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Old 15-01-2012, 01:15 PM   #41
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This is so interesting. I have always found jogging makes my body feel terrible and I hate doing it.
I totally agree diet is the most important thing followed then by physical training.
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Old 15-01-2012, 02:06 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by domathy View Post
I am so lucky to live where i do. I walk in the local woods at 6am when its pitch dark and no people around. Can hear owls and the other birds singing at the start of a new day. Plus, there is an industrial estate at the fringes of the woods and one of the factories have created a kind of deer sanctuary and sometimes as I approach the woods there will be maybe 50-100 deer just milling around beside the road. Th other day about 20 of them ran across the road which was quite a site.

As you say, time is a constraint for most people, but i just get up early and walk at 6am. Though if i lived in a major city I must be honest that I wouldnt be so inspired to get up early as youre more likely to encounter crack heads and people drunk on beer, instead of a herd of deer.
Yup, I am lucky too. I live in one of the large forests in the UK and this is the view from my back door.



I wouldn't be going out for walks on my own if I still lived in a city!

Incidentally I got my sick kidney removed and I feel better than I have done for years - literally. It was open surgery and the only exercise I can do for 6 weeks is walking. The surgeon said he likes people to walk as much as possible during recovering to prevent blood clots, pneumonia (because of where the incision is) and to prevent atrophy of the abdominal muscles.

They got me up the day after the operation to walk up and down the ward and to the loo etc. The day after that I made myself walk around a little more so they would let me home quicker. So on the third day as I was walking, eating, drinking and peeing they gave me the all clear to go home. I kept walking and recovery has gone extremely well. The resilliance of the human body is amazing!
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Old 15-01-2012, 02:20 PM   #43
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Why Exercise Won't Make You Thin

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I have exercised like this — obsessively, a bit grimly — for years, but recently I began to wonder: Why am I doing this? Except for a two-year period at the end of an unhappy relationship — a period when I self-medicated with lots of Italian desserts — I have never been overweight.
The exercise industry is just another way of skimming us, it goes together with the healthy lifestyle industry. There are lots of bullshit myths that need to be exposed here.

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It's a question many of us could ask. More than 45 million Americans now belong to a health club, up from 23 million in 1993. We spend some $19 billion a year on gym memberships. Of course, some people join and never go. Still, as one major study — the Minnesota Heart Survey — found, more of us at least say we exercise regularly. The survey ran from 1980, when only 47% of respondents said they engaged in regular exercise, to 2000, when the figure had grown to 57%.
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And yet obesity figures have risen dramatically in the same period: a third of Americans are obese, and another third count as overweight by the Federal Government's definition.
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Fundamentally, humans are not a species that evolved to dispose of many extra calories beyond what we need to live. Rats, among other species, have a far greater capacity to cope with excess calories than we do because they have more of a dark-colored tissue called brown fat. Brown fat helps produce a protein that switches off little cellular units called mitochondria, which are the cells' power plants: they help turn nutrients into energy. When they're switched off, animals don't get an energy boost. Instead, the animals literally get warmer. And as their temperature rises, calories burn effortlessly.
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Could pushing people to exercise more actually be contributing to our obesity problem? In some respects, yes. Because exercise depletes not just the body's muscles but the brain's self-control "muscle" as well, many of us will feel greater entitlement to eat a bag of chips during that lazy time after we get back from the gym

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Old 15-01-2012, 03:02 PM   #44
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Originally Posted by gracist View Post
This is so interesting. I have always found jogging makes my body feel terrible and I hate doing it.
I totally agree diet is the most important thing followed then by physical training.
You should not feel terrible when you exert energy and your right your food comes first and then the energy for running or any physical task can be done. You should analyze what makes you feel terrible and then fix that is it your joints (maybe overweight)or lungs (maybe smoking) whatever it is analyze what goes into your mouth that is the cause of you feeling terrible when you run. It is a test or a gauge of how your body is reacting to outputs of more extreme energy. If you don't need to run just for the sake of running don't run if makes you feel bad. Whatever you put in that's how much will come out. If I'm sitting in front of this computer all day how much energy do I need? I can still be healthy but I better watch what I eat because now overeating is very subtle and be for you know it I will be over weight with health problems.
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Old 15-01-2012, 04:07 PM   #45
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Originally Posted by ormus View Post
You should not feel terrible when you exert energy and your right your food comes first and then the energy for running or any physical task can be done. You should analyze what makes you feel terrible and then fix that is it your joints (maybe overweight)or lungs (maybe smoking) whatever it is analyze what goes into your mouth that is the cause of you feeling terrible when you run. It is a test or a gauge of how your body is reacting to outputs of more extreme energy. If you don't need to run just for the sake of running don't run if makes you feel bad. Whatever you put in that's how much will come out. If I'm sitting in front of this computer all day how much energy do I need? I can still be healthy but I better watch what I eat because now overeating is very subtle and be for you know it I will be over weight with health problems.
I feel REALLY good when I exert energy, just not by jogging. Sprinting is good, walking I love and lifting weights or doing HIIT are my favorite.

