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Old 25-10-2009, 09:37 PM   #1
wakeup2nwo
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Default RFID/VERI/NANO Chip updates

Anyone with NEW information on the implementation of RFID chips NANO chips or VERI chips, Please keep this Thread updated... Its our Future of control unless we learn and teach others the endgame to RFID technology.
Thanks!



The most recent story's are..........



Massachusetts General Uses RFID to Better Understand Its Clinics


A patient- and employee-tracking system, provided by Radianse, will enable the Boston hospital's clinics to gather complex information regarding patient flow and bottlenecks, with the goal of improving care.
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By Claire Swedberg

Oct. 23, 2009—After several years of testing RFID to track patients and staff members in its operating room (OR) department, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) is now rolling out the same technology in a more challenging environment in which patient movement is not nearly as predictable—at medical clinics throughout the Boston area. Provided by Radianse, the system, known as Radianse Reveal, includes active 433 MHz RFID tags in the form of badges worn by workers and patients. Thus far, three clinics are employing Radianse Reveal, with the system slated to go live at another five locations by the end of the first quarter of 2010.

"Our incentive is to gain a better understanding of how our clinical systems behave," says James Stahl, a medical doctor and senior scientist with MGH's Institute for Technology Assessment. Unlike the tracking of assets or patients through an OR, tracking patients' movements through a clinic, Stahl says, "is a very complex system in terms of how resources are managed."


James Stahl, a senior scientist with MGH's Institute for Technology Assessment
While the goal is to provide patients with better access to care, understanding the movements of those patients and the care they receive is a daunting task that must be undertaken before MGH can determine how such a scenario can be improved. No patient is like any other, nor are his or her conditions and the treatments he or she requires. Although clinics can use anecdotal evidence to determine whether care is being provided as efficiently as possible, without a good means of measuring each visit, it's difficult to know what improvements to make. For example, it's not easy to track where delays had occurred, whether a physician spent the proper time with a patient, or how long a patient sat alone in an examining room.

The three MGH Boston clinics utilizing the system typically serve 20 to 40 patients per physician each day, with approximately three physicians at each location. Two of the clinics installing the system see patients on a scheduled basis, while one is a walk-in clinic.

In 2005, Massachusetts General set up a trial of Radianse RFID technology to track employees and patients in its OR unit. At the time, Stahl served as the research director of the trial project, known as the Operating Room of the Future (ORF). The project's goal was to determine whether RFID technology could track the movements of patients and staff members, and improve the operation room workflow based on that data. The technology is still in place in the OR, Stahl says, but has been deactivated for the time being.

The use of RFID at the clinics is a permanent deployment that will initially be employed for business analytics, Stahl says; in the future, however, the technology is expected to be used by the staff for alerts and real-time locating. As a physician, Stahl suspected that the medical clinics could be made more efficient, but he lacked sufficient data to enable the hospital to understand the systems, and how patients received their care. "People are complex," he states. "To understand the system behavior, you need to use a tool like RFID." The hospital wanted to be able to track not only patient flow at its clinics, but also where people come together, in order to learn how much time patients were spending one-on-one with physicians. With the RFID system, Stahl reports, they now have the infrastructure to begin studying how the clinics function.

Each physician is assigned a Radianse ID badge that can be pinned to a jacket or attached to a lanyard. The unique ID number encoded to the badge's battery-powered 433 MHz RFID tag is linked to the physician's name in the Radianse software. Radianse readers installed in the clinics' ceilings receive that ID number, transmitted by the tag at a rate of every 10 seconds. The readers, with a read range of approximately 30 feet, can pinpoint a tag's location within about 3 feet, using triangulation. Typically, at least three readers capture a tag's transmission at any given time. About 15 to 25 readers are installed at each site, based on a clinic's size, says Steve Schiefen, Radianse's president and CEO.


