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Old 02-07-2012, 03:37 AM   #1
edostar
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Default Hydrocarbon Crack System.

I was asked to start this thread after contributing slightly off-topic comments to the Hydrogen As Fuel thread in the same forum.
That thread is discussing HHO technology (electrolyzing Brown's Gas from water) as a valuable fuel supplement to internal combustion engines (ICEs).

The hydrogen burns faster and cleaner than petrol/air mixture and expands faster in the burn chamber which makes the power stroke more efficient.
It also gives cleaner exhaust emissions on account of the more complete burn.

The problem with cracking Hydrogen from water is that it takes energy from the engine to run the alternator constantly which all but cancels out the gains from the hydrogen.

The advantage of HCS is that it takes nothing from the engine at all and so all gains are pure gains.

Hydrocarbon Crack System (HCS).

This is a simple, home-made system that can be added to any engine in an afternoon by anyone with minimal engine maintenance skills.
It uses cheap parts that are readily available and easily bought at local stores.
It will increase the efficiency of your engine resulting in more power and torque, reduced engine noise and vibration and reduced exhaust emissions.
You should also experience at least 20% mileage increase.

Basically; it produces Hydrogen on Demand from regular petrol (gasoline) by cracking Hydrogen from Hydrocarbon vapour using heat alone.
Here is a schematic of the system:




As you can see; vapour from an auxiliary bubbler tank (half filled with petrol) flows through a rubber pipe into a ‘heat tube’ where it is heated to about 300 degrees Celsius by the hottest part of the exhaust pipe.
This cracks the hydrocarbon molecules into Hydrogen and Carbon which flows on to the air inlet of the engine.
It mixes with the regular fuel/air and greatly increases the burn-efficiency of the engine.

PCV.(positive crankcase ventilation)
All four stroke engines leak air/fuel mixture past the piston rings into the crankcase.
This is known as ‘blow-by’ and needs to be ventilated (usually to the air filter where it finds its way back into the burn chamber).
PCV flows out of the crankcase with sufficient pressure to operate the Hydrocarbon Crack System and is ideal for our purposes for the following reasons:

a. It varies in pressure depending on engine speed.
This means that the faster the engine speed; the more Hydrogen is delivered to the burn chamber.

b. Its destination is the burn chamber anyway so all we are doing is borrowing its variable pressure to operate the HCS.

c. It is warm and so helps evaporate the petrol as it flows through the auxiliary bubbler tank.

PCV pressure is generally more than enough to operate the HCS and so we ventilate it via a screw valve before it reaches the bubbler tank.
If the ventilation screw is closed completely; too much PCV pressure will reach the bubbler tank.
If the ventilation screw is opened wide; little or no PCV pressure will reach the bubbler tank.
An ideal adjustment gives minimal bubbling at engine idle.
Aquarium stores sell plastic screw valves very cheaply.

A radiator overflow tank makes an ideal bubbler and can be purchased at minimal cost from any auto-parts store.
They also sell the rubber fuel pipe that is used to connect the various parts of the system.
The 3mm bore copper piping (usually used for brake lines) can also be purchased there.

Locate the fuel bubbler anywhere handy for refilling and connecting to the rest of the system.
Wind the copper tubing at least three times around the hottest part of the exhaust pipe (closest to the engine block).
Allow about 6 inches (15 cm) copper pipe leading into and out of the coil so that the rubber connection pipe is not too close to the exhaust pipe.

The rubber pipe carrying the Hydrogen can be fed directly into the air filter.

This system gives similar results to the better known HHO system (or Hydrogen Booster) but it has significant advantages.
HHO requires electrical current in order to crack Hydrogen and Oxygen from water and this places a constant drain on the engine.
HCS places no such burden on the engine and takes nothing from the engine that wasn’t to be discarded anyway.
In addition to this; the ‘Brown’s Gas’ produced by the HHO system is highly explosive whereas the Hydrogen produced by the HCS contains virtually no oxygen and is therefore much safer.

Last edited by edostar; 02-07-2012 at 03:40 AM.
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Old 02-07-2012, 07:43 AM   #2
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Default Honda CB200 HCS Installation.