My diet is the best its ever been: raw milk and meat from grassfed cows, etc
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Old 15-01-2012, 04:11 PM   #46
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I agree with OP. I was honestly hoping somebody would start a thread like this. I myself hate running/jogging long distances for long periods of time.

I didn't read any of the replies yet, so I apologize if this has been mentioned before.

I posted this video before in another thread, but it seems relevant to this topic as well (I hope it shows... somebody please quote to show vid):

1 minute vid:

I feel there is a difference between running and sprinting. When I run/jog, I feel horrible. Maybe it's my lack of jogging technique, but something about running for long periods of time seems unhealthy.

However, once I increase my intensity and go for an all-out sprint for 15-20 seconds, my body mechanics change, and running feels more natural; not only from a technique/body mechanics stand point, but also in terms of what energy systems are being used.

That being said, anaerobic activity seems so much more healthier and more natural for me (sprinting, weight training, strongman training, etc).

However, I also enjoy very long walks; it's very meditative for me.

also:

The marathon runner vs Sprinter

I like to put running/jogging and sprinting into two completely different categories, even though both movements look the same. I don't know why I feel this way, but it's just the way I think it is.

In my opinion
If you want to be healthy, get stronger, build muscle! - whether through weight training, gymnastics, crossfit, farm work, or whatever.

Last edited by macchoi; 15-01-2012 at 04:41 PM.
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Old 15-01-2012, 05:35 PM   #47
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Oh ok i think know what you guys are talking about feeling uncomfortable when you jog your right side hurts that's very common.
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Old 15-01-2012, 08:01 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by lesleypumpshaft View Post
Yup, I am lucky too. I live in one of the large forests in the UK and this is the view from my back door.



I wouldn't be going out for walks on my own if I still lived in a city!

Incidentally I got my sick kidney removed and I feel better than I have done for years - literally. It was open surgery and the only exercise I can do for 6 weeks is walking. The surgeon said he likes people to walk as much as possible during recovering to prevent blood clots, pneumonia (because of where the incision is) and to prevent atrophy of the abdominal muscles.

They got me up the day after the operation to walk up and down the ward and to the loo etc. The day after that I made myself walk around a little more so they would let me home quicker. So on the third day as I was walking, eating, drinking and peeing they gave me the all clear to go home. I kept walking and recovery has gone extremely well. The resilliance of the human body is amazing!
that looks beautiful where you live!

Im happy to hear you dumped the duff kidney and feel so much better for it, and wish you a speedy recovery

Did the doctor say if 'horizontal jogging' is allowed

Last edited by domathy; 15-01-2012 at 08:02 PM.
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Old 15-01-2012, 08:04 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by macchoi View Post
I agree with OP. I was honestly hoping somebody would start a thread like this. I myself hate running/jogging long distances for long periods of time.

I didn't read any of the replies yet, so I apologize if this has been mentioned before.

I posted this video before in another thread, but it seems relevant to this topic as well (I hope it shows... somebody please quote to show vid):

1 minute vid:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7vLqK0UJfT8

I feel there is a difference between running and sprinting. When I run/jog, I feel horrible. Maybe it's my lack of jogging technique, but something about running for long periods of time seems unhealthy.

However, once I increase my intensity and go for an all-out sprint for 15-20 seconds, my body mechanics change, and running feels more natural; not only from a technique/body mechanics stand point, but also in terms of what energy systems are being used.

That being said, anaerobic activity seems so much more healthier and more natural for me (sprinting, weight training, strongman training, etc).

However, I also enjoy very long walks; it's very meditative for me.

also:

The marathon runner vs Sprinter

I like to put running/jogging and sprinting into two completely different categories, even though both movements look the same. I don't know why I feel this way, but it's just the way I think it is.

In my opinion
If you want to be healthy, get stronger, build muscle! - whether through weight training, gymnastics, crossfit, farm work, or whatever.
You shouldnt equate health with big muscles. You can have huge muscles and weak organs. Needs to be a hoistic approach if discussing health.
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Old 15-01-2012, 08:27 PM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by macchoi View Post
I agree with OP. I was honestly hoping somebody would start a thread like this. I myself hate running/jogging long distances for long periods of time.