Steve Schiefen, Radianse's president and CEO
When a patient arrives at the clinic, he or she is registered and given a Radianse ID badge. The staff member first inputs information regarding the patient, then scans a bar code on the tag to link that individual with the ID number encoded to the badge's RFID tag. From that moment, the patient's whereabouts within the building can be tracked. The system stores data regarding where the patient goes, how long he or she remains in any particular location, and the length of time the person spends with clinical employees. At the end of his or her visit, the patient places the badge in a basket at the reception desk so that a subsequent patient can reuse it.

Workers could sign into the Radianse software to locate a specific patient in the facility at any given time, Stahl says, though at this stage, the system is being used for historic information—to determine what may be a bottleneck in the system, for instance. The clinic can also study the impact of any change in patient care that it might introduce. For example, if the center begins utilizing a new electronic medical records system, the Radianse data could be analyzed following that introduction, in order to determine how the new system affected patient flow.

http://www.rfidjournal.com/article/view/5324/2

Savi Receives $6.6 Million Order to Supply RFID Tracking Technologies from U.S. Department of Defense

Buffalo, New York 10/23/2009 02:25 AM GMT (TransWorldNews)


[I]
Lockheed Martin's (NYSE: LMT) business unit Savi, has been awarded orders totaling $6.6 million for standards based active Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking technologies and accompanying services under the U.S. Department of Defense's RFID procurement contract. The RFID tags, are attached to cargo containers and other supply chain assets enabling near real time supply visibility with allied defense force and organizations.


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About Lockheed Martin

Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin is a global security company that employs about 140,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services. The corporation reported 2008 sales of $42.7 billion.


http://www.transworldnews.com/NewsSt...storyid=132345



Ill do my best to update daily
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Old 25-10-2009, 10:06 PM   #2
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Default I posted this on another thread the other day

...I was at a trade show with seminars.....

Some RFID companies demonstrated a few things to me today.
This is the company that supplies the LCD screens for the UK Lotto that you see playing adverts on the checkouts in the coop or post office etc...

A bigger thing was talked about by 3 companies. This was RFID chips. These ID transmitters are in passports, Eurodollar notes, US dollar bills, bus passes, tokens, store loyalty cards, some Barclaycards, car keys etc... These are being used to track movements of shoppers in shopping centres and measure which shops they visit, how long they stay, and how long they spend in the building. Also, these are now being linked to telescreens which will be able to read your various RFID tags, and not only recognise previous encounters, but also guess the language you speak (such as by passport origin or resident permit info.) or see what event you have an RFID-containing ticket for when you are in an exhibition centre and then telescreens will tell you where to walk and show you a map of where to go to your event or show.

There is an Israeli company called Alchemy and they are making telescreens such as those you get on trains and buses etc. and they use the buses' CCTV to profile the people on the bus by gender, age range and race and then play 'targeted' adverts designed for them.

One company showed how the Israeli Estee Lauder company has RFID chips in the bottom of their products. When you pick one off the shop shelf (which contains a plate receiver), a telescreen will play an ad telling you what else to buy that compliments the product in your hand without you realising there is a connection.


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Old 25-10-2009, 10:15 PM   #3
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yes the ultimate agenda is to track our every move

this is around 2 weeks old but still quite new news

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Old 25-10-2009, 11:25 PM   #4
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Smug Mug adds RFID chip to coffee cup
A new take on wave-and-pay


20 October 2009 16:16 GMT / By Amy-Mae Elliott

In the States a college inventor has created an RFID-enabled coffee cup, allowing for wave-and-pay transactions in coffee houses without getting your wallet out.

While here in the UK NFC phones and RFID card systems have and are being trialled by both the London Underground and coffee shop type establishments, Chris Hallberg has taken a link out of the chain by adding the RFID chip directly to the cup.

The Smug Mug system will be in use sometime next year at a local Milwaukee coffee chain, Stone Creek Coffee, but Hallberg is hoping the concept might get picked up by larger companies looking to boost customer loyalty from time-pressed commuters.