Honda CB200 HCS Installation.

This is a rough installation on an old Honda 200cc single (1994) that is still running very well.
The cylinder was recently re-bored to +75 and a new piston and rings were fitted.

The HCS was installed prior to the rebuild and was the first time I’d tried the PCV pressure system which was simple to fit and worked well.

The bubbler tank position is rather ugly and I intend to change its location but it is ideal for demonstrating the simplicity of the system in these photos.


This is the copper pipe wound a couple of times around the hottest part of the exhaust pipe.
The end of the winding at its top left receives the fuel vapour from the bubbler tank whose outlet is just visible on the near corner of the tank.
The end of the winding poking downwards takes the Hydrogen to the air filter box.


Here we can see the PCV pipe ventilating the gases from the top of the crankcase just behind the starter motor mid-right in the photo.
The PCV pipe is connected to a ‘T’ joint with one arm going to the bubbler tank feed (running horizontally across the photo) and the other going to the yellow screw valve which ventilates the surplus gases to the environment (more environmentally friendly would be to feed the surplus to the air filter).

The PCV gases used by the HCS are fed into the top of the bubbler tank (mid-left of the photo) and bubble through the fuel.
This results in a build-up of fuel vapour in the upper part of the tank which flows into the copper heat tube wound around the exhaust pipe.

The yellow screw valve is adjusted to provide minimal bubbling at engine idle.
As the RPM increase; so does the quantity of PCV gases flowing through the system providing increased Hydrogen entering the burn chamber.

The Hydrogen enhances the combustion and provides a valuable Expansion Medium.
The net result is more power, less vibration, engine noise and exhaust emissions.

This is how HCS improves the running efficiency of internal combustion engines; reducing the rate at which they squander valuable fuel and leaving the environment cleaner.
The exhaust fumes are virtually invisible and emit very little odour.

Update:
I mentioned that I intended to change the rather ugly bubbler tank position and I did so earlier this morning.
I removed the standard air filter box and replaced it with a little air filter pod which is much smaller.
As a result; there is ample space beneath the saddle for the bubbler tank and the whole installation is much tidier.


The bubbler tank now sits between the two rear frame supports and is secured in place with copper wire.
I need to remove the nearside inspection panel in order to refill the bubbler tank which is a simple operation.

I drilled a hole in the rear plate of the filter pod and inserted a copper pipe sealed in a section of rubber tube (visible top centre in the photo).


A much neater job I’m sure you’ll agree.
It’s still an 18-year-old Japanese bike but it goes very well now after its engine service and re-vamped HCS.
From the outside; the only clue that it is running HCS at all is the small copper heat tube wound around the exhaust pipe just in front of the cylinder block.



Dan.
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Old 02-07-2012, 11:37 PM   #3
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Are you sure its hydrogen giving the extra mpg..not just the extra fuel in the bubbler?

I Wonder what would happen applied to a diesel?

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Old 03-07-2012, 12:58 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by h2pogo View Post
Are you sure its hydrogen giving the extra mpg..not just the extra fuel in the bubbler?

I Wonder what would happen applied to a diesel?
One of two things is happening. Either the fuel is entering the combustion cycle as highly vaporized fuel, or the fuel is thermally decomposing and entering the combustion cycle as hydrogen and carbon. I haven't found data on the thermal decomposition temperatures for the various chemicals in "gasoline," still looking for that. One concern I've read while researching this topic elsewhere is the formation of soot, raw carbon, which can have the effect of gunking up systems.

The amount of the fuel in the tank is very low. What is the consumption rate of the fuel in the bubbler tank?

Because it is being bubbled by the crank case exhaust gasses, some amount of fuel vapor is going but also some amount of carbon monoxide and other exhaust + vapors from the hot motor oil.

I'm intrigued by this system and may have to cobble together one for my '72 Ford truck, the only vehicle I own with a carb. I'd like to capture the vapors and see what they are, in particular.
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Old 03-07-2012, 04:18 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by h2pogo View Post
Are you sure its hydrogen giving the extra mpg..not just the extra fuel in the bubbler?

