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Old 10-01-2011, 01:20 AM   #21
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Very cool thread, Mountain. It makes me wonder where the ideas of these creatures came from? Some may be inspired by star constellations. Others seem a bit less easily explained... I'd like to add a little contribution.
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The Pukwudgies have haunted the forests of Massachusetts since before the first European Settlers ever thought about setting out for a new land. For centuries they tormented the local Native Americans and crept their way into their creation myths and oral history. They could easily be passed of as legend, and in fact, their physical description is much like mythological creatures from other cultures in other times. The difference is these demons jumped from the page and evolved as the people around them changed, changing from reluctant helpers to evil tormentors. The difference is these demons are still seen by people today.

I only quoted a small portion of the website, so here's the link to the full article if anyone is interested.

http://www.masscrossroads.com/pukwudgies.html
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Old 10-01-2011, 01:32 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by 211200 View Post
Theseus and the Minotaur



Thanks for contributing Please post more
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Old 10-01-2011, 01:33 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by torus View Post
YES - The Calling

Feel the calling of a miracle
In the presence of the word.
Now we hold the right to rearrange
How the stories can be heard.

In the beginning is the future,
And the future is at hand;
I'll be calling voices of Africa
Be the rhythm to the plan.

From the Congo to Lenasia
Be the writing on the wall.
I'll be calling the colors of India
See the Asian life explode.

Head in to the headlight.
Don't turn from the rain.
There's a fire raging somewhere near,
Like a longtime friend who's
Seen it darker than ebony.
Take off on the turnpike
(Asking for the first call)
Give me more of the same
(Asking for a song)
There's a fire burning in my heart again.

I'll be calling the dragons of China;
See the dancers of the Nile.
See the wings of change are on display
This revelation mine.

Feel the calling of a miracle
In the presence of the word.

Head in to the headlight.
Don't turn from the rain.
There's a fire raging somewhere near,
Like a longtime friend who's
Seen it darker than ebony.
Take off on the turnpike
(Asking for the first call)
Give me more of the same
(Asking for a song)
There's a fire burning in my heart again.

Feel the calling of a miracle,
The revelation mine.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FwajU...xp_rn-1r-14-HM
Excellent! Thank you, Torus
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Old 10-01-2011, 01:38 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by mrindigo View Post
Very cool thread, Mountain. It makes me wonder where the ideas of these creatures came from? Some may be inspired by star constellations. Others seem a bit less easily explained... I'd like to add a little contribution.


I only quoted a small portion of the website, so here's the link to the full article if anyone is interested.

http://www.masscrossroads.com/pukwudgies.html
Thank you, Mr. I OoooOOooo chilly willies ..

I wonder the same! Star constellations, vivid imaginations? I am not sure. I am beginning to think there may be some truth in them and if so, the world was indeed interesting in olden times.
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Old 10-01-2011, 01:40 AM   #25
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5 stars mountain! thank you for bumping the crypto section with awesomeness
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Old 10-01-2011, 10:33 AM   #26
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The Lambton Worm is a legend from the Southern part of the North East of England in the UK. The story is one of the area's most famous pieces of folklore, having been adapted from written and oral tradition into pantomime and song formats.
The story revolves around John Lambton, a heir of the Lambton Estate, County Durham, and his battle with a giant worm (dragon) which had been terrorising the local villages. As with most myths, details of the story change with each telling.
Origin of the worm
The story states that the young John Lambton was a rebellious character who missed church one Sunday to go fishing in the River Wear. In many versions of the story, while walking to the river, or setting up his equipment, John receives warnings from an old man that no good can come from missing church.
John Lambton does not catch anything until the time the church service finishes, at which point he fishes out a small eel- or lamprey-like creature with nine holes on each side of its salamander-like head. Depending on the version of the story the worm is no bigger than a thumb, or about 3 feet long. In some renditions it has legs, while in others it is said to more closely resemble a snake.
At this point the old man returns, although in some versions it is a different character. John declares that he has caught the devil and decides to dispose of his catch by discarding it down a nearby well. The old man then issues further warnings about the nature of the beast.
John then forgets about the creature and eventually grows up. As a penance for his rebellious early years he joins the crusades.
The worm's wrath


