bit of tourism and lax business/bank
laws is not exactly on the forefront of anything.

Hmph.

People BRUSH and FLOSS your teeth lest you lose a tooth and require
microchipped dentures or implants!!!!!

Last edited by ladygoogoo; 08-02-2010 at 01:18 AM. Reason: add dental hygiene comment and child denture question
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Old 08-02-2010, 10:57 PM   #199
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Swiss Farm Store Tries RFID-enabled Self-Serve Shopping

http://www.rfidjournal.com/article/a...view/7378/1/1/

Customers can use Near Field Communication (NFC) cell phones to access the store, obtain product information and pay for purchases.
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By Andrew Curry

Feb. 8, 2010—Farmer-operated stores, which focus on locally produced foods, usually have a minimal staff and often lack a point-of-sale infrastructure, like credit-card terminals. That makes farm stores an ideal experimental setting for an RFID-enabled self-service commerce solution developed by a group of Swiss companies.

The system, which employs passive 13.56 MHz RFID tags compliant with the ISO 14443A standard, as well as RFID-enabled cell phones that support the Near Field Communication (NFC) specifications, is currently being tested at a Swiss farm store near Zurich.



After normal business hours, customers can use the phone's NFC RFID technology to enter the locked store.

"It's more of a community shop," says Alexander Schuemperli, the CEO of e24, the project's organizer.

E24 decided to begin with the farm store after larger retail chains turned it down, indicating that as long as NFC-based contactless payments were not on the same level as credit cards in terms of distribution, the technology wasn't worth trying. "We could not convince them to use the NFC platform for payments," Schuemperli says. From the farm store's point of view, however, a system that would enable them to receive credit-card payments without a costly infrastructure was an added attraction.



A sign at the farm store instructs customers about how to use the RFID-enabled system.

Using the phone, customers can scan an RFID tag attached to, say, a bottle of wine, to display such information as which company produced it, and when, then add that item to a "shopping cart" on the phone. (For bulk items such as apples, the tag is included in the product display, and customers are responsible for weighing their produce and entering the amount on the phone.) To read a tag, the phone needs to be placed within a few millimeters of it. The customer then pays for the desired goods via SIX Multi Solutions' Mobile Buy secure payment service, which links mobile-phone purchases to a Visa or MasterCard credit-card account.
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Old 10-02-2010, 02:16 AM   #200
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have i got a story about the chip, i can't talk now as i'm at work, but it left me mind blown what i found out to day......i will chat in a few hours...
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