I Wonder what would happen applied to a diesel?
I'm certain it's Hydrogen that is going into the burn chamber for the following reasons.
It gives the same response that HHO gives (smoother, quieter run to the engine) and in the case of HCS; greater power as it takes nothing from the engine to produce the Hydrogen.
Also; when running the vehicle with a cold engine (starting it cold and driving it off) it begins by running a bit lumpy (because just fuel vapour is being added to the inlet) but as soon as the heat-tube reaches the required threshold to crack the fuel; the response immediately changes and it runs smooth, quiet and with greater power (because the hydrocarbon vapour is being cracked into Hydrogen and Carbon).
If it was just gaining fuel vapour; it would run pretty much the same at all temperatures with no obvious threshold.

As for diesel engines; I haven't tried it myself but I hear that Hydrogen is as beneficial to diesels as it is to gasoline engines.
This would make sense as the 'expansion medium' factor is applicable to all ICEs.

Last edited by edostar; 03-07-2012 at 04:59 AM.
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Old 03-07-2012, 04:33 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by apollo_gnomon View Post
One of two things is happening. Either the fuel is entering the combustion cycle as highly vaporized fuel, or the fuel is thermally decomposing and entering the combustion cycle as hydrogen and carbon. I haven't found data on the thermal decomposition temperatures for the various chemicals in "gasoline," still looking for that. One concern I've read while researching this topic elsewhere is the formation of soot, raw carbon, which can have the effect of gunking up systems.

The amount of the fuel in the tank is very low. What is the consumption rate of the fuel in the bubbler tank?

Because it is being bubbled by the crank case exhaust gasses, some amount of fuel vapor is going but also some amount of carbon monoxide and other exhaust + vapors from the hot motor oil.

I'm intrigued by this system and may have to cobble together one for my '72 Ford truck, the only vehicle I own with a carb. I'd like to capture the vapors and see what they are, in particular.
This system was developed by an Indonesian who read a US Patent document that described creating Hydrogen on Demand from gasoline by cracking fuel vapour at around 300C.
He sells kits for his system very cheaply and most of his customers fit them to their own vehicles.

The system generally uses bubbler fuel at the rate of less than 5% of the regular tank fuel (so less than a liter of bubbler fuel to every 20 liters of tank fuel).
The extra mileage is at least 20% with some systems experiencing as much as double the distance per unit of fuel.
I get more than 30% extra mileage using HCS on my 2.5 liter Ford (EFI/gasoline).

With regard to PCV gases; they are comprised mostly of fuel/air mixture that has leaked past the piston rings during the compression stroke.
They contain little or no exhaust gases because during the exhaust stroke; the exhaust valve is open and there is no great pressure in the cylinder.
There is a small amount of oil vapour in PCV but this seems to present no problems to the engine either in short-term burn response or in the long-term (I've been running HCS on my vehicles for many months with no ill effects at all).

Good to hear that you may try the system on you truck and I hope you'll post your finding here.
By the way; this system works just as well on fuel-injected vehicles as carburetor vehicles.

Last edited by edostar; 03-07-2012 at 05:02 AM.
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Old 03-07-2012, 04:50 AM   #7
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Default Different HCS Schemes.

All HCS systems operate in the same way.
That is to say that fuel vapour is created in the bubbler tank and passes through a heat-tube that cracks it into Hydrogen and Carbon that passes on to the inlet to the burn chamber.
The different systems detailed here describe the obvious ways of powering that flow through the HCS.

One of the great things about the HCS is that it utilizes energy from the engine that would otherwise be left unused.
Exhaust heat, incidental vacuum inlets, exhaust and PCV pressure can all be used to power the system whilst placing no burden on the engine whatsoever.

This contrasts sharply with the better-known HHO system which requires constant electrical current in order to split water molecules into Hydrogen and Oxygen.
This energy drain sits in direct opposition to the gains expected from the system.

The original Hydrocarbon Crack System drew fresh air into the fuel bubbler tank and the resulting vapour was drawn through the Heat Tube and into the engine by means of an inlet vacuum of some kind.

The problem with this system is that it was not often not possible to find a suitable vacuum.

There are basically two kinds of engine vacuum:
Venturi Vacuum and Manifold Vacuum.