Worm Hill, Fatfield, Washington.
Eventually the worm grows extremely large and the well becomes poisonous. The villagers start to notice livestock going missing and discover that the fully-grown worm has emerged from the well and coiled itself around a local hill.
In some versions of the story the hill is Penshaw Hill, that on which the Penshaw Monument now stands, but locally the credit goes to the nearby Worm Hill, in Fatfield. In most versions of the story the worm is large enough to wrap itself around Penshaw Hill 7 times. It is said that one can still see the marks of the worm on Worm Hill.
The worm terrorises the nearby villages, eating sheep, preventing cows from producing milk and snatching away small children. It then heads towards Lambton Castle where the Lord (John Lambton's aged father) manages to sedate the creature in what becomes a daily ritual of offering the worm milk of nine good cows, twenty gallons, or a filled wooden/stone trough.
A number of brave villagers try to kill the beast but are quickly dispatched. When a chunk is cut off the worm it simply reattaches the missing piece. Visiting knights also try to assault the beast but none survive. When annoyed the worm would uproot trees by coiling its tail around them. It then created devastation by waving around the uprooted trees like a club.
The vanquishing of the worm
After seven years John Lambton returns from the crusade to find his father's estates almost destitute because of the worm. John decides to fight it but first seeks the guidance of a wise woman or witch near Durham.
The witch hardens John's resolve to kill the beast by explaining his responsibility for the worm. She tells him to cover his armour in spearheads and fight the worm in the River Wear, where it now spends its days wrapped around a great rock. The witch also tells John that after killing the worm he must then kill the first living thing he sees, or else his family will be cursed for nine generations and will not die in their beds.
John prepares his armour according to the witch's instructions and arranges with his father that when he has killed the worm he will sound his hunting horn three times. On this signal his father is to release his favourite hound so that it will run to John, who can then kill the dog and thus avoid the curse.
John Lambton then fights the worm by the river. The worm tries to crush him, wrapping him in its coils, but it cuts itself on his armour's spikes. As pieces of the worm are chopped off they are washed away by the river, preventing the worm from healing itself. Eventually the worm is dead and John sounds his hunting horn three times.
The Lambton curse
Unfortunately, John's father is so excited that the beast is dead that he forgets to release the hound and rushes out to congratulate his son. John cannot bear to kill his father and so, after they meet, the hound is released and dutifully dispatched. But it is too late and nine generations of Lambtons are cursed so they shall not die peacefully in their beds.
This curse seems to have held true for at least three generations, possibly helping to contribute to the popularity of the story.
1st generation: Robert Lambton, drowned at Newrig.
2nd: Sir William Lambton, a Colonel of Foot, killed at Marston Moor.
3rd: William Lambton, died in battle at Wakefield.
9th: Henry Lambton, died in his carriage crossing Lambton Bridge on June 26, 1761.
(General Lambton, Henry Lambton's brother, is said to have kept a horse whip by his bedside to ward off violent assaults. He died in his bed at an old age.)












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Old 10-01-2011, 04:31 PM   #27
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The Thunderbird

The Thunderbird is argued to be either a giant bird or a pterodactyl, and there are many different accounts of giant birds that I think could be related to the Thunderbird legend.

The story of two indian boys climbing the thunderbirds mountain to view it, which was taboo - and upon reaching the top one of the boys stood back and watched his friend turn the corner on the cliff. He heard a crack of thunder, saw some lightning and then saw his friend fall off the cliff into the clouds below.







There are so many giant bird myths around the world that, like other reoccurring themes (lake monsters, sea monsters, wildmen/bigfeet) I would have to assume there were in fact giant birds seen in ancient times as well as today.

