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Old 26-10-2016, 09:30 PM   #1
fairdose
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Default David Icke in India

Just listened to the Ritchie Allen show with Jaymie Icke and they mentioned possibly going to India and how getting translators is key.

Why would you guys need a translator for India? Everyone there already speaks English since its a Commonwealth country and most of the people who follow David's work there are Indians who already speak and understand English perfectly.?

Just a suggestion, but if you guys do make it to India, try to pencil in Kolkata (Calcutta) since that is the most intellectual city in India. The money is in Mumbai (Bombay), the elite are in Delhi and probably the most tech-savvy are in Bangalore. Those four cities also cover East, South, West and North of the country.?
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Old 26-10-2016, 09:52 PM   #2
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Not all Indians learn to speak English....it would appear that it is a myth that all Indians or a very large percentage of them can speak and understand English.
http://www.forbes.com/sites/realspin.../#4f7786eb37be

Also, Indian English is a different dialect to the one DI uses.

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It is incomprehensible that the majority of people in India are being oppressed by the mere lack of knowledge of a language. By not having medical instructions, food ingredient labels and nutritional information, government forms, access to the courts and politicians, street signs, and even movie tickets in their mother tongue, they are being harmed in the most discriminatory of manners. This goes beyond a basic democratic right to just being inherently illogical and prejudiced. Make no mistake, simply because an auto driver, a maid or a store employee knows his or her numbers, colors and a few other cursory words in English does not mean they truly speak it, let alone read it. Moreover, the academic conversation on this matter is controlled by those in the cities while the situation is much more dire in the towns, villages, hamlets and tribal regions.

Why English has become the language of the elite

There is an enormous range of nuanced reasons as to why English has become the language of the elite and of governance in India, even putting aside the original Macaulyism. It remains that Indians have come to believe that their nation’s prosperity, as well as their own, is wholly dependent upon not just learning English, but exclusively learning it as a first language. It began with the travelled elite, boomed within the middle class that was hired by multinational companies, and trickled to the vast majority hoping to escape their destitution but unable to afford private English education. Curiously, many states in India have attempted to make English the medium of instruction for all schools in an attempt to assuage the demands of the poor; however, the shortage of teachers who can even speak English is surreal. All of this while the vast majority is able to communicate in their respective mother tongues.

The most spoken languages in India, according to India’s census data, are Hindi (422m), Bengali (83m), Telugu (75m), Marathi (71m), Tamil (60m), Urdu (51m), Gujarati (46m), and Punjabi (29m). As such, the states in India are generally drawn on linguistic lines with each state having a history of literature, art, dance, politics and value system that is its own; being similar to the European Union in this regard. Take Andhra Pradesh and Telangana, for example, where Telugu is the local language: These two states combined have a larger population than France, South Korea and Turkey. However, unlike these nations, the language of the majority is falling into disarray because of strict English use with a prejudice due to governments and companies needlessly conducting intrastate business (with great difficulty) in English when they could reach far more people in the local language. While it is true that English is integral for communication between states, the Central Government and foreign companies, is it really necessary to use it within a state where most people have the same mother tongue? To be perfectly clear, no reasonable person could advocate that English should not be taught. In fact, it would be imprudent not to teach the modern lingua franca (or inglese if you so please) but there is no reason to believe that people could not be fluent if they learn it from their early years onwards as a second language. That is what is done in so many other nations like Sweden, Germany, Japan, Thailand, Greece, Finland, Italy, Egypt, and so forth.

Only about 30% can speak English

The statistics on English speaking ability tends to be unreliable for a host of political reasons, but it is generally accepted that somewhere in the range of 30% are able, to varying degrees, speak English—though only a third have some semblance of reading and writing aptitude. Still, it is unadorned disenfranchisement and an embarrassing plight for the other 70-80% of Indians. Contextually, this would mean anywhere from 770-900 million people are being oppressed on a daily basis. Even if one subtracts the 25-30% who are illiterate (another matter entirely), this is still about 577-630 million. For argument’s sake, let us say that this affects only 200 million people: this is still thrice the population of the U.K. Is this acceptable for a purportedly “socialist democracy?” Of the myriad of India’s social constructs this is possibly the simplest matter to amend and remedy.

