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Old 22-03-2017, 01:43 PM   #21
the apprentice
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You could replace those plastic seed trays with cardboard egg boxes which can then be moved wholesale into the allotment where the roots will break through the rotting cardboard.

Put sum buckets with holes in over that Rhubarb and you can force it to Champagne quality (Yorkshire wit & wisdom).
Good idea with the egg boxes CT, we do have a few spare ones so we are going to plant some more soon cheers.

Just remembered, we still have about 40 bottles of pear cider left from last year, it's so strong now it nearly blows tha heed off.

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Old 24-03-2017, 11:38 AM   #22
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Another busy day in the garden area, preparing some ash spiles which are split into four, for making ash axles for the Amish wheelbarrows I make for use in our garden and for charity to use in neighbouring groups.

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The timber came from a local land owner for free and helping him clear a small row of trees so they can build a new barn on the land, he owns our privately run allotment next to the area where I was helping.

First the baulks of timber need cutting to length about a metre long then split into four sections to dry out ready for use this summer. Ash if cut before the end of March splits easily down the length using steel wedges that sit into small slots cut with the tip of the chainsaw.

It is these that I will work with a side axe later into the workable sections a foot long that will be turned to become the wheel axles later. The sun is shining this morning and Mr Robin came down almost at my feet looking for grubs that I have disturbed in the undergrowth, quite trusting little creatures and a wonderful sight in spring.

All in all its been a good mornings self pelf in exchange for an hour or two taking the trees down yesterday.

Synchronicity, reciprocation equals more freedom when your working with the right people.












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Thanks for looking.

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Old 27-03-2017, 05:07 PM   #23
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We are about half way through planting our seeds from our own seed bank and a few species from bought packets that we have still have to collect like cauliflowers, leeks and beetroot, other than that we have all our favorites in house.

Just put up the pea trainers which consist of eight canes inside a small wire mesh cage, with a plain 4.00mm plaint wire ring tied in at the top of the canest to give all round support and tie these to the next ring and so on. The mesh at the bottom helps the young plants get a good start and purchase then as they grow we add a string above the tops as they advance.

screenshot

We plant on the inside of the wires to prevent the pigeons from nipping all the tops off as the push through the soil. We plant the lower small climbing peas first straight into the soil first and bring the tall variety afterwards from pots we start in the greenhouse which begins budding just above the lower climbers, so it's pretty well full by the time everything is coming to harvest time.

We used Vancitiy's idea with the recycled egg boxes this season for starting our ancient Black Prince sweet peas which are a very dark purple and have the sweetest smell of all the varieties we have tried over the years.

A few more wigwams to erect tomorrow for the French and dwarf beans which also go behind cages to stop capt pigeon from feasting especially if they hatch a clutch right as we are planting out.










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The sweet peas we pricked out about two weeks ago are well through and have the lids removed now and will go in the open frame growing shelf to begin hardening off this week, which sits well up off of the ground to stop the frost nipping them off.

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Another picture of the area, notice how far on the grass has come, it's almost three inches long already due to the mild winter and will need a trim in this next week.

The overwintering leeks have doubled in size the last three weeks with a good inch girth already, but we will keep an eye out before they run to spike out and seed. The onion beds have also doubled in size and forming bulbs too.

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All the pellet fertilizer and compost has been pulled in with the worms already and you can push your hand into the soil up to the bottom joints, here is easy gardening aided by nature's unpaid servants.

Thanks for watching.

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Old 01-04-2017, 05:50 PM   #24
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Just in case you fall for their tricks.

We like our leeks here but after buying a packet of Unwins Stamfords, to our horror when we opened it we got only 18 seeds in the packet of 40, for £ 2.99 so we complained by email and relieved three national garden gift vouchers this morning.

Yet in the Kings seeds we got 500 seeds for £ 1.50 called winner.

The clear winner is Kings Seeds.






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Old 02-04-2017, 07:27 AM   #25
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I like Webs lettuce grown in an allotment ...get some in there!
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Old 02-04-2017, 07:35 AM   #26
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Are the seeds you use non GM?