The Venturi Vacuum is what a regular carburetor uses to suck the fuel from the reservoir.
At idle; the vacuum is very slight but as the throttle is opened the vacuum increases which makes it ideal for our purposes as it provides more Hydrogen at higher revs and less at lower revs.

The Manifold Vacuum is what you get if you drill a hole in the carburetor manifold and attach a pipe.
At idle it draws impressively but as the throttle is opened; the vacuum quickly fades to almost nothing which makes it highly unsatisfactory for HCS purposes as it provides most Hydrogen when it is least needed.

If a suitable Venturi vacuum can be found; then the vaccum-powered HCS is a very good system but many engines have no available Venturi line and it is difficult to create one.



Pressure operated HCS:

The other option is to push the vapour through the HCS and the two obvious candidates are the PCV outlet and the Exhaust outlet.

Exhaust gases are a good source of Expansion Mediums (see related document) and are ideal for evaporating the bubbler fuel due to their warmth.
The exhaust is a little too hot to be safely used as it exits the engine and a little too remote from the inlet of the engine if taken off just prior to the muffler.
If enough pressure can be obtained from the exhaust pipe at a suitable temperature though; it will work well.

PCV (positive crankcase ventilation) is generated by fuel/air mixture escaping past the piston rings during the compression stroke.
This ‘blow-by’ builds up pressure in the crankcase beneath the burn chamber and is ventilated through the PCV line.

PCV gases are the easiest way to power HCS as they exit the engine conveniently close to the other engine features it uses.
These days the PCV gases are fed back to the burn chamber via the air filter so in using it to vaporize the bubbler fuel for the HCS; we are simply putting it to good use by way of a minor diversion.

PCV gases are warm so help evaporate the bubbler fuel and its pressure follows engine revs which is perfect for us.
In order that the HCS is not subjected to too much pressure; a ventilation screw-valve is placed on a spur line taken off prior to the gases reaching the fuel bubbler and this is the only adjustment necessary to the system.



If we ventilate all the PCV pressure; the HCS gets nothing.
If we ventilate no PCV pressure; the HCS becomes overloaded.
An ideal primary adjustment gives negligible bubbling at engine idle.
On my motorcycle; I have sited this screw valve so that fine adjustment can be made whilst the vehicle is underway.

The excess PCV gases from the screw valve can either be fed to the air intake or ventilated to the environment.
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Old 03-07-2012, 04:54 AM   #8
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Default Expansion Mediums.

Expansion Mediums (why Hydrogen increases the efficiency of ICEs)

Gasoline contains chemical energy, which is of little value by itself when attempting to propel a vehicle. To accomplish useful work, the chemical energy must be converted to kinetic energy. Again the quandary lies in said fuel's inability to efficiently deliver such a direct conversion. Internal combustion engines, therefore, rely on a 2-stage conversion process:

Chemical-> thermal-> kinetic

The fuel is first burned to generate heat.

Chemical-> thermal

From a hot-rodder's viewpoint, this is where high compression and potent ignition systems get to show their stuff. Now a new problem. Heat can't power our vehicles any better than the liquid gasoline we started with. We need yet another conversion,

Thermal-> kinetic

As the fuel burns and generates heat, it heats up the nitrogen, water vapor (either water injected, ambient humidity, or a byproduct of combustion), and carbon dioxide (combustion byproduct). The nitrogen is present in the incoming air charge. Some of the water vapor and pretty much all of the carbon dioxide are results of burning the fuel. The water, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and other elements that expand in the cylinder when heated are called the Expansion Medium.

An expansion medium is required to accomplish the Thermal-> Kinetic conversion. Without an expansion medium, you just heat up (or burn up) the engine. Furthermore, the different gasses have different thermal expansion coefficients. Stated in simpler terms, water expands at 12 times the rate of nitrogen, and carbon dioxide is more expansive than water. To get more power from the same fuel you could simply switch from nitrogen to a more potent expansion medium.