To explore the matter at a more foundational level, all development begins with education, and education, of course, stems from language. Yet, language is much more than a means of communication; it determines the books one reads, the television programs one watches, the ideas one is exposed to, the values one holds, one’s personal interests, and one’s career opportunities. In essence, it defines our identities. Therefore, what is perhaps most damning is that because of this favoritism afforded to the English language the cultures of India are dying as they lose out on generations of authors, activists, actors, artists, playwrights, innovators, orators, and businesspersons who would have otherwise contributed to, and enriched, their own language.
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Old 26-10-2016, 11:19 PM   #3
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May be young tech-savvy Indians in Bangalore should be targetted? Since they may not be aware how their tech is contributing to the elites agenda?
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Old 27-10-2016, 01:36 AM   #4
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Imagine how the world would change if David started speaking in the sub-Continent!
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Unlike a lot of other people, David walks the talk. Be careful who you trust in this alternative media and research.

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Old 27-10-2016, 02:23 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by tildatod View Post
Not all Indians learn to speak English...
Yes , but anyone who knows of David work will speak English , and who would by a ticket unless they've already read a book of his?

There are 29 languages spoken there .. the most widely spoken, hindi is only spoken by 41%

I can't understand how this question of language arose. Guaranteed no translators are needed .
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Old 27-10-2016, 02:31 AM   #6
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way i see it is it dont matter how many talks DI gives it will not
change anything in india
the indians know very well theyre been fucked by govt etc
theyve accepted the fact dacades ago. its a fact of life, theres
corruption everywhere and they just live with it
what somebody says aint going to change a thing

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Old 27-10-2016, 02:38 AM   #7
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"Only about 30% can speak English"

Yeah, that's 30% of 1.252 BILLION people, which still comes out approx. 375 MILLION persons. That's more than enough to fill up a few arenas and stadiums. And I'm guessing a large percentage of them will be in the city centers of the aforementioned cities.
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Old 27-10-2016, 10:32 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by oz93666 View Post
Yes , but anyone who knows of David work will speak English , and who would by a ticket unless they've already read a book of his?

There are 29 languages spoken there .. the most widely spoken, hindi is only spoken by 41%

I can't understand how this question of language arose. Guaranteed no translators are needed .

Someone who buys a book, may not also be someone who can hear language and understand it as a fellow Isle of Wight person can. You're assuming that the skill of reading is the same as the skill of listening. You're assuming that written English is identical to the spoken indian english dialect.

I know you know everything Oz, and that you are our new lord and master here, and we must all believe the gibberish you post as fact, but DI and the indian population know better what they're dealing with.

Have some faith in DI's brain knowing more than you mighty king.
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Old 27-10-2016, 10:33 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fairdose View Post
"Only about 30% can speak English"

Yeah, that's 30% of 1.252 BILLION people, which still comes out approx. 375 MILLION persons. That's more than enough to fill up a few arenas and stadiums. And I'm guessing a large percentage of them will be in the city centers of the aforementioned cities.

And their english is very different to the Standard British English dialect. LOL! Have you ever been to a seminar or speech by someone with a very different accent, and who speaks a very different english dialect?
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Old 27-10-2016, 11:36 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by tildatod View Post
I know you know everything Oz, and that you are our new lord and master ....
Well thank you tild , very nice of you to say so ...

Yes I have visited India a few times ... I can't remember meeting anyone who didn't speak excellent English .

Those 70% who don't speak English are scattered in villages and are mostly farmers and the elderly , who don't have a broad knowledge of the world , and would not know who David is.
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Old 27-10-2016, 11:54 AM   #11
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If anyone's really interested in anything related to reality, then have a read. People who have no knowledge of the ins and outs of learning a second language seem to have convinced themselves that everyone who learns English has learned it to advanced level. LOL! I suppose it's because so few people in England can speak a second language that they live in ignorance of just how awkward and complex it is to exist in a world where you are having to speak a language that isn't your first language.