The suggested price for the re-usable Smug Mug is $15, a price tag that include $5 credit for the relevant store.

http://www.pocket-lint.com/news/2807...led-coffee-cup
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Old 26-10-2009, 09:34 AM   #5
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a dentist near us has just had refurbishment.

on the sign outside it says dental and chip implants.now i noticed this a few weeks ago but didnt make the conection.as you sometimes dont walking around in a daze. this is in uk.

so just keep an eye out for little signs. dentist and obsure places. we already have chip and pin.and i know for certain that in japan they are already implementing cashless society in some parts. as the japanese are way ahead of us in technology and we dont get to here of some of the products out there until 3 or 4 years later. check out saturday 24th bbc click program.
the slow media intevention of brainwashing the public into accepting this crap.
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Old 26-10-2009, 12:14 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goldenbear View Post
a dentist near us has just had refurbishment.

on the sign outside it says dental and chip implants.now i noticed this a few weeks ago but didnt make the conection.as you sometimes dont walking around in a daze. this is in uk.

so just keep an eye out for little signs. dentist and obsure places. we already have chip and pin.and i know for certain that in japan they are already implementing cashless society in some parts. as the japanese are way ahead of us in technology and we dont get to here of some of the products out there until 3 or 4 years later. check out saturday 24th bbc click program.
the slow media intevention of brainwashing the public into accepting this crap.
ill keep my eyes out for them! there moving so fast i dont think it will be long before we have to have them..

when i see things like this video, i know it wont be long!

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Old 26-10-2009, 12:24 PM   #7
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Converging Technologies for 21st Century Security

25 November 2009: Royal College of Physicians, London, UK

Converging Technologies for 21st Century Security

Organised crime, terrorism, civil conflict, and natural disasters are sadly commonplace in global society and have developed increasingly complex dimensions. To counter such threats, civil security and emergency response teams are looking towards new technologies that offer more sensitive, rapid, and accurate detection methods; that provide the means to neutralise or effectively deal with the outcomes of such incidents; and that provide greater protection to personnel.

The Institute of Nanotechnology (IoN), through its role in the EU-funded observatoryNANO project, is investigating the role that nanotechnology and other technologies can play in addressing such complex security issues. The conference on 'Converging Technologies for 21st Century Security' brings experts from across the world to present their latest R&D in:

* detection of hazardous materials,
* responding to crisis events,
* protection measures for personnel and infrastructure,
* identification of personnel and goods.

This IoN conference is targeted towards governmental agencies, industrial groups, and technology start-ups with a keen interest in addressing security challenges.

http://www.nano.org.uk/
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Old 26-10-2009, 09:42 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goldenbear View Post
a dentist near us has just had refurbishment.

on the sign outside it says dental and chip implants.now i noticed this a few weeks ago but didnt make the conection.as you sometimes dont walking around in a daze. this is in uk.

so just keep an eye out for little signs. dentist and obsure places. we already have chip and pin.and i know for certain that in japan they are already implementing cashless society in some parts. as the japanese are way ahead of us in technology and we dont get to here of some of the products out there until 3 or 4 years later. check out saturday 24th bbc click program.
the slow media intevention of brainwashing the public into accepting this crap.
is it possible you take a shot of the dentist displaying that ad please?
would be fantastic visula proof to the non-believers!
tnx
Cleo
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Old 26-10-2009, 10:04 PM   #9
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Arrow

Pramari Launches Free Open-Source RFID Middleware

The Rifidi Edge Server can manage EPC Gen 2 RFID interrogators and RFID reader data, as well as information from bar-code scanners, sensors and other hardware.

http://www.rfidjournal.com/article/a...view/5328/1/1/
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Old 26-10-2009, 10:10 PM   #10
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[October 26, 2009]

Mobile Aspects Awarded Novation Contract for RFID Inventory Management Systems

PITTSBURGH --(Business Wire)-- Mobile Aspects, a leader in RFID enabled clinical process improvement systems, announced today that Novation, the health care contracting services company for VHA Inc., the University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC), and Provista, has awarded Mobile Aspects a three-year contract to supply radio frequency identification (RFID) inventory management systems to its member organizations.

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The contract covers several of Mobile Aspects leading-edge solutions including the iRISupply® supply automation system and the iRISecure™ tissue tracking technology. For clinicians in surgical specialty settings, the systems create a simple yet highly automated workflow to track and manage surgical inventory by leveraging the unique capabilities of RFID technology. In turn, tangible operational benefits are realized in areas such as improved charge capture, expiration management, and implant documentation.