GMO really bothers me. If I am to grow my own veg I would like to know that it's not going to poison me.

This company seems ok: http://www.realseeds.co.uk/GMOseed_is_a_scam.html
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Old 02-04-2017, 12:21 PM   #27
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I like Webs lettuce grown in an allotment ...get some in there!
We got some nearly read for potting on at the moment.

It's really hard to tell if all our seeds are heirloom today since gardeners have been crossing and breeding in certain traits, but we do collect our own seeds every year.

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Old 02-04-2017, 12:28 PM   #28
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Are the seeds you use non GM?

GMO really bothers me. If I am to grow my own veg I would like to know that it's not going to poison me.

This company seems ok: http://www.realseeds.co.uk/GMOseed_is_a_scam.html
I have read many different takes on this GMO magic model.

But as they monopolise the main cash crops the variety of different species often bred for their special tastes and not looks has plummeted by about 80%.

All we can do like the seed bank projects that have secured most of the ancient varieties is do the same, collect them now before they are all patented as they are doing daily.
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Old 02-04-2017, 05:27 PM   #29
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Can't seem to find your "Amazing things you have made thread", Apprentice, so I'll stick this link on here, are you aware of this site...should be right up your street...or garden path...or allotment...or...

http://www.vimeo.com/readymade

People who like to make their own stuff with vid demonstrations ; my Crowdsourcing book tells me subscription to Readymade magazine rose from 30,000 to 300,000 between 2001 and 2008.

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Old 02-04-2017, 05:41 PM   #30
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Another glorious evening in the garden and the sun is shining at the moment at 5.30 pm.

Today we planted our shallot sets out and about 200 plus onions which should be ready by the end of summer and collected before tying into French onion strings to last the winter through.

We also erected out sweet peach frame along the West side of the garden to give a little shade from the totally open area which gets a little too much evening sun; this will also help prevent the ground at this end of the garden from drying out too quickly in our very fine well draining river side silty black soil.










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The raspberry stand is well under way now, over the last two years we managed to harvest about a hundred pounds of fruit from this old breed variety.

The sweet pea plantlet's are nearly ready to plant out after hardening off in our top shelf greenhouse with its open front, the peas are an old strain called black night that we collected from someone who threw them in the communal compost are and have a very unique scent and almost blackish colour..

Thanks for looking.

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Old 05-04-2017, 04:30 PM   #31
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I couldn't resist this corny joke:

My uncle doesn't know much about plants. Once a neighbor was showing him through her greenhouse.
"This plant belongs to the Begonia family."
"Oh," gushed my uncle, "how nice of you to look after it for them!."
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Old 14-04-2017, 05:21 PM   #32
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The last few days have been cool and I had not ventured out for most of them, but today was quite nice so we decided to spend a full afternoon sticking.

We coppiced an ash tree that was shading out the back part of the garden where the late raspberry stand is situated. First we start cutting from the main but of the timber working back towards the very tips which make excellent fire sticks, we waste absolutely nothing, even the sawdust from the chainsaw is used for dettering the slugs when we scatter it around the base of our strawberry plants to keep them clean and above the soil.

The collection of French, Dwarf and Runner beans we planted about two weeks ago 8n the greenhouse are on their way now, and the first to try of sweet peas are now planted along their climbing fence. And the short climbing eating peas and another variety called Carling are through in the garden climbing rings show earlier.

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We sorted the branches of the ash into their different stem sizes and bagged about two months supply of fire lighting sticks.










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Old 14-04-2017, 06:36 PM   #33
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A few weeks ago I planted 27 autoflowering cannabis plants 8 different strains. And 12 regular cannabis seed home breed. I also have some tomqtoes like money maker and morgage lifter and a bunch of chiliplants like tabasco, Trinidad scorpion and a bunch of other ones. Different herbs like basil and oregano.
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Old 14-04-2017, 06:55 PM   #34
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Out of interest Mr Apprentice, do you use coffee grounds in any application ? Heard a feature on radio about a a UK company that collects up all the used coffee grounds from London cafe outlets - about 750kg a day, which are then sold on for mushroom mulching kits, apparently we only use 1% of the biomass of coffee in our drinking habits. All the gardeners' question time progs. saying that exploring compost potential of coffee grounds is still in it early stages, though it is enjoyed by acid loving plants like Roses, meant to be good slug deterrent too.