The four skills are mastered at different times and speeds/paces. A person can speak English much better than they can read it or write it. Most learners struggle with listening. We speak too fast, we use too many colloquialisms, we use slang, we use reduced forms, we trail off, start again, repeat ourselves. The person who has never learned a second language and had to use it in business or work, has NO awareness of just how hard the CPU/brain has to work to make sense of everything in real time. The same people who believe that they know what's happening in others' minds, are the same people who have never yet had to endure 11 hours listening to someone speaking in their second language. Everythign is easy when someone else is being made to do it.

I know that some are engraged by the fact that we cater to different languages, but it seems that even people in their home countries should give up their language and culture, and rather kowtow to the needs of those who have never worked and studied in a foreign language, least of all a language so large and complex as English.

Why don't we just eradicate ALL other languages? Let's just ban all languages globally and make everyone speak English. And we can also ban the existence of different English dialects. I'll ask the admins to delete the regional dialect words mentioned in my thread about words, shall I? Why are regional dialects in the UK allowed when we can rather standardise everything? Let's conform and be robots, let's dictate the needs for others, with zero knowledge about either acquiring a second language, or about the vast challenges of listening in a second language. If it was so easy, DI would be multi-lingual and the people who prescribe in ignorance for others, would be able to work, study and exist using a second language 24/7....

Instead of living in ignorance, go to any second language learning website or forum, and have a chat with english language learners. Listen, if you're capable of it, to their trials and troubles when they try to grasp what the fuck English speakers from a different country are saying....




http://www.headsupenglish.com/index....stening-skills

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But what makes listening so difficult?

Unfortunately, it's easier to ask the question than to answer it. A lot of research actually comes form native language development, as opposed to second language acquisition. But we can still apply many of the findings to ESL EFL learning. For example, spoken language contains colloquialisms and reduced forms like "donchya" for "don't you" in English. There are steps that a listener goes through too, such as receiving the information, breaking it down, and identifying its purpose. The listener's interest in the topic, the content, and any visual support (or lack of it) similarly affects listening. These points are universally true for any spoken language.

Spoken language has a number of characteristics that affects or blocks comprehension. Before going into detail, perhaps an example is needed. As teachers, we've all likely experienced the following: A student goes abroad for a week or two, only to come back and say, "I didn't understanding anything the people said!" It's discouraging, not only for the student because of all his hard work, but for us too. The problem illustrates aspects of language which, when spoken, hinder comprehension. What's more, these problems aren't always worked into the classroom. They don't get practiced, so the students find themselves unprepared.

Colloquialisms: These are one of the most easily identifiable characteristics. Learners who have primarily studied for tests find this particularly troublesome because they have only been exposed to textbook English; they haven't prepared for anything save what will be tested. But even students more comfortable applying the language beyond the confines of a textbook or classroom can't be taught every single colloquialism, as these differ from country to country, region to region, and even among different age groups.

Accent, intonation, inflection, and stress: All are readily identifiable trouble spots. Most teachers and students understand the importance of accent. Of course, unfamiliar accents can hinder comprehension. Maybe the student has been taught by an American, but then takes a trip to London. Or maybe his mother tongue so heavily affects his English pronunciation that the word he hears doesn't match up with the word in his head. Whatever the reason, problems with accent can set up the same hurdles like a new, unfamiliar word. The student might be able to infer the meaning and continue the conversation. However, he's just as likely to bring the conversation to a halt because he's unable to understand the meaning.

Inflection and stress are perhaps less obvious trouble spots, yet both play an important role in picking up the meaning of a sentence. Take something simple like, "My dad was eating dinner when the phone rang." If different words get stressed, then the meaning changes. Compare the following:

Example #1: My DAD was eating dinner when the phone rang.
Example #2: My dad was EATING dinner when the phone rang.

The first example focuses on the person. The second example focuses on the action. For the listener, stress helps predict the information that follows.