"We are extremely pleased to have been awarded a contract from Novation and support their efforts to bring innovative, value-creating technologies to their member organizations," shared Bryan Christianson, Vice President of Marketing. "We look forward to helping VHA, UHC and Provista members leverage our RFID inventory management systems to create improved efficiency, increased profitability, and enhanced patient outcomes." About Novation Founded in 1998, Irving, Texas-based Novation is the leading health care contracting services company, delivering unmatched savings and value to nearly 2,500 members of VHA Inc. and the University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC), two national healthcare alliances, and nearly 12,000 members of Provista, LLC. Through its competitive contracting process, Novation develops and manages contracts with more than 500 suppliers. Novation offers the most extensive range of advanced contracting services, including: contract development, contract and supplier management, custom contracting, enhanced savings programs, online contract management and analytical tools, order management, and online supplier connectivity. VHA, UHC, and Provista members used Novation contracts to purchase more than $33.1 billion in 2007.
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Old 26-10-2009, 10:25 PM   #11
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Nanotechnology: Danger in Tiny Particles?

October 23, 2009, 1:40PM EST
Nanotechnology: Danger in Tiny Particles?
A widely-reported white paper in Germany about nanotechnology generated scary headlines, but the agency behind the report is more enthused than worried

By Christoph Seidler
Related Items


Breathless headlines about nanotechnology have ruffled feathers at Germany's Federal Environment Agency (UBA) this week. "Nanotechnology can make you sick," and "First official warning in Germany" about the dangers of nanotechnology, the headlines read. "The German Environment Agency warns against nanotechnology."


The maelstrom began earlier this week, when UBA specialists posted a 28-page paper about nanotechnology on their Web site—a move that prompted a very vocal response. But officials at the agency feel they have been misunderstood. They claim the posting is neither a warning nor a new study—it's just a background paper. "We haven't done any of our own research," UBA scientist Wolfgang Dubbert told SPIEGEL ONLINE. Dubbert is one of the authors of the paper, an updated version of a document published in 2006.

René Zimmer, an expert at the Independent Institute for Environmental Concerns (UfU), argues that the paper "really isn't new." He described it as a background paper that "is more or less a compilation of issues UBA had previously raised."

Extremely Small—and also Exciting

Nanotechnology, which is widely considered one of the most exciting technologies of the 21st century and, according to experts, will be worth trillions of euros globally by the year 2020, utilizes materials at an atomic or molecular level—nano literally means "extremely small" in Greek. Such materials now have many commercial and scientific applications—from providing extra UV protection and skin care in sun cream and cosmetics to helping clean graffiti off walls more efficiently to significantly advancing industry, health care and the military.

In fact, there are already countless products on the market that feature nano-technological innovations. They can be found in everything from sunscreen to ketchups and powdered sugar. They have also been used in enviromentally-friendly products such as a thermal-insulating paint.

Germany is one of the European leaders in this area. A report by Nanoforum, an online gateway for nanotechnology news funded by the European Community, reports that the German government support for the technology is strong and that, "between 1998 and 2004, the volume of projects funded in Germany quadrupled to around €120 million."

"We do not know how many products there are on the market that contain nano-particles," Wolfgang Dubbert a spokesperson for the UBA told German press agency DPA on Wednesday. And consumers can't really avoid them either. Apart from sunscreen, "the products on the shelves are not labeled" as containing nano-particles.

Still, Dubbert said he felt the discussion sparked after the update was heading in the wrong direction. "You can't just talk about the risks—you also have to look at the opportunities," the researcher said. UBA estimates that 800 German companies are currently active in the field of nanotechnology. The new government currently being formed between Chancellor Angela Merkel's conservatives and the business-friendly Free Democrats are considering making their support for the nascent industry a priority for the next administration.

