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Old 29-10-2016, 03:34 PM   #1
st jimmy
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Default Big Brother knows everything – GSM

Most people must have seen movies or series were a police informer spies on some “bad” criminals, by wearing a “wiretap”. You must have realised that a mobile phone contains everything needed to pick up what is said?
Do you have any idea how somebody can call you on your phone, if they don’t know what the nearest GSM-antenna is?
I have never understood that people do not mind being spied upon. If for example the Nazis wouldn’t have known who the Jews were, they couldn’t have deported them to the concentration camps.
One of the main reasons Big Brother wants to know what’s going on, is to verify that the brainwashing of the slaves is working (and how it needs to be adjusted).

GSM 134 EURO – OLD PHONE 491 EURO
You could look at it financially: as a rule of thumb old technology is cheaper than new.
If I want my (old) house telephone connected I pay at least 12.50 per month. I pay administrative costs of 35 euro to get connected, need to buy a telephone and pay for each conversation (0.13/0.26 euro per minute plus starting costs of 0.06 euro per call).
I can get a cell phone for 3.95 euro per month (the cheapest new one I could get) for 2 years, with 50 minutes and 50 SMS-messages a month included (I can even listen to and make photos). I pay additional for postage and administrative costs of 23.90 euro and had to buy a memory card to make pictures (including cardreader for 15 euro).
If I would call 30 minutes in 8 telephone conversations per month for two years. With my (old) house telephone (0.20 euro per minute): 491 euro. With my (new) cell phone: 134 euro (including new telephone, memory card, camera, music player and games).
George Orwell described that in 1984 everywhere telescreens were hanging both to spy on the population and to spy on them. Hasn’t anybody figured out that this proves that they want you to walk around with your cell phone?

GSM = GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (GPS)
When I search for navigation apps for a mobile phone, they claim that these use the GPS, but in reality nothing else than the Global System for Monitoring (GSM) is needed to locate your mobile phone. I hardly can believe that you don’t even realise that when you use your phone for navigation, they know your location.
In 2001 I talked with a computer programmer working for a telephone company, that told me that he was working on an application that could compute the location of a mobile phone, by analysing the data from the 3 GSM-antennas closest to the mobile phone. I didn’t ask him how, but following is a method that could be used (maybe they’ve invented a more elegant way to do this).
The closest GSM-antenna (A) can simply send a signal to the phone, the phone replies “immediately”. It is known how fast microwaves travel (the speed of light is 300,000 km/s in vacuum) and it’s also known how fast the mobile phone replies. From this you can immediately calculate the distance r(A) from the phone to the closest antenna A. When you know the distance r(A), it’s fairly easy to compute the longer distances - r(B) and r(C) - to the 2 antennas (B, C) that are reached at a later time by the reply signal the phone sends (simply add the additional time it takes to reach antennas B and C, multiplied by the speed, to r(A)).
When you know the distances r(A), r(B) and r(C) to the closest 3 GSM-antennas you can visualise this as 3 sphere with radius r(A), r(B), r(C) around antennas A, B, C, which makes a single point.
For an example I’ve calculated it with a Phone (position: x, y, z), I use the notation ^2 for square. I choose for the location of the 3 nearest antennas: A (0, 0, 0), B (500, 0, 50), C (0, 500, 50).
1. r(A)^2 = x^2 + y^2 + z^2
2. r(B)^2 = (500 - x)^2 + y^2 + (50 – z)^2
3. r(C)^2 = x^2 + (500 - y)^2 + (50 – z)^2


Now substitute ((50 - z) ^2 from) 3. in equation 2., to get:
r(B)^2 - r(C)^2 = (500 - x)^2 + y^2 - x^2 - (500 – y)^2
<-> 4. y = x + [r(B)^2 - r(C)^2]/1000


Now substitute (y^2 from) 1. in equation 2., to get:
r(B)^2 - r(A)^2 = (500 - x)^2 - x^2 - z^2 + (50 – z)^2
<-> 5: z = -10 * x + 2525 + [r(A)^2 - r(B)^2]/100


Now substitute the formulas for y and z (4. and 5.) into the above formula 1., to get:
r(A)^2 = x^2 + { x + [r(B)^2 - r(C)^2]/1000**^2 + {-10*x + 2525 + [r(A)^2 - r(B)^2]/100**^2
<-> 6: 0 = 102*x^2 + {[101*r(B)^2 - r(C)^2 – 100* r(A)^2]/500 - 50500** * x + 6375625 + [101* r(B)^4 + r(C)^4 + 100* r(A)^4 – 2* r(C)^2* r(B)^2 – 200* r(B)^2*r(A)^2] / 1000000 + 49.5*r(A)^2 – 50.5* r(B)^2


For an example I will choose a position for the mobile phone: (100, 75, 15).
I would first get the distances to A, B, C: r(A)^2 = 15850; r(B)^2 = 166850; r(C)^2 = 191850

By inserting this in formula 4.: 0 = A*x^2 + B*x + C
A = 102; B = -20350; C = 1015000


Using the ABC-formula
x1, x2 = {-B +/- SQRT[B^2 – 4 * A * C]** / 2 * A
I get: x1, x2 = 100, 99.5
There must be some way to determine that only 100 is correct, if I insert x = 100 into formulas 4. and 5. I get the right answers: y = 75 and z = 15 (x, y, x = 100, 75, 15).
So this is proof that GSM-antennas can be used the determine somebody’s location.