Monsterquest has done some coverage of the topic, they interviewed a man who as a boy was picked up in his backyard by a giant bird. His mother watched as the bird dropped the boy about 15 feet and then landed on the top of a tree.

There was also an account of a man who saw a bird on top of a telephone poll the size of a car.
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Old 10-01-2011, 05:16 PM   #28
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Giants / Titans





The Titans of Greek Mythology were born of the Earth, one of the Titans (Cronos) gave birth to the God Zeus and failed to eat him along with the rest of his children. Zeus lead an uprising against his father and the rest is history, the Titans were locked away in the Earth.

I like the idea of elemental giants. Not just giant humanoids but beings made of earth, stone, wood, etc. Walking mountains.
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Old 11-01-2011, 07:33 AM   #29
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This thread got some really old school posters Very nice as Borat would say!

Metacomet, where you been?
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Old 11-01-2011, 11:22 AM   #30
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Default Kinnari - Bird and Horse People



In Burma (Myanmar), kinnara are called keinnaya or kinnaya (ကိန္နရာ, [kèiɴnəjà]). Female kinnara are called keinnayi or kinnayi (ကိန္နရီ, [kèiɴnəjì]). In Shan, they are ၵိင်ႇၼရႃႇ (IPA: [kìŋ kǎ ràː]) and ၵိင်ႇၼရီႇ (IPA: [kìŋ nǎ rì]) respectively. Burmese Buddhists believe that out of the 136 past animal lives of Buddha, four were Kinnara. The kinnari is also one of the 108 symbols on the footprint of Buddha. In Burmese art, kinnari are depicted with covered breasts. The Myanmar Academy Awards statue for Academy Award winners is of a kinnari.[2] The kinnara and kinnari couple is considered the symbol of the Karenni people.[3]


Cambodia

In Cambodia, the Kinnari and Kinnara are known as Kennorey (Khmer: កន្នរី)and Kennara​(Khmer: កន្នរា). The Kennorey is depicted in arts and literature more often than its male counterpart, the Kennar. The function of Kennorey is mostly the same as that of its Thai counterpart; it is used in temple decorations and is a symbol for beauty and grace; but although very similar, the Kennorey has been used in arts since the Angkor period, and has less of a symbolic meaning than the Apsara.
There also once a famous which also concludes in Royal Ballet of Cambodia in title of Robam Kennorey.


India

Kinnaras are one of the exotic tribes of Ancient India mentioned along with Devas (including Rudras, Maruts, Vasus and Adityas), Asuras (including Daityas, Danavas and Kalakeyas), Pisachas, Gandharvas, Kimpurushas, Vanaras, Suparnas, Rakshasas, Bhutas and Yakshas. They along with others, were inhabitants of the Himalaya mountains. The people of the Gangetic Plain looked upon them with wonder and considered them as super-human.
Kinnaras were mysteriously linked with horses. Puranas mention them as horse-headed beings. Puranas mention about an Asura with a horse head, who was known as Hayagreeva (which in Sanskrit means the horse headed one; Haya = horse and greeva = head) This Asura was killed by an incarnation of Lord Vishnu, who took the similar form of a horse-headed human figure.
The epic Mahabharata mentions Kinnaras, not as horse-headed beings but as beings who were half-man and half-horse i.e. like a Centaur. Mahabharata and the Puranas describe regions north to Himalayas as the abode of Kinnaras. Another reference in the epic considers them as a sub-group of Gandharvas.


Indonesia

Kinnara (male), Kinnari (female), Apsara, and Devata guarding Kalpataru, the divine tree of life. 8th century Pawon temple, Java, Indonesia.
The images of coupled Kinnara and Kinnari can be found in Borobudur, Mendut, Pawon, Sewu, Sari, and Prambanan temples. Usually, they are depicted as birds with human heads, or humans with lower limbs of birds. The pair of Kinnara and Kinnari usually is depicted guarding Kalpataru, the tree of life, and sometimes guarding a jar of treasure. A pair of Kinnara-Kinnari bas-reliefs of Sari temple is unique, depicting Kinnara as celestial humans with birds' wings attached to their backs, very similar to popular image of angels.
There are bas-relief in Borobudur depicting the story of the famous kinnari, Manohara.