Cautious Criticism

The paper, updated on Wednesday and named "Nanotechnology for Humans and the Environment: Increasing Chances, Minimizing Risks," certainly expresses plenty of reservations about nanotechnology. For example, the agency calls for a register of products that use nanotechnology as well as a recognizable consumer labelling indicating that a product contains nano-particles.

But the agency is cautious in its criticism and certainly not anything close to the near hysteria expressed by some respectable German newspapers. "In the opinion of many people in the industry, nanotechnology holds not only prospects for business, but also for improvements in environmental and health protection." They can also contribute to better efficiency. With the use of nanotechnology-optimized synthetics, the paper notes, the weight of cars and airplace could be reduced, thus helping save fuel.

And because of their particularly long lifespan and greater efficiency, nanotechnology-optimized LEDs could help conserve energy.

Part 2: 'Irrefutable Potential'

"Nanotechnology has considerable and irrefutable potential to provide environmental relief, some of which is already being applied now," UfU expert Zimmer said. But criticism that has been carefully formulated by the UBA researchers remains part of the public perception.

"Through the increasing use of synthetic nanomaterials, one must assume their increased entry into the environmental media, including the soil, water and air," the experts write in the paper. "Up to now there has been a partial lack of testing methods appropriate for determining the risks of nano materials and for ensuring monitoring." The paper also states that too little research has been conducted on health risks.

In the press release accompanying its backgrounder, the UBA said, "although nanotechnology offers significant potential for ecological product innovation, there is also risk for the environment and to human health. There are still some serious gaps in knowledge. This suggests that there are plenty of possibilities for research and regulation."

There are programs in Germany seeking to determine the safety of nanotechnologies, including the Nanocare program funded by the Federal Education and Research Ministry, which produced data for 11 different nanomaterials over the summer. A second phase of the project just began. There are also programs like Nanonature, which is studying the eco-toxilogical effects of nanotechnology. And the Dana program comprises of a database that will compile all the results collected in these research projects.

"I don't have the feeling that we're neglecting the risk issues," said researcher Zimmer. "They are being taken very seriously."

Calls for Mandatory Nanotech Labeling

But it could be years before these major research projects provide answers. For that reason, UBA's paper calls for a mandatory registration of products that contain nanotechnologies in order to "increase transparence." New EU directives require the registration of chemicals in products, and the same ought to be applied to nanoproducts, they argue. "So that people have the freedom of choice," the Federal Environmental Agency said, "we need to strive for a suitable labelling system that informs without suggesting a danger."

Germany's Green Party has welcomed the proposal. Party officials in parliament said nanotechnology presents a great economic opportunity, but warned the technology should only be used if the risks are recognized and controlled. The party called on the government to implement corresponding legislation. "Those who don't recognize and mitigate the risks are wasting the oppotunities these technologies represent," the party said in a statement. When asked about the prospects for labelling legislation, a spokesperson for the German Agricultural and Consumer Protection Ministry told SPIEGEL ONLINE: "Before we can introduce a register, we must first ensure there is no excessive bureaucratic complexity that would be a hindrance to doing business in Germany."

The debate over the UBA paper comes at the same time as a new report from Bonn University which indicates that the average German does not know enough about nanotechnology. Overall the thousand Germans polled by the university had a mostly positive impression of nanotechnology. "To them, nanotechnology appears to be a clever reproduction of what happens in nature anyway," Johannes Simons of the university told the GLP news agency. "Many consumers hope that nanotechnology might help to solve important problems in medicine or in the environment. Negative impressions—like those associated with genetics or nuclear energy, for example—are not the first thing that comes to mind."

Studies Show Dangers

Yet some studies have emerged that do appear to show nano-sized ingredients can be harmful. One, from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health in the United Kingdom, found that when mice inhaled carbon nano-tubes, they developed lung inflammations similar to those caused by asbestos. The lung inflammations did eventually subside. Another theory posits that nano-materials could have an impact on human DNA and more science-fiction-style scenarios involve the deadly military potential of items like the flexible amour and lightweight combat equipment being developed at Florida State University in the United States.

Generally, however, the feeling of most researchers has more to do with concern about lack of information on the subject, rather than outright fear and loathing. A balanced approach is required, they say.