WIRETAPS
When you’re dealing with computers, there’s no such thing as private or secret information. Computers decide based on authorisation if you can view information. The secret police simply needs a profile with sufficient authority to view information stored on computers (this is most easily achieved if everybody uses the same operating systems, like Microsoft and Linux).
In 1997 the FBI started using the Carnivore system, later renamed to DCS1000, to spy the internet, using data mining techniques. Ironically by the time Carnivore was officially stopped the FBI had for 2 years been using other custom built systems: http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/tech/...obsolete_x.htm
Seen from a computer technology point of view the most difficult part is not the getting access to the information, but that’s analysing the data. When you hear for example that Edward Snowden was a hacker, this is not the difficult part in spying on the population.
Whenever you hear about physically bugging a phone: this is nonsense, they tap the central server for information from the phones.

SPYING APPS – ISRAELI SPY RING
There are even commercially available apps for the cell phone, so employers can spy on their slaves and little brothers can spy on their loved ones: http://ziskje197qs2k43u.gq/cell-phon...-mind-control/
In 2001 the Israeli companies AMDOCS and Comverse Infosys were suspected of spying on the American police. AMDOCS makes the bills for most of the American telephone companies. Comverse Infosys supplies the American government, with automatic tapping equipment. In 2001 it became clear that Comverse Infosys created a backdoor so they could tap in on the telephone information.
The investigation was simply stopped (while the spying has continued): http://whatreallyhappened.com/WRHARTICLES/spyring2.html

INFORMATION AWARNESS OFFICE (IAO)
IAO of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is MUCH more ADVANCED than Carnivore: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inform...areness_Office
Because the IAO prevents terrorism and doesn’t know who the (future) terrorists are, - to be on the safe side - they spy on everybody. There have been outcries in the USA, that this is a violation of constitutional rights. The government simply told us, they stopped financing the IAO (and continued the program by a different name) and only spy on other countries (of course Americans wouldn’t mind if other countries are spied upon).
The IAO gathers all information in one giant database, including analysis of friends, family, hobbies and medical history, and uses data mining techniques to classify everybody by a danger level (1 for a good patriot and 10 for a dangerous terrorist that must be eliminated ASAP). There are nice features like: speech to text transcription, translating languages and predicting future events. IAO even helps the people in charge to make decisions and let these be carried out.
I even know how the face of Big Brother looks. It’s the all seeing eye on top of the pyramid in the logo of IAO.

Last edited by st jimmy; 29-10-2016 at 03:54 PM.
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Old 29-10-2016, 05:38 PM   #2
the apprentice
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Quote:
Originally Posted by st jimmy View Post
Most people must have seen movies or series were a police informer spies on some “bad” criminals, by wearing a “wiretap”. You must have realised that a mobile phone contains everything needed to pick up what is said?
Do you have any idea how somebody can call you on your phone, if they don’t know what the nearest GSM-antenna is?
I have never understood that people do not mind being spied upon. If for example the Nazis wouldn’t have known who the Jews were, they couldn’t have deported them to the concentration camps.
One of the main reasons Big Brother wants to know what’s going on, is to verify that the brainwashing of the slaves is working (and how it needs to be adjusted).

GSM 134 EURO – OLD PHONE 491 EURO
You could look at it financially: as a rule of thumb old technology is cheaper than new.
If I want my (old) house telephone connected I pay at least 12.50 per month. I pay administrative costs of 35 euro to get connected, need to buy a telephone and pay for each conversation (0.13/0.26 euro per minute plus starting costs of 0.06 euro per call).
I can get a cell phone for 3.95 euro per month (the cheapest new one I could get) for 2 years, with 50 minutes and 50 SMS-messages a month included (I can even listen to and make photos). I pay additional for postage and administrative costs of 23.90 euro and had to buy a memory card to make pictures (including cardreader for 15 euro).
If I would call 30 minutes in 8 telephone conversations per month for two years. With my (old) house telephone (0.20 euro per minute): 491 euro. With my (new) cell phone: 134 euro (including new telephone, memory card, camera, music player and games).
George Orwell described that in 1984 everywhere telescreens were hanging both to spy on the population and to spy on them. Hasn’t anybody figured out that this proves that they want you to walk around with your cell phone?

GSM = GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (GPS)
When I search for navigation apps for a mobile phone, they claim that these use the GPS, but in reality nothing else than the Global System for Monitoring (GSM) is needed to locate your mobile phone. I hardly can believe that you don’t even realise that when you use your phone for navigation, they know your location.
In 2001 I talked with a computer programmer working for a telephone company, that told me that he was working on an application that could compute the location of a mobile phone, by analysing the data from the 3 GSM-antennas closest to the mobile phone. I didn’t ask him how, but following is a method that could be used (maybe they’ve invented a more elegant way to do this).
The closest GSM-antenna (A) can simply send a signal to the phone, the phone replies “immediately”. It is known how fast microwaves travel (the speed of light is 300,000 km/s in vacuum) and it’s also known how fast the mobile phone replies. From this you can immediately calculate the distance r(A) from the phone to the closest antenna A. When you know the distance r(A), it’s fairly easy to compute the longer distances - r(B) and r(C) - to the 2 antennas (B, C) that are reached at a later time by the reply signal the phone sends (simply add the additional time it takes to reach antennas B and C, multiplied by the speed, to r(A)).
When you know the distances r(A), r(B) and r(C) to the closest 3 GSM-antennas you can visualise this as 3 sphere with radius r(A), r(B), r(C) around antennas A, B, C, which makes a single point.
For an example I’ve calculated it with a Phone (position: x, y, z), I use the notation ^2 for square. I choose for the location of the 3 nearest antennas: A (0, 0, 0), B (500, 0, 50), C (0, 500, 50).
1. r(A)^2 = x^2 + y^2 + z^2
2. r(B)^2 = (500 - x)^2 + y^2 + (50 – z)^2
3. r(C)^2 = x^2 + (500 - y)^2 + (50 – z)^2