Thailand

Sculpture of a kinnari which was decorated in the royal crematorium of Princess Galyani Vadhana at Sanam Luang, Bangkok, Thailand (2008).
The Kinnari, (usually spelt 'Kinnaree' as noted below) (Thai: กินรี) in Thai literature originates from India, but was modified to fit in with the Thai way of thinking. The Thai Kinnari is depicted as a young woman wearing an angel-like costume. The lower part of the body is similar to a bird, and should enable her to fly between the human and the mystical worlds.


Statue of a kinnara in Wat Phra Kaew, Bangkok (Thailand).

The most famous Kinnari in Thailand is the figure known as Manora (derived from Manohara) in a Thai tome entitled Panyasa Chadok. Part of this literature is a dance called Manorah Buchayan, which is one of the most esoteric among the high classical dances of Thailand.
Thai Airways International publishes a monthly magazine with the title Kinnaree.

The male counterpart of the female Kinnari is a Kinnon (Thai: กินนร).


Tibet

In Tibet the Kinnara is known as the 'shang-shang' (Tibetan: ཤང་ཤང; Wylie: shang shang) (Sanskrit: civacivaka). This chimera is depicted either with just the head or including the whole torso of a human including the arms with the lower body as that of a winged bird. In Nyingma Mantrayana traditions of Mahayoga Buddhadharma, the shang-shang symbolizes 'enlightened activity' (Wylie: phrin las). The shang-shang is a celestial musician and is often iconographically depicted with cymbals. A homonymic play on words ia evident which is a marker of oral lore: the 'shang' (Tibetan: གཆང; Wylie: gchang) is a cymbal or gong like ritual instrument in the indigenous traditions of the Himalaya. The shang-shang is sometimes depicted as the king of the Garuda.





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Old 11-01-2011, 11:31 AM   #31
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Thanks 211200 and Metacomet! Much appreciated and many blessings

Here are a few more Thunderbirds ..







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Old 11-01-2011, 01:13 PM   #32
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A phoenix is a mythical bird that is a fire spirit with a colorful plumage and a tail of gold and scarlet (or purple, blue, and green according to some legends). It has a 500 to 1000 year life-cycle, near the end of which it builds itself a nest of twigs that then ignites; both nest and bird burn fiercely and are reduced to ashes, from which a new, young phoenix or phoenix egg arises, reborn anew to live again. The new phoenix is destined to live as long as its old self. In some stories, the new phoenix embalms the ashes of its old self in an egg made of myrrh and deposits it in the Egyptian city of Heliopolis (literally "sun-city" in Greek). It is said that the bird's cry is that of a beautiful song. The Phoenix's ability to be reborn from its own ashes implies that it is immortal, though in some stories the new Phoenix is merely the offspring of the older one. In very few stories they are able to change into people.




Most beings spring from other individuals; but there is a certain kind which reproduces itself. The Assyrians call it the Phoenix. It does not live on fruit or flowers, but on frankincense and odoriferous gums. When it has lived five hundred years, it builds itself a nest in the branches of an oak, or on the top of a palm tree. In this it collects cinnamon, and spikenard, and myrrh, and of these materials builds a pile on which it deposits itself, and dying, breathes out its last breath amidst odors. From the body of the parent bird, a young Phoenix issues forth, destined to live as long a life as its predecessor. When this has grown up and gained sufficient strength, it lifts its nest from the tree (its own cradle and its parent's sepulchre), and carries it to the city of Heliopolis in Egypt, and deposits it in the temple of the Sun.


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Old 11-01-2011, 02:13 PM   #33
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Great thread. I found the NAGA part especially interesting. David Icke has put his finger on something with his Reptilian theory. If you research it, nearly every ancient culture has a legend of the serpent people. Not just that they existed but that modern man EVOLVED from the `Nagas'.