Let's consider how water injection can be expected to perform under this model. If the water is injected into the air stream in an aerosol (like from an injector or mister nozzle), it will first undergo a phase change from liquid to vapor. Some of the thermal energy in the combustion charge that could otherwise act on the expansion medium is consumed vaporizing the water resulting in no net gain or loss in mileage.
If the water is fed into the engine in a vapor form, then the available thermal energy acts upon the water vapor as an expansion medium, but without the parasitic losses associated with the vaporization process.

Exhaust gasses typically contain 13% CO2, 18% H2O, and 69% nitrogen. Aside from the effects on combustion rate, exhaust gasses make for a very potent expansion medium. Now factor in the effect on the burn and you net a slower and cooler burn with the presence of inert exhaust gasses.

Finally, add some Hydrogen and see how it purrs.
At atmospheric pressures, gasoline burns at a rate of 41.5 cm/sec. In contrast, bottled hydrogen burns at 237 cm/sec. This is over 5.6 times as fast.
HHO has been recorded to burn as fast as 240,000 cm/sec!! It depends on several factors as to the precise speed of HHO, but it is many factors faster than even bottled hydrogen.

The Hydrogen produced by HCS is a powerful expansion medium which gives a net gain in power and efficiency.
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Old 04-07-2012, 04:46 AM   #9
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Default Why HCS?

The standard reaction to a system like HCS is one of disbelief.
It makes no sense to most people that one can construct a simple engine add-on both cheaply and easily and achieve such impressive gains in power and fuel efficiency.

The reasons for this disbelief lie more in people’s perceptions of the truth than in the Science behind the technology.

Everyone knows that the most efficient internal combustion engines (ICEs) barely manage to convert 30% of the energy potential of gasoline into forward motion of the vehicle.
The remaining 70% is wasted in the form of heat, noise, vibration or just dumped out of the exhaust pipe as pollution.
In the light of this; it should come as no surprise that someone has managed to increase the fuel efficiency of ICEs in such a simple manner.

The fuel industry is a monopoly (whatever the apparent measure of competition) and has always worked hand in hand with the motor industry (to the extent that they can be regarded as one integrated industry).
Without the help of the motor industry; the fuel industry would have very few customers.
As long as the vehicle-buying public accept the fiction that 30% fuel efficiency is ‘state of the art’ then they will continue to drive vehicles that throw away more fuel than they use for propulsion.
This level of waste suits the fuel industry very well as it means a continuation to the grossly inflated sales figures that they have enjoyed for many decades now.

Many systems have been devised to increase the fuel efficiency of ICEs and they have all been suppressed one way or another by the fuel industry.
This site has many case histories of such suppression:
http://fuel-efficient-vehicles.org/energy-news/

For reasons explained in a previous post about Expansion Mediums; adding Hydrogen to the regular intake of fuel/air increases the efficiency of the ICE greatly.

The better-known HHO system creates Hydrogen on Demand onboard the vehicle by cracking limited quantities of Hydrogen and Oxygen from Water using electrolysis which requires a constant current from the vehicle’s alternator.
This places a constant burden on the engine and greatly reduces many of the gains promised by the increase in Hydrogen to the burn chamber.
The energy monopolies haven’t intervened in this technology as it really doesn’t save very much fuel in the long run and is generally perceived as dangerous.

HCS was developed in Indonesia where many hundreds of vehicles now run the system to very good effect but it has only recently come to the attention of the Western Democracies.
For reasons discussed earlier; people in these countries have long accepted the fiction that it is impossible to improve the efficiency of an ICE and so are inclined to dismiss the system out of hand.

The truth is that Hydrogen really does significantly improve the running efficiency of ICEs and that with this simple little system; it is easy to produce plenty of Hydrogen onboard with no drain whatsoever on the engine.

Many of the innovations developed in the past have been hastily suppressed by the energy monopolies by disappearing the inventor or buying up the Patent or offering a partnership that never materializes etc.
HCS was developed by someone who appears content to sell kits very cheaply by mail order and has no apparent interest in applying for a Patent or seriously capitalizing on his discovery.
This means that the energy monopolies cannot suppress it as it is unprotected and firmly in the public domain.