For example, the authors of the study on the mice with inflamed lungs called for more transparency in the nanotechnology industry. In the recent past both the National Research Council in the US and the Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution in the UK have called for more research into the potential impacts of nanotechnology. Additionally the European Parliament has called for clearer regulations and policy on the issue—though positions vary. While departments for environment and health want further precautions and would like to see mandatory labelling and a register of nanotech materials, the EU's departments for enterprise and industry prefer less specific legislation and fewer barriers to trade.

http://www.businessweek.com/globalbi...023_713145.htm
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Old 26-10-2009, 11:26 PM   #12
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April 2008 video
- by the programmer Patrick Dixon

Last edited by musten; 26-10-2009 at 11:27 PM.
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Old 27-10-2009, 07:50 AM   #13
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chill out people...

Does anyone know what a kernel is??? And that isn't kernel sanders...

My friend is a computer whizz kid; runs os10 on his pc's: High level stuff.

He says that when the chip first came out, a 12 yr old kid hacked the chip in less than a minute..and the latest one takes less than 2..

peace x
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Old 27-10-2009, 09:55 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goldenbear View Post
a dentist near us has just had refurbishment.

on the sign outside it says dental and chip implants.now i noticed this a few weeks ago but didnt make the conection.as you sometimes dont walking around in a daze. this is in uk.

so just keep an eye out for little signs. dentist and obsure places. we already have chip and pin.and i know for certain that in japan they are already implementing cashless society in some parts. as the japanese are way ahead of us in technology and we dont get to here of some of the products out there until 3 or 4 years later. check out saturday 24th bbc click program.
the slow media intevention of brainwashing the public into accepting this crap.
I mentioned the dentist angle for the RFID a few threads back, one of the easiest ways to get a chip into something would be to place one in every item of clothing IE shoes, something that you will have on your person every day, especially treasured ones.

I bet its already being done, when you pay for your item the cashier scans the product which automatically enters all your details from your credit card onto the chip inside the product.

Our military will already have something inside them, I used to be a medic in the army and there are many different ways you could administer a chip without them knowing, I bet you its already everywhere right now.

Its a mad mad world.

Last edited by rollotomaz1; 27-10-2009 at 10:00 AM.
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Old 27-10-2009, 10:18 AM   #15
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Mobile Aspects to supply RFID inventory management systems for health care organizations
27. October 2009 04:28

Mobile Aspects, a leader in RFID enabled clinical process improvement systems, announced today that Novation, the health care contracting services company for VHA Inc., the University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC), and Provista, has awarded Mobile Aspects a three-year contract to supply radio frequency identification (RFID) inventory management systems to its member organizations.

The contract covers several of Mobile Aspects leading-edge solutions including the iRISupply® supply automation system and the iRISecure™ tissue tracking technology. For clinicians in surgical specialty settings, the systems create a simple yet highly automated workflow to track and manage surgical inventory by leveraging the unique capabilities of RFID technology. In turn, tangible operational benefits are realized in areas such as improved charge capture, expiration management, and implant documentation.

"We are extremely pleased to have been awarded a contract from Novation and support their efforts to bring innovative, value-creating technologies to their member organizations," shared Bryan Christianson, Vice President of Marketing. "We look forward to helping VHA, UHC and Provista members leverage our RFID inventory management systems to create improved efficiency, increased profitability, and enhanced patient outcomes.”

http://www.news-medical.net/news/200...nizations.aspx
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Old 27-10-2009, 05:46 PM   #16
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Technology can be very helpful but when in the wrong hands can be a violation of human rights and deadly.

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Old 27-10-2009, 06:11 PM   #17
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Remotely activated CYANIDE inside NEW implantable RFID GPS tracking CHIPS !!!
Posted May 29th, 2009 by MMJ Ministry

Remotely releasable CYANIDE inside NEW implantable GPS tracking RFID CHIPS !!!
Fox & CNBC

The INFOWARRIOR with Jason Bermas: cyanide poison inside RFID implantable microchips = ultimate control killer chip

HD FOX NEWS Version: Cyanide-equipped RFID chip! Patent Denied in Germany
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Old 27-10-2009, 06:37 PM   #18
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Metro Details Some of Its RFID Successes

Speaking at RFID Journal LIVE! Europe 2009, Gerd Wolfram, head of the retailer's CIO office, provided metrics on how EPC RFID technology is improving its operations.