The Greeks for example believed that the half man half serpent Cecrops taught them writing and agriculture, IOW civilization. Cecrops, along with another `Naga' Erechthonius founded Athens. For generations the Athenians called themselves Cecropidae in honor of the `Reptilian' king, Cecrops.

http://www.theoi.com/Heros/Kekrops.html
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Old 11-01-2011, 03:00 PM   #34
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5 stars mountain! thank you for bumping the crypto section with awesomeness
Thank you, Biblegirl I really appreciate that!

Hope to see you posting some stuff here!
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Old 11-01-2011, 03:09 PM   #35
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Great thread. I found the NAGA part especially interesting. David Icke has put his finger on something with his Reptilian theory. If you research it, nearly every ancient culture has a legend of the serpent people. Not just that they existed but that modern man EVOLVED from the `Nagas'.

The Greeks for example believed that the half man half serpent Cecrops taught them writing and agriculture, IOW civilization. Cecrops, along with another `Naga' Erechthonius founded Athens. For generations the Athenians called themselves Cecropidae in honor of the `Reptilian' king, Cecrops.

http://www.theoi.com/Heros/Kekrops.html
Thanks

I am particularly interested in nagas myself (its obvious I guess ) and I agree that Icke touched on that very well in his Children of the Matrix book especially.

He also mentions how many Native tribes are named after serpent ancestors and often translate to 'People of the Serpent' and 'People of the Snake'. I have not looked much into that to offer my own opinion on that, but I shall sometime soon when I have time. I shall be looking into that Cecrops character sometime as well.
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Old 13-01-2011, 05:08 AM   #36
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A phoenix is a mythical bird that is a fire spirit with a colorful plumage and a tail of gold and scarlet (or purple, blue, and green according to some legends). It has a 500 to 1000 year life-cycle, near the end of which it builds itself a nest of twigs that then ignites; both nest and bird burn fiercely and are reduced to ashes, from which a new, young phoenix or phoenix egg arises, reborn anew to live again. The new phoenix is destined to live as long as its old self. In some stories, the new phoenix embalms the ashes of its old self in an egg made of myrrh and deposits it in the Egyptian city of Heliopolis (literally "sun-city" in Greek). It is said that the bird's cry is that of a beautiful song. The Phoenix's ability to be reborn from its own ashes implies that it is immortal, though in some stories the new Phoenix is merely the offspring of the older one. In very few stories they are able to change into people.




Most beings spring from other individuals; but there is a certain kind which reproduces itself. The Assyrians call it the Phoenix. It does not live on fruit or flowers, but on frankincense and odoriferous gums. When it has lived five hundred years, it builds itself a nest in the branches of an oak, or on the top of a palm tree. In this it collects cinnamon, and spikenard, and myrrh, and of these materials builds a pile on which it deposits itself, and dying, breathes out its last breath amidst odors. From the body of the parent bird, a young Phoenix issues forth, destined to live as long a life as its predecessor. When this has grown up and gained sufficient strength, it lifts its nest from the tree (its own cradle and its parent's sepulchre), and carries it to the city of Heliopolis in Egypt, and deposits it in the temple of the Sun.


Thanks for posting this, you beat me to it

Here are a few blue phoenix ..





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Old 13-01-2011, 08:07 AM   #37
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amazing thread
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Old 14-01-2011, 02:52 PM   #38
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Default Wendigo aka Keewaqu or Kiwakwa

Wendigo is a mythical creature appearing in the mythology of the Algonquian people. It is a malevolent cannibalistic spirit into which humans could transform, or which could possess humans. Those who indulged in cannibalism were at particular risk, and the legend appears to have reinforced this practice as taboo. Wendigos were alien like embodiments of gluttony, greed, and excess; never satisfied after killing and consuming one person, they were constantly searching for new victims. In some traditions, humans who became overpowered by greed could turn into Wendigos; the Wendigo myth thus served as a method of encouraging cooperation and moderation.

http://www.smashinglists.com/30-famo...oid-creatures/



The Wendigo (also known as Windigo, Weendigo, Windago, Windiga, Witiko, Wihtikow, and numerous other variants)[1] is a mythical creature appearing in the mythology of the Algonquian people. It is a malevolent cannibalistic spirit into which humans could transform, or which could possess humans. Those who indulged in cannibalism were at particular risk,[2] and the legend appears to have reinforced this practice as taboo.