HCS is very easily put together by anyone with minimal bench skills.
It uses no specialist parts and all the items necessary are easily bought at local stores for very little money.
For this reason; I like to promote it in the hope that some of you will suspend your disbelief long enough to actually fit it to your vehicle.

It will increase the power and torque of your vehicle.
It will make it run more smoothly with less noise and vibration.
It will greatly reduce the level of tail-pipe pollution.
It will give you at least an extra 20% mileage per unit of fuel with many users experiencing well in excess of this figure.

Dan.

Last edited by edostar; 04-07-2012 at 04:55 AM.
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Old 04-07-2012, 05:15 AM   #10
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A couple of things this reminds me of are the "100mpg" carbs which invariably involved heat vaporization of fuel, and the wood gasifier devices which cook wood (high temperature, oxygen starved environment) to produce a gas which can be burned by an ICE.

In a carb engine, this system would introduce fuel ( in the form of highly vaporized gasoline, or (if the system really 'cracks' hydrocarbons) free hydrogen and carbon in gaseous form into the air stream of the vehicle, enriching the fuel mixture. In a fuel injected system, the computer will read the O2 sensors and adjust the fuel pulse width size to account for the additional fuel being fed into the air.

Question: How much fuel is consumed by the HCS? How often do you refill the bubbler tank? Have you measured MPG changes on identical test drives with and without the HCS running?

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Old 04-07-2012, 07:46 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by apollo_gnomon View Post
A couple of things this reminds me of are the "100mpg" carbs which invariably involved heat vaporization of fuel, and the wood gasifier devices which cook wood (high temperature, oxygen starved environment) to produce a gas which can be burned by an ICE.

In a carb engine, this system would introduce fuel ( in the form of highly vaporized gasoline, or (if the system really 'cracks' hydrocarbons) free hydrogen and carbon in gaseous form into the air stream of the vehicle, enriching the fuel mixture. In a fuel injected system, the computer will read the O2 sensors and adjust the fuel pulse width size to account for the additional fuel being fed into the air.

Question: How much fuel is consumed by the HCS? How often do you refill the bubbler tank? Have you measured MPG changes on identical test drives with and without the HCS running?
People are always getting sidetracked by the fact that HCS starts by vapourizing the fuel but the similarities between this and 'vapour systems' ends there.
HCS cracks the fuel vapour directly into Hydrogen and Carbon and it is this powerful 'expansion medium' that accounts for the impressive gains experienced by anyone who has got past denial and actually tried the system in practice.

I haven't done clinical trials on the system; only approximately parallel tankfuls of gasoline driving around town first without HCS fitted (where I got no more than 6 kilometers per liter (kpl) and subsequently with HCS fitted (where I achieved 7.5 kpl in town and over 8.5 out of town).
That's just the approximate fuel consumption numbers which don't reflect the greatly reduced tailpipe pollution (which is clear and odour-free) and the sharply increased power of the vehicle.
The smooth, quiet drive is also difficult to quantify in numerical terms.

It would be interesting for someone to do a comparative Dyno test with and without HCS but I'm just sharing the system here and am selling nothing.
I hope that others will try the system and enjoy the same benefits that I've experienced but please remember that I stand to gain nothing by it.

I use bubbler fuel at the rate of less than 5% of the regular tank fuel so I need to add less than a liter of bubbler fuel for each 20 liters of tank fuel.

Dan.
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Old 04-07-2012, 05:42 PM   #12
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Thanks, Dan.

By the way, something you've said isn't technically true:
Quote:
One of the great things about the HCS is that it utilizes energy from the engine that would otherwise be left unused.
Exhaust heat, incidental vacuum inlets, exhaust and PCV pressure can all be used to power the system whilst placing no burden on the engine whatsoever.
The fuel vapor in the copper cracking tube puts a btu load on the exhaust gasses, in the form of a cold spot. The effect is going to be pretty minor (I still haven't found good numbers for the heat load requirements for cracking complex hydrocarbons, still looking) but nonetheless present. Also, the fluid level in the bubbler tank effectively increases the weight of the PCV checkvalve, putting additional crankcase pressure resistance on the pisons.