Now substitute ((50 - z) ^2 from) 3. in equation 2., to get:
r(B)^2 - r(C)^2 = (500 - x)^2 + y^2 - x^2 - (500 – y)^2
<-> 4. y = x + [r(B)^2 - r(C)^2]/1000


Now substitute (y^2 from) 1. in equation 2., to get:
r(B)^2 - r(A)^2 = (500 - x)^2 - x^2 - z^2 + (50 – z)^2
<-> 5: z = -10 * x + 2525 + [r(A)^2 - r(B)^2]/100


Now substitute the formulas for y and z (4. and 5.) into the above formula 1., to get:
r(A)^2 = x^2 + { x + [r(B)^2 - r(C)^2]/1000**^2 + {-10*x + 2525 + [r(A)^2 - r(B)^2]/100**^2
<-> 6: 0 = 102*x^2 + {[101*r(B)^2 - r(C)^2 – 100* r(A)^2]/500 - 50500** * x + 6375625 + [101* r(B)^4 + r(C)^4 + 100* r(A)^4 – 2* r(C)^2* r(B)^2 – 200* r(B)^2*r(A)^2] / 1000000 + 49.5*r(A)^2 – 50.5* r(B)^2


For an example I will choose a position for the mobile phone: (100, 75, 15).
I would first get the distances to A, B, C: r(A)^2 = 15850; r(B)^2 = 166850; r(C)^2 = 191850

By inserting this in formula 4.: 0 = A*x^2 + B*x + C
A = 102; B = -20350; C = 1015000


Using the ABC-formula
x1, x2 = {-B +/- SQRT[B^2 – 4 * A * C]** / 2 * A
I get: x1, x2 = 100, 99.5
There must be some way to determine that only 100 is correct, if I insert x = 100 into formulas 4. and 5. I get the right answers: y = 75 and z = 15 (x, y, x = 100, 75, 15).
So this is proof that GSM-antennas can be used the determine somebody’s location.

WIRETAPS
When you’re dealing with computers, there’s no such thing as private or secret information. Computers decide based on authorisation if you can view information. The secret police simply needs a profile with sufficient authority to view information stored on computers (this is most easily achieved if everybody uses the same operating systems, like Microsoft and Linux).
In 1997 the FBI started using the Carnivore system, later renamed to DCS1000, to spy the internet, using data mining techniques. Ironically by the time Carnivore was officially stopped the FBI had for 2 years been using other custom built systems: http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/tech/...obsolete_x.htm
Seen from a computer technology point of view the most difficult part is not the getting access to the information, but that’s analysing the data. When you hear for example that Edward Snowden was a hacker, this is not the difficult part in spying on the population.
Whenever you hear about physically bugging a phone: this is nonsense, they tap the central server for information from the phones.

SPYING APPS – ISRAELI SPY RING
There are even commercially available apps for the cell phone, so employers can spy on their slaves and little brothers can spy on their loved ones: http://ziskje197qs2k43u.gq/cell-phon...-mind-control/
In 2001 the Israeli companies AMDOCS and Comverse Infosys were suspected of spying on the American police. AMDOCS makes the bills for most of the American telephone companies. Comverse Infosys supplies the American government, with automatic tapping equipment. In 2001 it became clear that Comverse Infosys created a backdoor so they could tap in on the telephone information.
The investigation was simply stopped (while the spying has continued): http://whatreallyhappened.com/WRHARTICLES/spyring2.html

INFORMATION AWARNESS OFFICE (IAO)
IAO of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is MUCH more ADVANCED than Carnivore: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inform...areness_Office
Because the IAO prevents terrorism and doesn’t know who the (future) terrorists are, - to be on the safe side - they spy on everybody. There have been outcries in the USA, that this is a violation of constitutional rights. The government simply told us, they stopped financing the IAO (and continued the program by a different name) and only spy on other countries (of course Americans wouldn’t mind if other countries are spied upon).
The IAO gathers all information in one giant database, including analysis of friends, family, hobbies and medical history, and uses data mining techniques to classify everybody by a danger level (1 for a good patriot and 10 for a dangerous terrorist that must be eliminated ASAP). There are nice features like: speech to text transcription, translating languages and predicting future events. IAO even helps the people in charge to make decisions and let these be carried out.
I even know how the face of Big Brother looks. It’s the all seeing eye on top of the pyramid in the logo of IAO.
Hello GCHQ, how are you.
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Old 30-10-2016, 04:32 PM   #3
st jimmy
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In a nice Orwellian twist I get the following welcome message from the GCHQ site “As Director, I’d like to welcome you to GCHQ. I hope our website will help you to understand more about what we do to protect the UK”: https://www.gchq.gov.uk/features/welcome-to-gchq

In the Netherlands a concept law about spying on the people was actually withdrawn and I haven’t heard anything about it since. The uproar was not about the spying in general, but spying on civilians by smart appliances in their home.

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Old 30-10-2016, 04:36 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by st jimmy View Post
In a nice Orwellian twist I get the following welcome message from the GCHQ site “As Director, I’d like to welcome you to GCHQ. I hope our website will help you to understand more about what we do to protect the UK”: https://www.gchq.gov.uk/features/welcome-to-gchq

In the Netherlands a concept law about spying on the people was actually withdrawn and I haven’t heard anything about it since. The uproar was not about the spying in general, but spying on civilians by smart appliances in their home.
It goes on all the time.
If an agency such as GCHQ has tech that can spy on us ( it does) then it will use that tech.
No biggie.
"Nothing to hide = Nothing to fear"
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Old 30-10-2016, 04:42 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by grandmasterp View Post
If an agency such as GCHQ has tech that can spy on us ( it does) then it will use that tech.
No biggie.
"Nothing to hide = Nothing to fear"
No I definitely don't agree. We are surviving in a world were the main objective of "health care" is to reduce the population. The Nazis knew who the Jews in the Netherlands were because the Dutch government kept records about that. And the Nazis used computers provided by them by the Rothschild controlled IBM (the Rothschild family says they are Jews, I call them Ashke-Nazis).
Quote:
Originally Posted by st jimmy View Post
I have never understood that people do not mind being spied upon. If for example the Nazis wouldn’t have known who the Jews were, they couldn’t have deported them to the concentration camps.