Inflection adds nuance to a sentence, or even changes its meaning. Take the following statement, "Your dad was eating dinner." If you raise the pitch of your voice towards the end of the sentence, as when asking a question, then you're confirming the information. In other words, a question is asked to check the meaning or information. There's the opposite too, such as turning a question into a statement through inflection. A conversation might look like the following:

A: My dad was eating dinner when the phone rang.
B: Wait a minute. Your DAD was eating dinner. (rising inflection)
A: Yeah, my DAD.
B: (interrupts) I thought he was still away on business.
A: No, he got back early. Anyway, he was EATING and...

Reduced Forms: Reduced forms cause problems as well, especially for lower-level ESL EFL students. Native speakers often string several words together. "Can't you" becomes "canchya" and "what are you" becomes "whachya." There are also contractions, such as "we're" and "he's." Yet even upper-level students might not fully understand a sentence if they miss part of a sound.

Fillers, Correction, and Repetition: In English, speakers often use fillers like "uh," "ummm," and "well." These serve as pauses and hesitations as the person thinks about what to next say. There are phrases which signal correction or clarification, such as "I mean," "kind of," "sort of," and "like." Then people also repeat information, redelivering previously presented ideas. All of these points together act can sound like static on a radio. In other words, they can obfuscate what would normally be an otherwise simple set of sentences.

Word or phrase clusters: These are yet one more aspect that makes listening difficult. Native speakers and adept second-language learners select and digest manageable clusters, or chunks, of words. These chunks are often broken up with conjunctions, prepositions, and the like, which then serve as markers. For example, look at the following sentence which, although a run-on, would sound quite natural when spoken:

Example: My dad was eating dinner when the phone rang, and was he furious because it was one of those telemarketers who always seem to call just as we're sitting down to dinner.

A listener might break this into six chunks that represent the key information:

Chunk #1: dad eating dinner
Chunk #2: the phone rang
Chunk #3: furious
Chunk #4: a telemarketer
Chunk #5: always call
Chunk #6: sitting down to dinner

The problem pops up when a student tries to retain too much information, such as all of the words of a sentence or even several sentences. He just gets overwhelmed by too much information, which he can't process and remember. As a result, he loses the thread of the conversation.

Content: Content plays a very significant role in listening comprehension. Without sufficient background knowledge on the topic, which may very well include specialized vocabulary, the listener won't be able to follow the conversation. Just think of the differences between a casual conversation with a friend, the type of English needed at a doctor's office, and a discussion on global warming, politics, or the economy.

Each of the above aspects works in conjunction to make listening difficult. As teachers, we must consider the problems and pitfalls that listeners face both inside and outside the classroom. We must design activities that provide real, relevant content that improve the awareness of and ability to deal with colloquialisms, accent, intonation, and the like.
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Old 27-10-2016, 12:39 PM   #12
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Someone did a very strange poll online about which English accent is hardest to understand. They listed countries which have english as a first language....and then added India to the list. Nuts! The Indian accent was the hardest to understand, what a surprise. However, look at the comments from Indians and other nationalities - they cannot make sense of the 'British' accent or the 'American' accent. The comments below are funny and insightful. Enjoy!

https://www.usingenglish.com/poll/680.html



Quote:
uaroma

I think british accent is more difficult to hear. I love the accent though.

Quote:

archid

I find, the British accent is the most difficult to understand. Mainly those who are from other places in England apart from London, difficult to understand while speaking.

Quote:
faouzi lazari

Actually,British English has lots of accents,thus to me the most complicated english accent ever is Irish one

Quote:
apg

I am a native of India. For me American accent is the most difficult to follow. They speak very fast and words are difficult to pick. Indian accent is very slow,unattractive but easily understandable.