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Old 14-04-2017, 07:18 PM   #35
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A few weeks ago I planted 27 autoflowering cannabis plants 8 different strains. And 12 regular cannabis seed home breed.
I also have some tomqtoes like money maker and morgage lifter and a bunch of chiliplants like tabasco, Trinidad scorpion and a bunch of other ones. Different herbs like basil and oregano.
We are lacking a decent herb bed here but have a few medicinals like Sage, Comfrey, Sweet Ciciley, Angelica and a few ancients like Good King Henry, lovage and Anise. I'm into the Culpepper camp now for several years and have used some treatments successfully.
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Old 14-04-2017, 07:25 PM   #36
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Out of interest Mr Apprentice, do you use coffee grounds in any application ? Heard a feature on radio about a a UK company that collects up all the used coffee grounds from London cafe outlets - about 750kg a day, which are then sold on for mushroom mulching kits, apparently we only use 1% of the biomass of coffee in our drinking habits. All the gardeners' question time progs. saying that exploring compost potential of coffee grounds is still in it early stages, though it is enjoyed by acid loving plants like Roses, meant to be good slug deterrent too.
We have never tried the coffee model as we are not big coffee drinkers, but have tried the tea leaves trait, it makes good folia feed but still doesn't stop the urban commandos from nibbling.

We have been using copper tools for many years and this has definately had some effect, each time you cut dig or rake the soil it leaves behind tiny traces of copper.

The best effect for slugs is to carefully water your plants in and individually so as not to make it easy for the slugs to travel, by watering the whole garden surface.

The slugs really don't like nettle soup either, a bag full of leaves sunk into a barrel makes good folia feed but is very pungent indeed, needs to be watered down 20 to 1.
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Old 14-04-2017, 07:29 PM   #37
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We are lacking a decent herb bed here but have a few medicinals like Sage, Comfrey, Sweet Ciciley, Angelica and a few ancients like Good King Henry, lovage and Anise. I'm into the Culpepper camp now for several years and have used some treatments successfully.
That sound like a pretty nice mix. I am renting a house atm so I can or will not go overboard with the gardening, but this time next year I will own a house and then its planting time.
I heard good things about comfrey but I live in spain and I am not sure if its to hot for it there. Maybe just grow it in the winthef like I do pak choi and spinach. It should be great for kompost and the soil here deff need some mulching and some compost mixed in it so its something I will have to look into
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Old 14-04-2017, 07:37 PM   #38
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The slugs really don't like nettle soup either, a bag full of leaves sunk into a barrel makes good folia feed but is very pungent indeed, needs to be watered down 20 to 1.
I've actually made that gunk myself - stinks something foul - but it's like an ongoing Sunday dinner for plants isn't it ?
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Old 14-04-2017, 07:57 PM   #39
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I've actually made that gunk myself - stinks something foul - but it's like an ongoing Sunday dinner for plants isn't it ?
It's good stuff.

The first time I used it, my hand slipped into the water by mistake, it took days before I could wash the smell off.
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Old 14-04-2017, 08:05 PM   #40
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That sound like a pretty nice mix. I am renting a house atm so I can or will not go overboard with the gardening, but this time next year I will own a house and then its planting time.
I heard good things about comfrey but I live in spain and I am not sure if its to hot for it there. Maybe just grow it in the winter like I do pak choi and spinach. It should be great for kompost and the soil here deff need some mulching and some compost mixed in it so its something I will have to look into
We have the tall broad leaf variety which the bible bees really like, as soon as it flowers they are at it, we counted several hundred on it one day.

Comfrey is really good for a aching back, bruise the leaves and pour boiling water over them between two paper towels and once cool enough to touch place on the lower back, works wonders for me.

Ground elder grows around our outer path in profusion and also makes superb compost if you cut it regularly before it flowers, really good.
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