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Old 19-02-2016, 08:18 PM   #81
mananaan
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I was in the National Gallery this week, first time in years. 20 mins in and I had a headache and sore back. Ok it's half term week and mobbed, but still. And I remembered why I'd only ever gone once before. There's just so much crap! A few brilliant paintings but the rest is just padding. Vanity paintings commissioned by rich noblemen who wanted to outdo their neighbours...skillfully done because the artists trained for years, but no essence to speak of. They were the high end consumer items of their time.

In the end I found my way to the room with the Van Goghs and Cezannes and what a relief that was. Van Gogh is like a breath of fresh air, paintings so luminous and alive. That Sunflower someone posted earlier is quite stunning in real life. It must be underpainted in white, it's so bright. It really lifted my spirits. And I think that's one of the reasons we need art of all kinds. Some true artists have the ability to translate and express the higher essences of life, the universe, whatever you want to call it, and by looking at their paintings we can connect to the same thing and be uplifted by it. That's the real skill, I believe. It's a felt thing, and all these critics do is demean with their endless words.

One thing I really love are portraits. When the artist captures something of the person inside you can feel it and it draws you in repeatedly, it's undeniable. That's why that fker Churchill destroyed the amazing portrait Graham Sutherland did of him. Couldn't stand the truth.

But to answer the question - yes the Art World is elitist, but art itself isn't. And nowadays there is so much opportunity to sell work online the galleries are losing their grip. Why pay a gallery to show, then a commission for sales and come out with fk all when you can do it yourself direct?
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Old 19-02-2016, 08:20 PM   #82
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I am an artist, fairly successful, will never be phenomenal cuss I don't have an art degree or an agent who mixes with the right people, however I do know a few people who buy art as an investment ..... because it has a name..... not because it's a good piece of art...... if someone of influence said tomorrow my work was fantastic and you should all buy it cuss its a sound investment you would regardless of what it was ....... the old masters were not masters in their own life time and many of them died poor .... art is elitist and always had been
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Old 21-03-2016, 03:52 PM   #83
decode reality
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There's also a 'North/South' thing going on.

North of England 'at risk of becoming cultural wasteland' with museums hit by austerity measures

The Independent, 11 March 2016

Campaigners warn parts of the region are in danger of losing vital links to their unique heritage amid cuts

The North of England is in danger of becoming a cultural wasteland as town hall leaders, struggling to cope with George Osborne’s austerity measures, are forced to slash budgets for museums, heritage campaigners have warned.

More than 20 museums in the North and the Midlands have shut their doors since 2010 and more are now under threat of closure as local councils prepare to pull the plug on funding.

Five museums in Lancashire, including the Helmshore Mills Textile Museum – a last relic of the county’s once mighty cotton industry, are facing the axe as part of the council’s drive to cut £65m over two years.

Across the Pennines, several heritage sites in West Yorkshire are also under threat as Kirklees councillors seek to halve their £1m museums budget. In the North-east, the Durham Light Infantry Museum is earmarked to shut on 1 April as the county council faces cuts of more than £370m.

Campaigners say parts of the North are in danger of losing vital links to their unique culture and heritage.

The Chancellor promised last year to increase funding to Arts Council England and national museums and galleries – most of which are in London. But regional museums supported by local councils are struggling to survive.

“Many museums at the heart of British towns and cities are now at risk of closing as government cuts force local authorities to radically reduce spending on culture,” said Alistair Brown, policy officer at the Museums Association.

“Museums in the North of England appear to be first in the firing line and the Museums Association is concerned that whole areas may turn into cultural deserts as a result.”

John Orna-Ornstein, director of museums for Arts Council England, said: “We recognise that many local authorities are facing significant financial pressures and are having to make difficult decisions regarding their investment in art and culture.

“We cannot fill this gap in funding, but we are working in close partnership with many local authorities to find ways we can jointly support art and culture at a local level.”