I didn't read any of the replies yet, so I apologize if this has been mentioned before.

I posted this video before in another thread, but it seems relevant to this topic as well (I hope it shows... somebody please quote to show vid):

1 minute vid:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7vLqK0UJfT8

I feel there is a difference between running and sprinting. When I run/jog, I feel horrible. Maybe it's my lack of jogging technique, but something about running for long periods of time seems unhealthy.

However, once I increase my intensity and go for an all-out sprint for 15-20 seconds, my body mechanics change, and running feels more natural; not only from a technique/body mechanics stand point, but also in terms of what energy systems are being used.

That being said, anaerobic activity seems so much more healthier and more natural for me (sprinting, weight training, strongman training, etc).

However, I also enjoy very long walks; it's very meditative for me.

also:

The marathon runner vs Sprinter

I like to put running/jogging and sprinting into two completely different categories, even though both movements look the same. I don't know why I feel this way, but it's just the way I think it is.

In my opinion
If you want to be healthy, get stronger, build muscle! - whether through weight training, gymnastics, crossfit, farm work, or whatever.
sprinters use a lot of anabolics, that picture doesn't prove much.You can't be a professional athlete these days without steroids, it's how the sports work nowdays
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Last edited by saty; 15-01-2012 at 08:28 PM.
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Old 15-01-2012, 09:26 PM   #51
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Originally Posted by domathy View Post
that looks beautiful where you live!

Im happy to hear you dumped the duff kidney and feel so much better for it, and wish you a speedy recovery

Did the doctor say if 'horizontal jogging' is allowed
It is pretty lush round here

I've got a week to go before I can start doing more strenuous things although I was naughty and went to Jujutsu yesterday and did some light training with my bokken. Tbh I feel like I could do more but I'll wait to get the all clear from my surgeon at my 6 week check up.

Horizontal jogging is fine
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Old 15-01-2012, 10:08 PM   #52
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This is a great thread. There's been lots of divergent points of view, all listened to respectfully, with intelligent responses.

Congrats on your continuing recovery Leslypumpshaft.
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Old 16-01-2012, 12:03 AM   #53
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Originally Posted by macchoi View Post
I agree with OP. I was honestly hoping somebody would start a thread like this. I myself hate running/jogging long distances for long periods of time.

I didn't read any of the replies yet, so I apologize if this has been mentioned before.

I posted this video before in another thread, but it seems relevant to this topic as well (I hope it shows... somebody please quote to show vid):

1 minute vid:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7vLqK0UJfT8

I feel there is a difference between running and sprinting. When I run/jog, I feel horrible. Maybe it's my lack of jogging technique, but something about running for long periods of time seems unhealthy.

However, once I increase my intensity and go for an all-out sprint for 15-20 seconds, my body mechanics change, and running feels more natural; not only from a technique/body mechanics stand point, but also in terms of what energy systems are being used.

That being said, anaerobic activity seems so much more healthier and more natural for me (sprinting, weight training, strongman training, etc).

However, I also enjoy very long walks; it's very meditative for me.

also:

The marathon runner vs Sprinter

I like to put running/jogging and sprinting into two completely different categories, even though both movements look the same. I don't know why I feel this way, but it's just the way I think it is.

In my opinion
If you want to be healthy, get stronger, build muscle! - whether through weight training, gymnastics, crossfit, farm work, or whatever.
It be interesting to see how fast these long distance runners can do in a 100m dash.
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Old 16-01-2012, 12:38 AM   #54
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It be interesting to see how fast these long distance runners can do in a 100m dash.
They would be exceedingly slow. No anaerobic strength whatsoever.
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Old 16-01-2012, 01:28 AM   #55
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They would be exceedingly slow. No anaerobic strength whatsoever.
I see what you mean, but I'm tending to disagree.

Though, just a training video. It shows some long distance runners do incorporate 'sprinting/interval' in their training programmes:
In one respect I would say a long distance runner do reach close to or at anaerobic zones, during their run/towards the end. But it does varie on a lot of things on the day, such as how the person feels, times, terrain, distance and so forth for him to calculate when to expend more energy or not, that he has saved.

I would agree that poor/good LDR would not beat a good sprinter (U-Bolt is out of the question), but they might come close to a poor sprinter 'maybe' just a thought in mind.

Last edited by Shiyoken; 16-01-2012 at 01:30 AM.
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Old 16-01-2012, 02:20 AM   #56
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They would be exceedingly slow. No anaerobic strength whatsoever.
This post and this thread are such a joke. You don't think an elite marathoner has any anaerobic strength? Lets put it this way: You have no idea the caliber of athletes that you are diminishing. Maybe the vast majority of recreational hobbyjoggers wouldn't fare very well in a 100m dash, but they're not very good athletes to begin with. You really don't think this guy has any strength? This is the best distance runner the world has ever known, Kenenisa Bekele.