Last edited by st jimmy; 30-10-2016 at 04:42 PM.
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Old 30-10-2016, 04:58 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by st jimmy View Post
No I definitely don't agree. We are surviving in a world were the main objective of "health care" is to reduce the population. The Nazis knew who the Jews in the Netherlands were because the Dutch government kept records about that. And the Nazis used computers provided by them by the Rothschild controlled IBM (the Rothschild family says they are Jews, I call them Ashke-Nazis).
I'm not saying that spying is right Jim just that it goes on all the time.
GCHQ can see whatever we type online, follow every second of online activity we engage in, read all our emails, listen in on every phone call we make and track us via CCTV.
As and when GCHQ chooses to do so.
Cos they can, they have the tech to do it.
Basically though, if we aren't up to mischief of some sort.. they aint interested.
Nothing to hide = Nothing to fear

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Old 30-10-2016, 06:59 PM   #7
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You can have all the tech in the world, but what is it that processes all that information? Drones, compartmentalized button pushers, and AI with no emotional discernment. All of it, an externalization of the paranoid system, which will eventually collapse under the weight of so much information.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stasi#...he_Stasi_files

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Old 30-10-2016, 08:26 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by paddy_blake View Post
You can have all the tech in the world, but what is it that processes all that information? Drones, compartmentalized button pushers, and AI with no emotional discernment. All of it, an externalization of the paranoid system, which will eventually collapse under the weight of so much information.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stasi#...he_Stasi_files
That's right, but there is one tech they cannot control and thats night or day.
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Old 31-10-2016, 09:06 AM   #9
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Good OP for those who didn't know about such things.

Add to it, the fact that phones can still be used to spy on you even when they are 'turned off' - especially models with non-removable batteries (I'm looking at you Apple)!

I have tried this myself - check battery percentage, turn phone 'off' overnight. Turn it 'on' again the next morning - behold the battery percentage dropped by a good few points.

Simple way not to be tracked or bugged - don't carry a mobile phone.
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Old 31-10-2016, 10:29 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by grandmasterp View Post
I'm not saying that spying is right Jim just that it goes on all the time.
GCHQ can see whatever we type online, follow every second of online activity we engage in, read all our emails, listen in on every phone call we make and track us via CCTV.
As and when GCHQ chooses to do so.
Cos they can, they have the tech to do it.
Basically though, if we aren't up to mischief of some sort.. they aint interested.
Nothing to hide = Nothing to fear
Maybe we should use pen and paper fifty percent of the time instead of Face Ache then they can only watch us fifty percent of the time.
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Old 23-01-2017, 04:29 PM   #11
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Default Project Indect

It appears that Big Brother in the European Union “respects” the privacy of its subjects about as good as in the USA. I like to share what I’ve found about “Project Indect”.
Please note that all of these sites don’t seem to understand how mobile phones are used to spy on us all.

PROJECT INDECT
The surveillance system, known as Project Indect of the European Union (EU), collects information by way of “continuous monitoring” of “web sites, discussion forums, usenet groups, file servers, p2p networks [and] individual computer systems”. It will also use CCTV feeds and other surveillance methods to develop models of “suspicious behaviour” by analyzing the pitch of people’s voices as well as “the way their bodies move”.
The following text was found on the official website for Indect: "Our focus is on novel techniques for word sense induction, entity resolution, relationship mining, social network analysis [and] sentiment analysis".
Its main objective will be the “automatic detection of threats and abnormal behavior or violence”: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/ukne...behaviour.html
And what would be considered strange behaviour? Reading a real book, keeping a handwritten agenda (instead of the agenda on your phone) or leaving your mobile phone when you leave your house. Reading this thread will certainly be suspicious.
Indect has started the SSIX platform that acquires language resources for Sentiment Analysis: http://blog.lionbridge.com/suomi/201...ncial-indices/

SITCEN
Project Indect is part of the Joint Situation Centre (SitCen) that was originally established to monitor and assess worldwide events and situations on a 24-hour basis with a focus on potential crisis regions, terrorism and WMD-proliferation. To make it all so very democratic nobody seems to know what SitCen is up to.
SitCen is in turn part of EU Intelligence and Situation Centre (EU INTCEN) that has its roots in the European Security and Defence Policy of 1999.
Since 2007 INTCEN is part of the Single Intelligence Analysis Capacity (SIAC), which combines civilian intelligence (EU INTCEN) and military intelligence (EUMS Intelligence Directorate): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Europe...tuation_Centre

ECHELON
In 1999, the BBC made information from the Australian government public that "As you would expect there are a large amount of radio communications floating around in the atmosphere, and agencies such as DSD collect those communications in the interests of their national security".
The GSM network functions on microwaves that are floating around and if by chance internet traffic is sent wireless, they can record all that information (this cannot be a violation of privacy can it; when it’s just floating in the air?).
This information is then shared with the US National Security Agency (NSA) at Fort Mead in Maryland, and Britain's GCHQ: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/503224.stm

CCTV CAMERAS
We have been told that security cameras are used to prevent and solve crimes. It has been admitted by the British Metropolitan Police that “For every 1,000 cameras in London, less than one crime is solved per year”: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/ukne...ce-admits.html