A Local Government Association spokesman said: “Councils recognise the tremendous role museums play in helping to create places where people want to live, work and visit. However, local authorities have suffered significant funding reductions and have to make difficult decisions.”

The Treasury did not respond to a request for a comment.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk...-a6926321.html
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Old 27-03-2016, 06:04 PM   #84
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Here's one I came across recently. Beer tin art. All courtesy of Grolsch Lager. Art for the people, by the people, supped by the people:

http://www.canvas.grolsch.com

Over 18's only.

Last edited by cosmic tramp; 27-03-2016 at 06:05 PM.
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Old 27-03-2016, 06:23 PM   #85
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There is the Baltic in the NE of England.

I've been a couple of times and to be honest, it was mostly pretentious shite. With a lot of Geordies muttering "what the f**k is that, like."

The lifts are quite cool though.


The only exhibit that I enjoyed was on a theme of black people in the 50's. There was a pitch black room with a huge screen and a bench facing it. There was a black fella on the screen dressed in 50's clothes, whistling.

It was really hypnotic, also my feet were hurting and it was nice to sit down.

Last edited by Getagrip; 27-03-2016 at 06:27 PM.
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Old 27-03-2016, 07:12 PM   #86
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Originally Posted by Getagrip View Post
There is the Baltic in the NE of England.

I've been a couple of times and to be honest, it was mostly pretentious shite. With a lot of Geordies muttering "what the f**k is that, like."

The lifts are quite cool though.


The only exhibit that I enjoyed was on a theme of black people in the 50's. There was a pitch black room with a huge screen and a bench facing it. There was a black fella on the screen dressed in 50's clothes, whistling.

It was really hypnotic, also my feet were hurting and it was nice to sit down.
They were doing that sort of stuff in the Liverpool Dockside, another room with Marilyn Monroe perpetually blowing a kiss at you. Also, Oxford had something similar too where you're in a pitch black room, with screened off labyrinthine passageways, screens on different walls with allsorts going on in each : ceremonies, scenic stuff, sacrifices . You don't know which way to turn .One indeed becomes mis en scene within the dreamscape. One is indeed art oneself.

Last edited by cosmic tramp; 27-03-2016 at 07:13 PM.
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Old 14-05-2016, 02:33 PM   #87
decode reality
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Antiques Roadshow expert mistakenly values school art project at $50,000

Appraiser said ‘grotesque face jug’ was century-old and reminiscent of Picasso before it was found to be work of a 1970s high school student

An expert antiques appraiser who likened a high schooler’s art project to the work of Pablo Picasso and valued it at up to US$50,000 (£35,000) has chalked up the mistake to a learning experience.

In a recent episode of the American version of Antiques Roadshow filmed in Spokane, Washington, Alvin Barr from South Carolina presented for appraisal a glazed redware jug, more than 30cm tall and decorated with six faces.

Barr had found it at an estate sale in Eugene, Oregon, he said, “covered with dirt and straw … some chicken droppings”. Despite its unassuming appearance, he said he “had to have it”, and paid $300 for the item.

“It speaks to me,” he said. “It was saying: ‘I’m very unusual.’”

READ MORE AT:

http://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-ra...ol-art-project
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Old 14-05-2016, 03:07 PM   #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by decode reality View Post
Antiques Roadshow expert mistakenly values school art project at $50,000

Appraiser said ‘grotesque face jug’ was century-old and reminiscent of Picasso before it was found to be work of a 1970s high school student

An expert antiques appraiser who likened a high schooler’s art project to the work of Pablo Picasso and valued it at up to US$50,000 (£35,000) has chalked up the mistake to a learning experience.

In a recent episode of the American version of Antiques Roadshow filmed in Spokane, Washington, Alvin Barr from South Carolina presented for appraisal a glazed redware jug, more than 30cm tall and decorated with six faces.