Obviously, both of these are pretty minor, probably within statistical noise, but cannot be discounted entirely if doing an accurate energy budget for the engine to determine efficiency potential.
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Old 04-07-2012, 05:46 PM   #13
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Oh, and just so ya know, I'm not saying things like the above to discredit the system or anything, but as part of the data to analyze the possibilities. As you say, the ICE is at best 30% efficient at turning hydrocarbons into motion, so any incremental improvements should be stacked with other improvements to get all the gains one possibly can. I'm intrigued by the HCS idea. I've never heard of this one before you brought it up.
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Old 04-07-2012, 10:49 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by edostar View Post
I'm certain it's Hydrogen that is going into the burn chamber for the following reasons.
It gives the same response that HHO gives (smoother, quieter run to the engine) and in the case of HCS; greater power as it takes nothing from the engine to produce the Hydrogen.
Also; when running the vehicle with a cold engine (starting it cold and driving it off) it begins by running a bit lumpy (because just fuel vapour is being added to the inlet) but as soon as the heat-tube reaches the required threshold to crack the fuel; the response immediately changes and it runs smooth, quiet and with greater power (because the hydrocarbon vapour is being cracked into Hydrogen and Carbon).
If it was just gaining fuel vapour; it would run pretty much the same at all temperatures with no obvious threshold.

As for diesel engines; I haven't tried it myself but I hear that Hydrogen is as beneficial to diesels as it is to gasoline engines.
This would make sense as the 'expansion medium' factor is applicable to all ICEs.
It sounds plausible but dont get where hydrogen is comming from

Thanks for the thread btw..I too hadnt read about this before..
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Old 05-07-2012, 12:24 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by h2pogo View Post
It sounds plausible but dont get where hydrogen is comming from

Thanks for the thread btw..I too hadnt read about this before..
From "cracking" the long chain hydrocarbon molecules into smaller bits, ideally free hydrogen and free carbon available for rapid combustion in the engine cylinder.
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Old 05-07-2012, 01:39 AM   #16
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Default HCS on my Kawasaki Ninja 250R.

Here are a couple of photos of the HCS installation that I made for my Kawasaki Ninja 250r.


Here’s the finished bike which shows no outward signs of being partly powered by Hydrogen.

The bubbler tank position (original air filter removed):


The PCV tube (on the top of the crankcase) connected to the HCS:


The copper heat tube wrapped around the exhaust pipe:


Some more tubes:



Not bad for an easy afternoon’s work.

The copper pipes in the line near the bubbler tank are for easy disconnection for refilling.

All the pipes are regular motorcycle fuel pipe.
The narrow gauge ‘Y’ connectors are for water installations I think.
The bubbler tank is a home-converted petrol bottle that came with a lawn mower.

I drilled the faces of the filter pods; inserted a piece of rubber pipe and forced a short piece of copper pipe in to form a sealed connection.
If you still have the original air filter box; you can just lead the hydrogen pipe into its air inlet.

The adjuster screw valve is positioned so as to be easily accessible when all the panels are back in place.
I can even adjust it with one hand while riding.

Dan.

Last edited by edostar; 05-07-2012 at 01:42 AM.
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Old 07-07-2012, 02:14 AM   #17
edostar
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Default Before and after HCS.

Kawasaki Ninja 250R before and after fitting HCS.

When I first bought the Ninja featured in this article; I was seriously disappointed with its performance.
The power band was very narrow which meant changing gear constantly in order to get a decent response from the engine.
It vibrated and made an impressive amount of noise but lacked the power necessary to propel such a heavy bike along the road properly.
I wished I’d bought a higher powered version; perhaps with a 650cc engine or higher.

I re-jetted the carbs, removed the restrictive air filter and exchanged the exhaust system for one that ventilated more freely and this added some power but the engine suffered from many of the same deficiencies as before and shared similar basic characteristics.
As might be expected; the fuel consumption went up somewhat due to the removal of the restrictive factory adjustments.