Quote:
kiraat

I am from Nepal. I understand pretty much all accents but find some british people who pronounce less word in some cases. I also find some aussie speaking. Eg "good day mate" is pronounced as " goodai mite". Some might find Indian accent hard to understand because most of they use "nd" at the end of some words say for example "and" is pronounced as "anddu". American they say "blood" as "blad" , "economics " as "econahmics" . Chinese for "think" they say "sink". English is all about stress of sound. Western people say "danyabad" for "dhanyabaadh" because they don't speak from epiglotis very often. By the way the word "dhanyabaadh" is a word from Khas language which is marketed as Nepali which means "thank you"


Quote:
american guy

english is my second language and i mastered it completely almost forgetting the language i learned when i was a child. i find british english so hard to understand because some words are not announced with all the bells and whistles the words are suppose to have making it very difficult to decipher. i can't believe indian is the highest i i can understand them perfectly. listen to depak chopra his indian first i thought it was a british accent that i understood then i found out he was indian. maybe he is an indian with an understandable english accent from Britain i don't really know but i understand indian accents just fine. i say after british people it might be american accents i live in california and if i go some places in the USA i would have a difficult time understanding most people. thats how the USA i love it.

Quote:
Maruda

I am an Indian, so of course, I don't have difficulty understanding Indian accent. I don't know about other non-native English speakers, but I find all British accents very hard to understand. Also Chinese; I just can't say if they're trying to speak english or chinese.

Quote:
Amir Baseri

I find AmE accent a little bit to noisy if you believe! Well , it's full of r-r-r-r..! I am myself a Persian , learning BrE for 5 years and I just love the accent and also , I understand it much better.




Quote:
david

This kind of poll will be very subjective. I am indonesian. we understand better english which is more roundly pronounced. Russian is the easiest to understand to us, beside Indonesian English of course. Russian is very good at saying R sound. they can vibrate their tounge somehow perfectly like we Indonesian do. Oriental English like chinese and korean is the hardest to understand because they use no R. AARRR will be sounded AALLL by korean and chinese..


Quote:
kanishk

Good God!
Indian accent? Hard? Really? :/
Indian Accent is very easily understood rather. A very good example is 'Dr. Rajesh Koothrapalli' from the show 'The Big Bang Theory'
It's only his accent which is way too clear and might I say cuter than others'. Almost every Indian has that type of accent and I think it isn't hard to decipher it, not even in the slightest.
On the contrary, British accent is way too fast and unclear, consequently it's hard to pick up the words sometimes. The accent isn't difficult but understanding it, by others, obviously, is difficult. I am quite au fait with American accent now but still facing little difficulties to decipher all the intricacies of it, it's slangs, for instance. But its just because I am not a native American.


Quote:
Ritesh

You kidding me? India has got a billion indian accent varying from north to south to east.north indian accent is the coolest n easy to understand n South Indian is the worst.i think American is the coolest accent n British n australian is the worst of all.


Quote:
fred masafwa

.... My point of vew....
Hello, my name's Fred form DR Congo.
Sorry for those who voted for Indian English 'cause i got opportunity to work together with'em even if i'm an African but i was able to understand'em clearly. But both British and American it was a liltle bit difficult for me 'cause they are so fast and they always used breack words... that's why it makes their accent difficult to understand.


Quote:
Atanu

Actually I voted for British because there wasn't any option for all the British accents... there are a lot of different British accents and I had a hard time understanding a few ! But I find South Indian English accents really difficult... I am an Indian and I speak American accent and so its the easiest for me.

But I must admit that I love to listen to the British accent.. its really sweet.


Quote:
robin

I became surprised to see the poll result. Indian English accent is not tough to be. But British accent is really tough to understand. Because I think British peoples don't follow their own rule of pronunciation.
At the same time they don't make their accent easier or standard when they talk to foreigners. They think that, foreigners will understand their accent. !!!!!



Quote:
ed

I am Polish hence unbiased. Indian English is very easy for me to understand because they pronounce all the sounds clearly. I can't understand villagers and the riff-raff from Ireland and UK, they skip nearly all consonants and only use vowels. Also, they like inventing words or use some slang expressions which cannot be found in even the best dictionaries. Americans are easy to understand except for rednex hillbillies who don't open their mouths when speaking and all sounds go through their noses. This is very irritating and exhausting to listen to them.