By Mark Roberti

Oct. 27, 2009—Metro Group has been steadily expanding its use of radio frequency identification based on Electronic Product Code (EPC) standards since 2006. Last week, at RFID Journal LIVE! Europe, Gerd Wolfram, head of the company's CIO office, spelled out some of the benefits the retail giant has seen since implementing the technology.

One application for which Metro utilizes RFID is receiving pallets of goods into inventory. Wolfram said his company tracks approximately 3 million pallets annually in Europe, and that there has been a "significant reduction of shipping mistakes and resulting compensation claims," a 15 percent decrease in the time it takes to unload trucks and a 50 percent drop in the amount of time required to verify that the correct items have been delivered. "RFID is not just enhancing efficiency," he told attendees. "It is also providing better data quality."

Another application is tracking promotional displays at Metro's Real hypermarket chain, where promotions account for 23 percent of the store's total sales volume. The information provided by the RFID system, Wolfram said, shows that sales are 54 percent higher if a promotional display is on the sales floor at the proper moment, when Metro or the manufacturer is advertising it. "With RFID," he stated, "we can ensure that the right product is in the right place at the right time."

Metro has also been testing RFID's ability to track meat stored in refrigerated displays at its Future Store (see At Metro's New Future Store, RFID Helps Assure Meat Quality). The system automatically tracks trays of meat within the refrigerated units, and informs butchers when they need to replenish a specific cut. The system significantly reduces out-of-stocks, Wolfram indicated, and by enabling more precise demand forecasting and real-time sales intelligence, it also decreases the incidence of write-downs by 25 percent. However, he added, tag cost still makes it too expensive to roll the application out to all of the company's stores, and the savings from reduced write-downs does not yet cover the expense of tagging the meat.

Metro has also been tracking goods tagged in Asia and shipped to Europe, beginning in 2006 (see Metro Group Expands RFID Pilot in Asia). Now, Wolfram said, the company could analyze its suppliers' ability to ship goods on time. He showed a chart that chronicled shipments from Hong Kong. Nearly two-thirds of the shipments, he said, were more than 5 days too late, while approximately 2 percent arrived too early. Having this data enables Metro to work with its suppliers to improve their performance.

One of Metro's next projects will be to test RFID's ability to reduce shrinkage. To that end, the retailer is currently working with Checkpoint Systems to deploy a system based on GS1 EPCglobal's recently announced guidelines for employing RFID in anti-theft applications (see GS1 Releases Guidelines for RFID-based Electronic Article Surveillance).

Wolfram reaffirmed that Metro is utilizing EPC RFID technologies to more efficiently respond to customer demands, by making its business processes leaner and more efficient, and by leveraging the additional data its RFID systems provide to manage the company more effectively.

http://www.rfidjournal.com/article/a...view/5332/1/1/
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Old 27-10-2009, 07:41 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wakeup2nwo View Post
Technology can be very helpful but when in the wrong hands can be a violation of human rights and deadly.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UZL0ONSADbY&feature=sub
Well I'll go to the foot of our stairs, I ask you what they hell is wrong with good old common scense and an imagination, and pen to paper .

I can tell you from experience that this technology gets things wrong, IE, we had our dog chipped after it ran off once, same thing happened a while later, after 24 hours we statrted checking around the dog warden etc and kennels and nothing.

So we started looking a bit deeper, explaining what time description of the dog etc, low and behold we found here, but the chip data was wrong and they brought it back to the wrong address, our next door neighbour who didn't understand what the chitty was all about because he never had a dog before etc,

By the time we found her there was a huge bill to pay overnight stay etc, what a load of fecking crap, absolutely a waste of time and money, and if its not right no one will be looking for anyone, too risky to hqve such a system.
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Old 27-10-2009, 08:06 PM   #20
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