COMPARISON TO ORWELL’S 1984
I found an interesting comparison between the 1984 that George Orwell described and how we are watched in the 21th century. The following are some descriptions about reality.
All information accessed through the internet is stored on countless hard drives in large information centres and distributed via broadband, satellite, and cellular connections. Anything done on the internet can never be permanently deleted.
Every time you “Accept to these terms and conditions”, you are allowing that source to any of the information it specified.
The Facebook app uses the devices’ camera and microphone at any time to gather pictures and sounds.
Police can hack into your phone's microphone to listen in on conversations: https://prezi.com/gdzaqhv6px_w/engli...e-present-day/
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Old 23-01-2017, 08:32 PM   #12
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Of all the big issues affecting or indirectly affecting people (whether important or meaningless), the issue of CCTV and internet surveillance being used to spy and monitor people just does not register in the minds of the general public, and nor is the subject ever voiced. You can have the public talk about Trump, Brexit, dodgy politicians, illegal wars, etc, but the surveillance state debate (and all the other interrelated crap that goes with it, like using the excuse of crime and terrorism to strip away more and more of everyone's privacy and freedom's) is non existent. How can anybody not notice the insane amount of CCTV cameras everywhere in the UK?, everywhere from the airport, to the high street, schools, etc. Is it fair that every aspect of your day, especially when with family and friends, is recorded and monitored?. And every private and personal conversations via email are also monitored?. It's outrageous.

I kinda get the impression that the reason people don't talk about these concerns I'd because they don't quite accept the true reality of the extent of the surveillance. People see one or two cameras dotted around the place, but don't realise it is far, far more widespread and intrusive than what they think.

Last edited by techman; 23-01-2017 at 08:37 PM.
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Old 15-09-2017, 11:42 AM   #13
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Default Smart TV, Car hacking, Smartphones, NSA

On March 7 2017, Wikileaks put 8761 documents on the internet about systematic CIA infiltration of computers around the world.
SMART TV
The following is interesting (to say the least) - Weeping Angel. It’s designed to hack into Samsung F8000-Series “smart” televisions. Even when the telescreen is switched off, they can use the TV's microphone and webcam to spy on you: https://wikileaks.org/ciav7p1/cms/page_12353643.html

CAR HACKING
Besides the Weeping angel that can use a Samsung telescreen to spy on you, arguably the most interesting is that the CIA was discussing the possibility to hack cars.
I agree with Wikileaks that this is enough evidence to suspect that the CIA wants to take over the vehicle control systems. This leads to the conclusion that the CIA can carry out car crashes, without leaving evidence.
Wikileaks has redacted the files by removing identifying information of involved government officials and tens of thousands of CIA targets and attack machines throughout Latin America, Europe and the USA.
Please note that the CIA uses the HIVE suite to also hack Linux systems.
Here’s the press release by Wikileaks on the latest dump - part of the series dubbed “Year zero”: https://wikileaks.org/ciav7p1/

Any idea why the US federal government has required that all cars since 1996 install onboard computers?

There is even (older) evidence that it’s relatively easy to hack car computers, which shows beyond a doubt that the CIA could take over car control systems.
In 2008, a 14-year-old altered a television remote control to take control of trams in the city of Lodz, Poland, derailing several trams.
In 2010, a 20-year-old man with a modicum of computer savvy hacked car computers in a Texas Auto Center causing some mayhem.
In 2015, security researchers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek hacked into a Jeep Cherokee and managed to “turn the steering wheel, briefly disable the brakes and shut down the engine”. Miller achieved this from more than a mile away by a MacBook, without any installed device needed.

Valasek and Miller also found readily accessible Internet links to thousands of other Jeeps, Dodges and Chryslers that used the wireless entertainment and navigation system Uconnect. By typing the right series of computer commands, they could easily hack into these vehicles from a distance.
Earlier in 2013 Miller and Valasek appeared on NBC’s “Today” show to override the control of a car — yanking the steering wheel, disabling the brakes and shutting off the engine.
According to experts, because the security on automotive systems is “15 years, maybe 20 years behind” they’re not difficult to hack.

In 2013, Samy Kamkar used a creation called SkyJack and less than $100 in extra gear to transform a basic drone into an attack vehicle capable of taking control of drones that flu nearby: http://www.washingtonpost.com/sf/bus...=.6425e31fd6f1

The same Washington Post that wrote the previous article has published a reaction on the recent Wikileaks “Year zero” dump.
In 2010 and 2011, researchers from the Universities of Washington and California showed that vehicles could be compromised when hackers gain access, either in person or remotely.
In 2016, researchers in Germany showed that they could unlock and start 24 different vehicles with wireless key fobs by taking control of the device remotely and amplifying its signal. This shows that cars can easily be stolen with this technology.
Yoni Heilbronn explained: “The equation is very simple. If it’s a computer and it connects to the outside world, then it is hackable”.
There is hard evidence that cars can be remotely controlled (hacked) and that the CIA has been exploring these possibilities. Isn’t this enough evidence that the CIA would actually do this? According to the Washington Post we don’t have to worry and car computers are mostly a good thing: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.d29dd42942a8

I’ve also found some interesting articles originating from the German “Der Spiegel” about spy technology. Der Spiegel focuses on the National Security Agency (NSA) and CIA, but of course European and Chinese intelligence agencies do the same.
Here’s a story about the recent Wikileaks dump: http://www.spiegel.de/international/...a-1137740.html


NSA – PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH
The NSA's broad data collection programs were originally authorized by President Bush Jr. on October 4, 2001. In March 2004 a Justice Department review declared the bulk Internet metadata program was illegal. President Bush signed an order re-authorising it anyway. By 2007, all aspects of the program were re-authorised by court orders from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC). By definition, the FISC decides what it is legal for the NSA.
The NSA records metadata about almost all calls made in the USA, including telephone numbers and call duration. This was revealed through a leaked secret court order, which instructed Verizon to turn over all such information on a daily basis.
Phone company records reveal where you are at the time a call is made.