I fitted HCS which was an simple job due to the extra space (and easy access to the PCV outlet) afforded by the removal of the bulky air filter box.
The immediate effects of the added hydrogen to the carbs was that the power-band widened a lot; meaning that the bike cruised easily at low speeds in high gears.
The engine noise and vibration were reduced considerably and the bike accelerated freely no ‘dead-spots’ anywhere.
In short; the Ninja is now a pleasure to ride and my initial disappointment at having bought an expensive pile of junk has evaporated completely.
The fuel consumption went down again and the bike now uses rather less fuel than specified by the factory.

It’s still only a 250cc motorcycle with a heavy engine and frame but its sharply increased power and running efficiency (due to the HCS) more than compensates for this.

It constantly amazes me that so many people appear to be perfectly satisfied with the desperately poor performance of modern internal combustion engines.
Far from embracing systems that claim to improve efficiency; they dismiss them with defensive hostility while the vehicle manufacturers and oil companies are laughing all the way to the bank.

Dan.

Last edited by edostar; 07-07-2012 at 11:35 AM.
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Old 09-07-2012, 05:35 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edostar View Post
I was asked to start this thread after contributing slightly off-topic comments to the Hydrogen As Fuel thread in the same forum.
That thread is discussing HHO technology (electrolyzing Brown's Gas from water) as a valuable fuel supplement to internal combustion engines (ICEs).
Thanks for posting. Interesting read.

My only concern would be a flame path from cranckase to bubbler, say from a broken piston ring and a rich running engine. Just a thought.


I've got to say it, I'm sure you mentioned it - fit a water injection kit!




Quote:
Car Engine With Water or Steam Injection
Link - http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showthread.php?t=161241
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Old 09-07-2012, 05:49 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by apollo_gnomon View Post
A couple of things this reminds me of are the "100mpg" carbs which invariably involved heat vaporization of fuel, and the wood gasifier devices which cook wood (high temperature, oxygen starved environment) to produce a gas which can be burned by an ICE.

In a carb engine, this system would introduce fuel ( in the form of highly vaporized gasoline, or (if the system really 'cracks' hydrocarbons) free hydrogen and carbon in gaseous form into the air stream of the vehicle, enriching the fuel mixture.
Indeed, the 100mpg claim this reminds me of was about 2 US Airmen working on Jet planes many years ago. The afterburner gave them the inspiration and they created a carb that heated the petrol to a gas. I always assumed they run the car on the gas but perhaps they just mixed it with the regular fuel and improved the MPG and dropped the emissions.

This is similar to combining LPG (Propane) with Diesel engines, by fumigating through the air filter. LPG installers offer kits now for that here in UK - not many I might add, but some do.

The gas, ignites first, warming the diesel and partially evapourating it. So when the diesel burns, it burns more completely.

I heard American farmers used to do this with their Diesel generators, they 'spiked' or 'boosted' the generator with Propane.

Because the main fuel, Diesel or Petrol, ignites better, there is less of a 'pop' when it burns, reducing engine knock.

It wouldn't really matter if this is vapourised fuel or hydrogen, any gas will have the same effect, hairspray for instance or EZ start for starting cold engines, since gas will combust earlier than droplets of fuel and preheat the main fuel you get a better burn. Combining LPG and Diesel can give a 40% increase in power.

My guess is its highly vapourised petrol if there's enough of it through the rev range, it should improve the burn.
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Old 10-07-2012, 07:38 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by h2pogo View Post
I Wonder what would happen applied to a diesel?
Quote:
Diesel LPG Conversions

Diesel engines can be converted to run partly on LPG, partly on diesel. This method uses the combustion of the diesel to ignite the LPG. The benefits include large increases in power and reduction in emissions, particularly the black smoke often associated with diesels.

Typically a ratio of 30% LPG to 70% diesel is possible. No adjustments are required to the diesel injection system and fuel savings come from the fact that throttle openings are lower due to the greatly increased power, which basically means you do not have to press the accelerator as hard to get the same performance.

Fuel savings up to 30% are possible with the increased power levels seen as a major benefit to users.

Link - http://www.tinleytech.co.uk/lpgsys.html#lpg
So if you were using vaporised petrol..

Litres per min?

Its worth working out.

If combining diesel and lpg gives an increase, a vaporised petrol gas in a petrol engine should also give a rise in performance, as would HHO gas. The question is, how much is needed to make a difference.
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