The Wendigo is also the state mythical creature for Wisconsin.
Wendigo psychosis is a culture-bound disorder which involves an intense craving for human flesh and the fear that one will turn into a cannibal. This once occurred frequently among Algonquian Native cultures, though has declined with the Native American urbanization.[3]

Recently the Wendigo has also become a horror entity of contemporary literature and film, much like the vampire, werewolf, or zombie, although these fictional depictions often bear little resemblance to the original entity.






In Algonquian mythology

The Wendigo is part of the traditional belief systems of various Algonquian-speaking tribes in the northern United States and Canada, most notably the Ojibwa/Saulteaux, the Cree, and the Innu/Naskapi/Montagnais.[4] Though descriptions varied somewhat, common to all these cultures was the conception of Wendigos as malevolent, cannibalistic, supernatural beings (manitous) of great spiritual power.[5] They were strongly associated with the Winter, the North, and coldness, as well as with famine and starvation.[6] Basil Johnston, an Ojibwa teacher and scholar from Ontario, gives one description of how Wendigos were viewed:[7]

“ The Wendigo was gaunt to the point of emaciation, its desiccated skin pulled tautly over its bones. With its bones pushing out against its skin, its complexion the ash gray of death, and its eyes pushed back deep into their sockets, the Wendigo looked like a gaunt skeleton recently disinterred from the grave. What lips it had were tattered and bloody [....] Unclean and suffering from suppurations of the flesh, the Wendigo gave off a strange and eerie odour of decay and decomposition, of death and corruption. ”
At the same time, Wendigos were embodiments of gluttony, greed, and excess; never satisfied after killing and consuming one person, they were constantly searching for new victims. In some traditions, humans who became overpowered by greed could turn into Wendigos; the Wendigo myth thus served as a method of encouraging cooperation and moderation.[8]

Among the Ojibwa, Eastern Cree, Westmain Swampy Cree, and Innu/Naskapi/Montagnais, Wendigos were said to be giants, many times larger than human beings (a characteristic absent from the Wendigo myth in the other Algonquian cultures).[9] Whenever a Wendigo ate another person, it would grow larger, in proportion to the meal it had just eaten, so that it could never be full.[10] Wendigos were therefore simultaneously constantly gorging themselves and emaciated from starvation.



Human Wendigos

All cultures in which the Wendigo myth appeared shared the belief that human beings could turn into Wendigos if they ever resorted to cannibalism[2] or, alternately, become possessed by the demonic spirit of a Wendigo, often in a dream. Once transformed, a person would become violent and obsessed with eating human flesh. The most frequent cause of transformation into a Wendigo was if a person had resorted to cannibalism, consuming the body of another human in order to keep from starving to death during a time of extreme hardship or famine.[11]

Among northern Algonquian cultures, cannibalism, even to save one's own life, was viewed as a serious taboo; the proper response to famine was suicide or resignation to death.[12] On one level, the Wendigo myth thus worked as a deterrent and a warning against resorting to cannibalism; those who did would become Wendigo monsters themselves.