The NSA intercepts and stores billions of communication records per day. Including emails, social media posts, visited web sites, addresses typed into Google Maps and files sent.
The NSA records the audio contents of “some” phone calls. I haven’t seen any real restriction on this.
Watching a specific person is called “targeting”; Targeted Individuals are even watched more closely.
Facebook revealed that in the last six months of 2012, they handed over the private data of between 18,000 and 19,000 users to law enforcement of all types - including local and federal police.

According to a leaked report the NSA intercepted content from 37,664 telephone numbers and email addresses from October 2001 to January 2007. Of these, 8% were domestic (2612 US phone numbers and 406 US email addresses).
The NSA has been prohibited from recording domestic communication since the passage of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA). But because the NSA can’t be expected to distinguish between foreign and domestic communication, that’s an empty restriction. Analysts need only “51% confidence” that someone is a non-US person before tapping (this means they can tap if they don’t know).
There are no restrictions whatsoever on spying abroad. Likewise the British GCHQ can tap US citizens, and then share it with the NSA: https://www.propublica.org/article/n...collection-faq

In January 2014 the “The New York Times” reported that the NSA uses radio-wave technology to spy on “computers” not connected to the Internet.
Der Spiegel obtained documents on NSA’s division Advanced Network Technology (ANT) from 2008 (since then great progress has been made). Here are some of the programs.
IRONCHEF is installed on Proliant servers by Hewlett-Packard.
ANGRYNEIGHBOR can track objects in rooms, listen in, and see what's displayed on monitors.
SURLYSPAWN logs keystrokes even when offline; using radio frequency.
TAWDRYYARD intercepts the traffic from a computer video card's VGA output to a monitor.
Candygram can mimic a GSM cell tower network to catch phone data.
NIGHTSTAND can attack Windows computers by an 802.11 wireless exploit.
IRATEMONK is implanted on target PCs, and can send data when a computer is turned on.
HOWLERMONKEY hides within computer hardware, like an Ethernet port to slurp bytes coming through the physical connection, and send the information to base via a radio link: https://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2429502,00.asp


Following are some excerpts from an IG report of 2009 that confirm that the NSA has been spying on everything without restrictions: https://www.documentcloud.org/docume...nt/p10/a107511
Pages 9, 10.
Quote:
SIGINT Activity Authorized by the President On 4 October 2001, the President delegated authority through the Secretary of Defense to the Director of NSA to conduct specified electronic surveillance on targets related to Afghanistan and international terrorism for 30 days. Because the surveillance included wire and cable communications carried into or out of the United States, it would otherwise have required FISC authority. F) The Authorization allowed NSA to conduct four types of collection activity:Telephony content Intemet content Telephony metadata Intemet metadata F) NSA could collect the content and associated metadata of telephony and Intemet communications for which there was probable cause to believe that one of the communicants was in Afghanistan or that one communicant was engaged in or preparing for acts of international terrorism. In addition, NSA was authorized to acquire telephony and Intemet metadata for communications with at least one communicant outside the United States or for which no communicant was known to be a citizen of the United States. NSA was also allowed to retain, process, analyze and disseminate intelligence from the communications acquired…
Page 32
Quote:
On 11 February 2002, the company’s CEO agreed to cooperate with NSA. On 19 February 2002, COMPANY submitted a written proposal that discussed methods it could use to regularly replicate call record information stored in a COMPANY facility and potentially forward the same information to NSA. Discussions with COMPANY continued in 2003. However, the COMPANY General Counsel ultimately decided not to support NSA.On 5 September 2002, NSA legal and operational personnel met with intemet provider COMPANY D's General Counsel to discuss the PSP and ask for the company's support. COMPANY provided support, but it was minimal. (For a description of COMPANY D's support, see page "What Providers Furnished.”).On 29 October 2002, NSA legal and operational personnel met with intemet provider COMPANY F's Legal and Corporate Affairs personnel, and a former NSA OGC employee hired by COMPANY as independent counsel. NSA requested COMPANY F's support under the PSP for email content. At the meeting, COMPANY requested a letter from the Attomey General certifying the legality of the PSP. In December 2002, NSA's Commercial Technologies Group was informed that the company's CEO agreed to support the PSP. According to NSA’s General Counsel, COMPANY did not participate in the PSP because of corporate liability concerns.
Page 40, 41.
Quote:
Until March 2004, NSA considered its collection of bulk Internet metadata under the PSP to be legal and appropriate. Specifically, NSA leadership, including OGC lawyers and the IG, interpreted the terms of the Authorization to allow NSA to obtain bulk Internet metadata for analysis because NSA did not actually "acquire" communications until specific Communications were selected. In other words, because the Authorization permitted NSA to conduct metadata analysis on selectors that met certain criteria, it implicitly authorized NSA to obtain the bulk data that was needed to conduct the metadata analysis.On 11 March 2004, General Hayden had to decide whether NSA would execute the Authorization without the Attorney General's signature General Hayden described a conversation in which David Addington asked, you do it At that time, General Hayden also said that he asked Daniel Levin, Counsel to the Attorney General, in March 2004 if he needed to stop anything he was doing. Mr Levin said that he did not need to stop anything and lV-A/32a- After conferring with NSA operational and Legal personnel, General Hayden stated that he decided to continue the PSP because 1) the members of Congress he briefed the previous day, 10 March, were supportive of continuing the Program, 2) he knew the value of the Program, and 3) NSA lawyers had determined the Program was legal.Eight days later on 19 March 2004, the President rescinded the authority to collect bulk Intemet metadata and gave NSA one week to stop collection and block access to previously collected bulk Intemet metadata. NSA did so on 26 March 2004. To close the resulting collection gap, Do] and NSA immediately began efforts to recreate this authority in what became the order. By January 2007, the remaining three authorities had also been replicated in FISC orders: the Business Records (BR) Order, the Foreign Content Order, and the Domestic Content Order. On 1 February 2007, the final Authorization was allowed to expire and was not renewed.