Not only is he a tremendous athlete, he demolishes the notion that distance runners don't have "anaerobic strength". Do you realize that in his 5000m world record, he averaged 4:02 pace PER MILE for 3.1 miles? Most people can't even run 1/16th of ONE MILE at that pace. So please, think or at least do a little bit of research before posting such ignorance.
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Old 16-01-2012, 03:27 AM   #57
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This post and this thread are such a joke. You don't think an elite marathoner has any anaerobic strength? Lets put it this way: You have no idea the caliber of athletes that you are diminishing. Maybe the vast majority of recreational hobbyjoggers wouldn't fare very well in a 100m dash, but they're not very good athletes to begin with. You really don't think this guy has any strength? This is the best distance runner the world has ever known, Kenenisa Bekele.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TRCB-wrPIUY

Not only is he a tremendous athlete, he demolishes the notion that distance runners don't have "anaerobic strength". Do you realize that in his 5000m world record, he averaged 4:02 pace PER MILE for 3.1 miles? Most people can't even run 1/16th of ONE MILE at that pace. So please, think or at least do a little bit of research before posting such ignorance.

I don't think you know what anaerobic strength is. How much do you think he can squat? It's a fact of training that aerobic endurance and anaerobic strength are mutually exclusive. Don't embarrass yourself with aggressive ignorance.

Last edited by supertzar; 16-01-2012 at 03:30 AM.
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Old 16-01-2012, 03:51 AM   #58
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I see what you mean, but I'm tending to disagree.

Though, just a training video. It shows some long distance runners do incorporate 'sprinting/interval' in their training programmes: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=heOJOQJ3RyM

In one respect I would say a long distance runner do reach close to or at anaerobic zones, during their run/towards the end. But it does varie on a lot of things on the day, such as how the person feels, times, terrain, distance and so forth for him to calculate when to expend more energy or not, that he has saved.

I would agree that poor/good LDR would not beat a good sprinter (U-Bolt is out of the question), but they might come close to a poor sprinter 'maybe' just a thought in mind.
I understand when they deplete all their carbs they go into the anaerobic pathway. That's not strength though. Anaerobic strength excercises are of short duration by definition; strength output decreases dramatically in seconds as the ATP in the muscles is depleted. Think of explosive activities like weightlifting. If the lift isn't completed in a matter of seconds it can never be completed. The lifter will have to rest for some minutes to make another attempt.
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Old 16-01-2012, 10:33 AM   #59
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Originally Posted by arthurlydiard View Post
This post and this thread are such a joke. You don't think an elite marathoner has any anaerobic strength? Lets put it this way: You have no idea the caliber of athletes that you are diminishing. Maybe the vast majority of recreational hobbyjoggers wouldn't fare very well in a 100m dash, but they're not very good athletes to begin with. You really don't think this guy has any strength? This is the best distance runner the world has ever known, Kenenisa Bekele.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TRCB-wrPIUY

Not only is he a tremendous athlete, he demolishes the notion that distance runners don't have "anaerobic strength". Do you realize that in his 5000m world record, he averaged 4:02 pace PER MILE for 3.1 miles? Most people can't even run 1/16th of ONE MILE at that pace. So please, think or at least do a little bit of research before posting such ignorance.
The long distance runner are athletes who have developed their will muscle to an extreme, that does not mean that running is natural for the rest of us/

People are very stubborn creatures and can achieve amazing results in many areas, what we talk about here in this "joke" thread is the situation in general for the average person.

There are people that can hold their breath under water for 20 minutes. Does that mean it is natural?

The joke is on you!

Last edited by plam; 16-01-2012 at 10:36 AM.
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Old 16-01-2012, 12:55 PM   #60
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Originally Posted by plam View Post
The long distance runner are athletes who have developed their will muscle to an extreme, that does not mean that running is natural for the rest of us/

People are very stubborn creatures and can achieve amazing results in many areas, what we talk about here in this "joke" thread is the situation in general for the average person.

There are people that can hold their breath under water for 20 minutes. Does that mean it is natural?

The joke is on you!
True. And similarly, when you look at the human intetinal tract it becomes clear that humans were not 'designed' to eat meat But us humans can do anything if we exercise that will muscle and put our minds to it

Holding breath under water, flying planes, running for no good reason.....whatever turns you on. Sooner we revert back to apes the better - then we will all know what were supposed to do and we can get on with climbing trees.
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