Wendigo ceremony

Among the Assiniboine, the Cree and the Ojibwa, a satirical ceremonial dance was originally performed during times of famine to reinforce the seriousness of the Wendigo taboo. The ceremonial dance, known as a wiindigookaanzhimowin in Ojibwe and today performed as part of the last day activities of the Sun dance, involves wearing a mask and dancing about the drum backwards.[13] The last known Wendigo Ceremony conducted in the United States was at Lake Windigo of Star Island of Cass Lake, located within the Leech Lake Indian Reservation in northern Minnesota.[14]


Wendigo psychosis

The term "Wendigo psychosis" (also spelled many other ways, including "Windigo psychosis" and "Witiko psychosis") refers to a condition in which sufferers developed an insatiable desire to eat human flesh even when other food sources were readily available,[15] often as a result of prior famine cannibalism;[16] Wendigo psychosis is identified by Western psychologists as a culture-bound syndrome, though members of the aboriginal communities in which it existed believed cases literally involved individuals turning into Wendigos. Such individuals generally recognized these symptoms as meaning that they were turning into Wendigos, and often requested to be executed before they could harm others.[17] The most common response when someone began suffering from Wendigo psychosis was curing attempts by traditional native healers or Western doctors. In the unusual cases when these attempts failed, and the Wendigo began either to threaten those around them or to act violently or anti-socially, they were then generally executed.[18] Cases of Wendigo psychosis, though real, were relatively rare, and it was even rarer for them to actually culminate in the execution of the sufferer.[18]

One of the more famous cases of Wendigo psychosis involved a Plains Cree trapper from Alberta, named Swift Runner.[19][20] During the winter of 1878, Swift Runner and his family were starving, and his eldest son died. Twenty-five miles away from emergency food supplies at a Hudson's Bay Company post, Swift Runner butchered and ate his wife and five remaining children.[21] Given that he resorted to cannibalism so near to food supplies, and that he killed and consumed the remains of all those present, it was revealed that Swift Runner's was not a case of pure cannibalism as a last resort to avoid starvation, but rather of a man suffering from Wendigo psychosis.[21] He eventually confessed and was executed by authorities at Fort Saskatchewan.[22] Another well-known case involving Wendigo psychosis was that of Jack Fiddler, an Oji-Cree chief and shaman known for his powers at defeating Wendigos. In some cases this entailed euthanizing people suffering from Wendigo psychosis; as a result, in 1907, Fiddler and his brother Joseph were arrested by the Canadian authorities for murder. Jack committed suicide, but Joseph was tried and sentenced to life in prison, he was granted a pardon, but died three days after in jail, without knowing about it.[23]

Fascination with Wendigo psychosis among Western ethnographers, psychologists, and anthropologists led to a hotly debated controversy in the 1980s over the historicity of this phenomenon. Some researchers argued that Wendigo psychosis was essentially a fabrication, the result of naïve anthropologists taking stories related to them at face value.[24] Others, however, pointed to a number of credible eyewitness accounts, both by Algonquians and by Westerners, as proof that Wendigo psychosis was a factual historical phenomenon.[25]

The frequency of Wendigo psychosis cases decreased sharply in the 20th century as boreal Algonquian people came in to greater and greater contact with Western ideologies and more sedentary, less rural lifestyles.[3] While there is substantive evidence to suggest that Wendigo psychosis did exist, a number of questions concerning the condition remain unanswered.




References in popular culture

While Wendigos have been referred to in literature for many decades (most notably in Algernon Blackwood's 1910 story "The Wendigo," which introduced the legend to horror fiction,[26] and in Stephen King's novel Pet Sematary[27]), recently they have become something of a stock character in horror and fantasy films and television, along the lines of werewolves and vampires, usually bearing very little resemblance to the Algonquian spirit. Appearances include the movies Wendigo,[28] and Ravenous, and in episodes of the television series Charmed,[29] Supernatural,[30] Blood Ties,[31] and others. They also appear as characters in a number of computer and video games, including Final Fantasy,[32] The Legend of Dragoon,[33] and the Warcraft Universe,[34] as well as role-playing games such as Dungeons & Dragons.[35] Additionally, there is a Marvel Comics character known as "Wendigo". Native American singer-songwriter Buffy Sainte-Marie's song "The Priests Of The Golden Bull" asserts that the "money junkies" of the world are Wendigos.[36]


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Old 14-01-2011, 03:05 PM   #39
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Old 14-01-2011, 03:16 PM   #40
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