SMARTPHONES
The greatest amount of information can be collected by smartphones. I guess we could know, but rather pretend we don’t that nice gadgets like the iPhone or BlackBerry are designed to find out everything there is to know about us.
A NSA presentation "Does your target have a smartphone?" shows how extensive the surveillance methods against users of Apple's iPhone are (in 2013). According to the document, some problems with the BlackBerry data were suddenly encountered in May and June 2009, but these problems were totally resolved by March 2010: http://www.spiegel.de/international/...-a-921161.html

On the following site is a visualisation of how the German politician Malte Spitz was followed by monitoring the data from his cell Phone: http://www.zeit.de/datenschutz/malte...data-retention
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Old 17-09-2017, 04:22 PM   #14
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I found the following interesting article from 2013 which really adds something to this thread: http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2013/...ther-ways.html

The PRISM leaks show that the NSA has pre-encryption stage access to Microsoft’s email products, which makes encryption useless, if you want to keep things secret from the government.
Cell towers track where your phone is at any moment; so the government can track your location.
Starting in 2014, all new cars will include “black boxes” that can track your location. A 2003 lawsuit showed that the FBI can turn on the built-in microphones in cars by General Motors’ OnStar.
Of course “smart” home appliances are also used to spy on you in your house.

Google – or the NSA – can remotely turn on your phone’s camera and recorder at any time.
In 2013 there was some controversy when it became known that Facebook can use the video and microphone at any time of an Android with the Facebook app installed.
Facebook confirmed that they can use the app to spy on the gullible people, but won’t do that: http://www.businessinsider.com/faceb...true&r=US&IR=T

A 2006 court ruling revealed that the FBI has the ability to turn a cell phone into a listening device that transmits to an FBI listening post (a "roving bug"). The only way to stop the FBI from listening in on what’s said around the phone is to remove the cell phone battery.
The legal procedure was not if the FBI is allowed to spy (without a warrant), but only about if they can use this data in a court case: http://blogs.abcnews.com/theblotter/...u_hear_me.html
I guess that smashing a phone up with a hammer or - less drastically - drop your phone in a “Faraday cage” can also stop it being used to spy on you.

The best from this article are “smart” street lights to spy on us...
In Britain Middlesbrough in 2006, streetlights with speakers were introduced to give warnings to people.
In 2011, Illuminating Concepts began installing the system “Intellistreets” in Farmington Hills, Michigan. These “smart” streetlights got microphones to monitor conversations.
Intellistreets is also equipped with proximity sensors to record pedestrian and road traffic: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...cy-alerts.html

According to the following story from 2013 the Intellistreets that was installed in Las Vegas can also shoot video.
The advertisement that ended with the phrase “Intellistreets also enables a myriad of homeland security features” on Youtube became a little controversial: https://www.cnet.com/news/street-lig...pens-in-vegas/

Here’s another story from 2014 about the use of “smart” LED streetlights with motion sensors.
The “smart” light network can spot an unattended bag at an airport and alert security, show drivers to empty parking spaces and alert shoppers of sales: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/technolo...vacy-concerns/

Last April 3 Donald Trump signed into law a controversial measure repealing online privacy protections established by the FCC under Obama. This will allow internet providers to sell information about their customers' browsing habits. Including information on emails.
White House press secretary Sean Spicer explained that the objectives for the bill are "to fight Washington red tape that stifles American innovation, job creation and economic growth".
We can expect that internet providers will become the target for hackers (for example the NSA, CIA and GCHQ): http://www.nydailynews.com/news/poli...icle-1.3018231
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Old 19-09-2017, 03:01 PM   #15
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Default New Dutch law

Last 12 July, the Dutch Senate (Eerste kamer) passed the new “tapping law” which gives the intelligence agencies (AIVD and MIVD) the right to gather data practically without limitations.
The law was passed with broad support from Dutch parliament, and according to the NOS will go into effect on 1 January 2018.

This includes hacking into devices (for example computers or cell phones) of (large) groups that aren’t suspected of any crime.
The AIVD can for example make telecom providers deliver them the chat traffic in a city of 400,000 inhabitants, under the guise of wanting the communication of 200 users.
The intelligence agencies are allowed to:
- intercept all internet communication;
- hack into devices, of people who aren't suspected of anything, but know somebody who is a suspect;
- read and/or destroy documents;
- use devices’ microphones to listen in on conversations.

The AIVD and MIVD can set up companies, to spy on people.
Companies provide the intelligence agencies with real-time information.
The intelligence agencies are allowed to store the information for a maximum of 3 years: http://nltimes.nl/2017/07/12/dutch-s...ata-mining-law

The “tapping law” also gives the intelligence agencies the right to sell this information to “reliable” partners, like the British and American intelligence agencies.
The intelligence agencies can enter houses, to install (surveillance) equipment and confiscate things found.
The intelligence agencies can also spy on “old type” mail (the type in an envelope).