Barr had found it at an estate sale in Eugene, Oregon, he said, “covered with dirt and straw … some chicken droppings”. Despite its unassuming appearance, he said he “had to have it”, and paid $300 for the item.

“It speaks to me,” he said. “It was saying: ‘I’m very unusual.’”

READ MORE AT:

http://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-ra...ol-art-project
That's crazy! So, the monetary value has nothing to do with it's artistic merit (good piece btw), it's just chalked up in years (an abstract). $3,000 - $5,000 for 40 years and $30,000 - $50,000 for a bit over 100 years. Abstract art, lol.
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Old 14-05-2016, 03:22 PM   #89
decode reality
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Originally Posted by white light View Post
That's crazy! So, the monetary value has nothing to do with it's artistic merit (good piece btw), it's just chalked up in years (an abstract). $3,000 - $5,000 for 40 years and $30,000 - $50,000 for a bit over 100 years. Abstract art, lol.
It really is the emperor's new clothes. In fact clothes in a tumble drier would probably make a "good" Tracy Emin installation. Rather than being set in a gallery, this 'installation' could take place at any good launderette.
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Old 14-05-2016, 03:32 PM   #90
white light
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Originally Posted by decode reality View Post
It really is the emperor's new clothes. In fact clothes in a tumble drier would probably make a "good" Tracy Emin installation. Rather than being set in a gallery, this 'installation' could take place at any good launderette.
I'd pay good moneys to see that. Get my washing done too.
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Old 14-05-2016, 03:36 PM   #91
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Originally Posted by decode reality View Post
There's also a 'North/South' thing going on.

North of England 'at risk of becoming cultural wasteland' with museums hit by austerity measures

The Independent, 11 March 2016

Campaigners warn parts of the region are in danger of losing vital links to their unique heritage amid cuts

The North of England is in danger of becoming a cultural wasteland as town hall leaders, struggling to cope with George Osborne’s austerity measures, are forced to slash budgets for museums, heritage campaigners have warned.

More than 20 museums in the North and the Midlands have shut their doors since 2010 and more are now under threat of closure as local councils prepare to pull the plug on funding.

Five museums in Lancashire, including the Helmshore Mills Textile Museum – a last relic of the county’s once mighty cotton industry, are facing the axe as part of the council’s drive to cut £65m over two years.

Across the Pennines, several heritage sites in West Yorkshire are also under threat as Kirklees councillors seek to halve their £1m museums budget. In the North-east, the Durham Light Infantry Museum is earmarked to shut on 1 April as the county council faces cuts of more than £370m.

Campaigners say parts of the North are in danger of losing vital links to their unique culture and heritage.

The Chancellor promised last year to increase funding to Arts Council England and national museums and galleries – most of which are in London. But regional museums supported by local councils are struggling to survive.

“Many museums at the heart of British towns and cities are now at risk of closing as government cuts force local authorities to radically reduce spending on culture,” said Alistair Brown, policy officer at the Museums Association.

“Museums in the North of England appear to be first in the firing line and the Museums Association is concerned that whole areas may turn into cultural deserts as a result.”

John Orna-Ornstein, director of museums for Arts Council England, said: “We recognise that many local authorities are facing significant financial pressures and are having to make difficult decisions regarding their investment in art and culture.

“We cannot fill this gap in funding, but we are working in close partnership with many local authorities to find ways we can jointly support art and culture at a local level.”

A Local Government Association spokesman said: “Councils recognise the tremendous role museums play in helping to create places where people want to live, work and visit. However, local authorities have suffered significant funding reductions and have to make difficult decisions.”

The Treasury did not respond to a request for a comment.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk...-a6926321.html
Lowry is shit IMO apart from the erotic etchings that they don't put on display.
That said the Lowry gallery and centre in Salford is a nice place to spend an evening.
Been to a couple of decent Opera North productions there.

Last edited by grandmasterp; 14-05-2016 at 03:36 PM.
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