Quote:

Ravi

I find this poll absolutely humbug for two following reasons:

1. Most of the countries are those that have English as native language, but since English isn't the native language of India, the idea of including India is starkly absurd. Had this list consisted countries as well where English isn't the native language such as China, Korea, Russia, Brazil anf so forth, this list would then have seemed reasonable.

2. India is a nation where more than 200 languages and dialects are spoken by more than 100 different ethnic group people, so how can there be a single accent? Majority of Indians living in aboard are South Indians whose accent is literally hard to grasp but it doesn't mean all Indians have that accent.


Quote:
Tong

I learned English as a second language for a long time, and i lived in NZ AUS and Uk for ard 1 year each. Seriously if ur honest to yourself UK must be the most difficult because they are so diverse and original in their own ways. Its not only about the sound. Whoever says Indian is more difficult is either from UK or just plain hypocritical. Impossible.


Quote:
Tom Patrick

I am native of Madurai.As far as i am concerned, U.K accent is really harder to understand, Because they speak too fast with their own accent, I keep on trying to understand it. I have no way to get rid of this.


Quote:
Lim Thean Leong

British English because itself is a native language


Quote:
ASK

I understand from most people Indian accent is the most difficult to understand but even in India we have numerous english accents and not one, native english speakers will be surprised to know this but we can determine the linguistic group of an Indian just by his english accent!! I guess same goes for Brits as well. Having stayed there if 2 Geordies or Scottish went talking among them I couldn't understand a word. Nice survey by the way

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Old 27-10-2016, 12:56 PM   #13
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Countries where English is spoken as a second, third or fourth language definitely need a translator. DI has the right idea. He'd be wasting his breath and time, and those people may waste their money and time attending a long seminar, which they only understand partially. I've attended his marathon talks and it's tiring to listen for that long, hence the frequent breaks. But it's still tiring.

Another unfortunate language learner struggling with one of our accents...

https://www.englishforums.com/Englis...dgxxv/post.htm


This is a must-read. Siri, the iPhone genie, has trouble understanding the user. Language learning, understanding and speaking is a really complex but funny subject.

Quote:
Help! Siri Can’t Understand My British Accent



...."Where can I get a decent pint?”

She seems to understand, repeating back to exactly what I just said. Finally! But then she ruins it by bringing up an answers.yahoo.com link titled, “Where can I get a decent paint brush from?”
http://www.bbcamerica.com/anglopheni...british-accent
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Old 27-10-2016, 04:01 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by fairdose View Post
Just listened to the Ritchie Allen show with Jaymie Icke and they mentioned possibly going to India and how getting translators is key.

Why would you guys need a translator for India? Everyone there already speaks English since its a Commonwealth country and most of the people who follow David's work there are Indians who already speak and understand English perfectly.?

Just a suggestion, but if you guys do make it to India, try to pencil in Kolkata (Calcutta) since that is the most intellectual city in India. The money is in Mumbai (Bombay), the elite are in Delhi and probably the most tech-savvy are in Bangalore. Those four cities also cover East, South, West and North of the country.?
All the main Indian newspapers are published in English the TV news plus many TV programmes are in English. On top of that anyone worth speaking to in India understands and speaks perfect English. Nor do you need a translator to communicate with anyone who has less than perfect English because, if they are interested in or need to know what you are saying THEY will have brought somebody along with them who can translate.

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Old 27-10-2016, 04:39 PM   #15
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Calm down tildatod. Seriously.

For the record, I'm Canadian and actually taught ESL for several years in Turkey among other teachers from the US, UK, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and you want to know something, the students preferred the Canadian accent because they said it was "softer and clearer and easier to understand".

I also happen to be of Indian/Bengali descent and can speak Hindi, Bangla and a teeny-tiny bit of Urdu and have gone back to the sub-continent many times. People who buy David's books, no doubt probably watch his many, many videos online, visit this site etc. In fact, it would be interesting to know from the webmasters how many visitors are coming to this site from the Indian sub-continent (meaning including Bangladesh, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal and Bhutan). If they understand his videos, they won't need an interpreter.