Here is the new accepted law “Wet op de inlichtingen- en veiligheidsdiensten” (in Dutch): https://www.rijksoverheid.nl/documen...igheidsdienten

In my opinion the most interesting is article 41.
According to article 41, the intelligence agencies can provide agents with new identities for their wonderful work.
These agents are allowed to participate in criminal activity…
Combine this with the fact that the AIVD and MIVD are allowed to set up front companies to support “national interests”…

The state media are spreading rumours that some civil rights organisations will start a court case over this clear disregard for our privacy. I really don’t understand what this could be based on.
In the Kingdom of the Netherlands, judges cannot rule over violations of constitutional rights. The Dutch judges can only rule based on the law. This makes it impossible for any judge to decide that a law violates human rights…
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Old 02-10-2017, 04:14 PM   #16
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As my computer activity is firmly based on walking around with an USB-stick in my pocket with thousands of hours of research, I’m probably more interested in privacy-issues concerning a flash drive than the average person.
There is hardware or software that can copy all the files on my USB as soon as I connect it to a computer.
Devices like these can easily be found on the internet (the intelligence agencies have even more advanced technology); for example: http://steppschuh.net/software/usbcopier/


The following is a story by somebody in the UK, who found out that his new LG Smart telescreen was spying on him and his family, and then did his own investigation.
He noticed an option in the system settings called "Collection of watching info" which is ON by default. After he switched it off, it continued to send information unencrypted over the internet every time he changed the channel.

One of the ads, which was displayed on his TV, showed that it analyses users’ favourite programs, online behaviour, search keywords and other information to offer relevant ads to target audiences.
LG Smart Ad advertises its products, with the claim it offers useful advertising performance reports, to identify advertising effectiveness.
He also noticed that filenames stored on his external USB hard drive were posted to LG's servers. They were shocked to see their children's names being transmitted after watching a video file from USB.

He sent a message to LG to complain about this invasion of his privacy, he got a response that he should take it up with the retailer:
Quote:
The advice we have been given is that unfortunately as you accepted the Terms and Conditions on your TV, your concerns would be best directed to the retailer. We understand you feel you should have been made aware of these T's and C's at the point of sale, and for obvious reasons LG are unable to pass comment on their actions.
http://doctorbeet.blogspot.nl/2013/1...names-and.html


I end this post with a story that details how MS Windows logs all sorts of information (this is regular Windows, not something specifically designed by the NSA or GCHQ).
Whether you launch an application, open a file, tweak a setting, visit a website, just about everything is recorded, and saved in a list.
When you delete a reference from a particular document, this won't necessarily be removed from the jump list. And even if it is, it can possibly be recovered.
Windows is very good at tracking hardware. It maintains details on every USB device which has ever connected to your PC, and when it did.
Windows also records every wireless network your system has connected to: http://www.techradar.com/news/comput...vities-1029906
The last article ends with the following well meant advice:
Quote:
So our advice would be not to get too paranoid, and don't take actions which will adversely affect your PC (like turning off prefetching): the privacy gains will be minimal, and it anyone wants to discover more about your activities then there are plenty of other ways to do so, anyway.
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Old 05-10-2017, 06:01 PM   #17
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Big brother doesn't know what I'm going to make next.
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Old 06-10-2017, 04:07 PM   #18
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According to some they already have technology to read your mind.

While there are ways to predict what somebody thinks or will "make next", I believe that my thoughts are still private.

Unfortunately they can see what information I look for on the internet, so have a good indication what posts I can make.
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Old 06-10-2017, 05:52 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by st jimmy View Post
According to some they already have technology to read your mind.

While there are ways to predict what somebody thinks or will "make next", I believe that my thoughts are still private.

Unfortunately they can see what information I look for on the internet, so have a good indication what posts I can make.
They might be able to, but I can change it like the wind when I'm in making mode, I hope they do read it though then they will know how much they are loosing in retail therapy.

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Old 19-11-2017, 04:23 PM   #20
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Default Palantir

Even when Big Brother has all the information about us stored on computers, there’s still a problem.
They need some kind of application that can analyse the huge amount of information, for example to discover dangerous “thoughtcriminals”. In short this functionality is called data-mining.
Being a forum member of Davidicke.com could be considered a risk, especially if you read my posts...

Palantir is one of the data-mining tools used by big government.
Palantir’s relationship with intelligence agencies dates back to at least 2008, when representatives from the British Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) and US intelligence agencies were impressed by the achievements of Palantir, at the annual VisWeek conference. Within 2 years at least 3 members of the “Five Eyes” spy alliance between the United States, GB, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada were using Palantir.
The CIA was an early investor in the Palantir start-up through In-Q-Tel. Computer scientists from Palantir collaborated with analysts from various intelligence agencies to develop its products.
Palantir refuses to name its government clientele, despite landing “at least $1.2 billion” in federal contracts since 2009. It’s clear that the CIA, NSA and GCHQ have used Palantir.

Palantir sells 2 main products: Palantir Gotham (formerly Palantir Government) and Palantir Metropolis. Metropolis is used for quantitative analysis for Wall Street banks and hedge funds. Gotham is designed for the needs of intelligence agencies and law enforcement.
Palantir Gotham is used to make spying on all of us possible. You can see this as an internet search engine that actually finds what you’re looking for and uses graphics to visualise what has been found. This is a very powerful tool when used by intelligence agencies that have access to “confidential” information, including password protected contents, emails, documents saved on iCloud, etc.
Palantir connects separate databases, pulling big buckets of information (call records, IP addresses, financial transactions, names, conversations, travel records, etc.) into one centralised heap and visualise them coherently: https://theintercept.com/2017/02/22/...e-whole-world/


I haven’t found information about Palantir Metropolis (for analysis for banks). It is clear that by having access to the tricks of the best traders, the elite can become even better at using the financial markets to take everything we have.

Palantir is one of companies of Peter Thiel. Peter Thiel is relatively intelligent; he won first place in a California-wide mathematics competition while attending middle school.
Peter Thiel was one of the main contributors to the presidential campaign of Donald Trump. Thiel has also contributed to campaigns of other politicians (including Ron and Rand Paul).
Peter Thiel is a member of the infamous Bilderberg group, and he supports research in parabiosis (the modern name for vampirism).
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