If the numbers are pretty high, I can almost guarantee that they all speak and understand English perfectly and should David decide go to India, he'll have an in-built audience there waiting for him, no interpreter needed.
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Old 27-10-2016, 08:57 PM   #16
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All the main Indian newspapers are published in English the TV news plus many TV programmes are in English. On top of that anyone worth speaking to in India understands and speaks perfect English. Nor do you need a translator to communicate with anyone who has less than perfect English because, if they are interested in or need to know what you are saying THEY will have brought somebody along with them who can translate.
I don't think you can take along your own personal translator to a DI talk, and have them whisper in your ear. 'Main' newspapers? I don't read any of the newspapers printed in England, what makes you think that people there are reading English ones?

Again, a newspaper is a written medium. Reading is a completely different skill to listening. Is this hard for people to understand?
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Old 27-10-2016, 08:59 PM   #17
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Calm down tildatod. Seriously.

For the record, I'm Canadian and actually taught ESL for several years in Turkey among other teachers from the US, UK, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and you want to know something, the students preferred the Canadian accent because they said it was "softer and clearer and easier to understand".

I also happen to be of Indian/Bengali descent and can speak Hindi, Bangla and a teeny-tiny bit of Urdu and have gone back to the sub-continent many times. People who buy David's books, no doubt probably watch his many, many videos online, visit this site etc. In fact, it would be interesting to know from the webmasters how many visitors are coming to this site from the Indian sub-continent (meaning including Bangladesh, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal and Bhutan). If they understand his videos, they won't need an interpreter.

If the numbers are pretty high, I can almost guarantee that they all speak and understand English perfectly and should David decide go to India, he'll have an in-built audience there waiting for him, no interpreter needed.
You calm down fairdose, seriously.

For the record I am Saudi-Jamaican-German-Australian-Timbuktu-Ethiopian and have taught ESL for the last 300 decades, and can tell you that your information is quite at odds with what Indians themselves think and are.

Hahahahahahahahahahaha when you say that people prefered the Canadian accent....in TURKEY. So now Turkey = India. All of India or just the place where DI is going to talk?

Seriously, get a grip.
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Old 27-10-2016, 09:02 PM   #18
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Hmm, so now all the Indians are watching DI videos too. Must be nice to have CCTV in every Indian home, and be able to equate Turkey to India.

BTW for an ESL teacher as you claim, you still equate reading a book or his forums with listening to him live? You do know that watchign a video means a learner can rewind and repeat the same sentence a thousand times, but they can't do that in real life with a real human?
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Old 27-10-2016, 09:17 PM   #19
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Everybody's an expert on Indian English these days, because apparently everything in India is WRITTEN in English. And alleged teachers of English are now trying to tell us that reading English is the same as listening to it. NO sane EFL or ESL teacher ever parallels books and reading with speech and listening

Maybe you all should read all the endless complaints which come from UK people about Indian call centres. Yeah, because Indian English is just SO similar and identical to Standard British English and DI's personal dialect and accent. We love us some Indian English, it's just like hearing the BBC 6 o' clock propaganda report. I've been imagining UK people's issues with Indian English, and likewise, Indians having difficulty with UK English speakers, accents and dialects.

Thank the universe that DI is well aware of the needs of foreign language speakers.
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Old 27-10-2016, 10:29 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by jikwan View Post
way i see it is it dont matter how many talks DI gives it will not
change anything in india
the indians know very well theyre been fucked by govt etc
theyve accepted the fact dacades ago. its a fact of life, theres
corruption everywhere and they just live with it
what somebody says aint going to change a thing
i don't agree with that man

the situation is fluid...things are changing all the time and the internet is bringing people together from around the world

if we are to beat a global conspiracy then we need to build global awareness and come together with ideas, solutions and support with people from around the world

Last edited by iamawaveofthesea; 27-10-2016 at 10:46 PM.
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