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Old 29-01-2016, 01:25 PM   #1
supertzar
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Lightbulb There Are No Musician Athletes

or

Athletes Are Warriors, Musicians Are Shamans


This is something I have been thinking about for a while. With all the athletes in the world I would expect there would be some who have had a notable career in music also but I can't think of a single one. I mean there are athletes who have dabbled in music: Darren McCarty, the former Detroit Red Wing has a band called Grinder, Shaquile O'neal had his foray into Rap and Oscar De La Hoya tried his hand at Latin crooning but I don't think they would have gotten attention for their efforts if they weren't stars of their sport already.

Nice job, Ron Artest. You really put a certain feeling into it but it is kind of a joke, albeit one that is lost on you!




It's like there are two mutually repellent streams in life. Music and sports are two of the most universal interests all over the planet so they must intertwine: music is used in sports but the band has a special non-combatant status. The band heralds the team as horns have heralded warriors since the ancient past. The sound of the horns is meant to inspire courage on the field which brings us to the power of music to transform consciousness.

Much nicer




I think music developed from shamanic peoples around the world singing and playing to induce trance states, often with assistance from entheogenic compounds. By the song of the shaman the people were surely guided on a journey into the unfathomable vastness of psychic space within. It represents a sort of spiritual technology developed over untold millennia. It's something people crave and I think it drives the human obsession with music: the desire to transform consciousness outside of the realm of normalcy.

Huun Huur Tu from Tuva and Bulgarian singers with an amazing demonstration of the universality of music and its power to move the heart


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Old 29-01-2016, 01:40 PM   #2
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Is it not possible that the top athletes/sport stars have to dedicate most of their time from a young age to their choosen disipline?
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Old 29-01-2016, 01:44 PM   #3
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Interesting thoughts, super.

I suppose it depends on what one regards as 'music'?

Rhythm is an integral part of music, I'd say. Our accents have rhythms, so from the time we hear speech, or speak ourselves, we encounter rhythm. Our hearts beat, so we have an innate rhythm going on.

But, we all move as well. We have limbs that love to move.

Sporty athletes have taken movement to another level.

Musicians have taken rhythm to another level.

Musicians are not necessarily spiritual though, well...we are all spiritual beings, but, many musicians have no interest in anything to do with spirituality or learning about life in a deeper way.

Also, with how sport works in the world these days, a person needs to expose their sporting prowess at a very young age before anyone will take them seriously. Music on the other hand....people can be late bloomers, or they fail to acknowledge their ability until they find the confidence.


But see this old zio -Guardian article:
Quote:
First in the rock'n'roll queue is former Perugia and LA Galaxy star Alexei Lalas. "The American ginger goatee man-thing and erstwhile rock star plays the guitar," says Ravi Hiranan. "I saw him play some song called Keep Kickin' Balls on TV once. It was painful."

Kenneth Sterne totally agrees, man. "He actually opened for Hootie and the Blowfish on their European tour in 1998 and has released three albums, one titled Ginger," says Kenneth, arching an eyebrow.

Closer to home, West Ham defender Christian Dailly is the lead singer and guitarist in a band called Hooligan. "According to some tabloid or other a couple of months back, they were going to release a single," says Yvette Thomas. "No idea what actually happened to it though."

Meanwhile Nottingham Forest's Frank Clark was a "dab hand on the acoustic guitar" according to Martin Widdicks, who also points out that Forest's shaggy-haired striker Paul McGregor (who scored the crucial goal against Lyon in a Uefa Cup tie in 1995/96) was also a singer Britpop band called Merc. Sadly both player and band disappeared without trace.

Then there's the novelty football record market. Cue Stuart Maconie-esque reminiscing about Glenn Hoddle and Chris Waddle's Diamond Lights, Paul Gascoigne's Fog on the Tyne and Kevin Keegan's It Ain't Easy and Head Over Heels in Love. More recently, Andy Cole's miserable attempts to tap into the R'n'B/rap crossover market in 2000 with Outstanding (sample lyric: "I'm kicking racism out the door") failed to make the top 40.

As for musicians playing football, Julio Iglesias was a goalkeeper for Real Madrid in the early sixties, before a serious car accident during the 1961-62 season forced him into retirement.

"He was only 20 and had to spend months in hospital," says Antonio Gonzalez. "The legend has it that the nurse who looked after him gave him a guitar and from then on, he never looked back." That's something we've touched upon in a previous bossa-nova-tinged Knowledge.

Meanwhile, Rod Stewart was on the books with Brentford before joining the faces while, as Declan Duggan points out, Spandau Ballet's Steve Kemp and Steve Norman signed for Melchester Rovers in 1985 with Martin scoring on his first-team debut.
http://www.theguardian.com/football/...nowledge.sport
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Old 29-01-2016, 01:46 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by hister67 View Post
Is it not possible that the top athletes/sport stars have to dedicate most of their time from a young age to their choosen disipline?
Obviously that is the case and the two disciplines use very different skill sets so that brings down the number of people who are great at both. I still would expect some individuals out of the many to be able do it though.
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Old 29-01-2016, 01:49 PM   #5
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A list of nine musical footballers.

http://www.footballerswines.co.uk/fo...ing-musicians/


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Old 29-01-2016, 01:54 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by supertzar View Post
Obviously that is the case and the two disciplines use very different skill sets so that brings down the number of people who are great at both. I still would expect some individuals out of the many to be able do it though.
Johnny Mathis
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Old 29-01-2016, 02:08 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by tildatod View Post
Interesting thoughts, super.

I suppose it depends on what one regards as 'music'?

Rhythm is an integral part of music, I'd say. Our accents have rhythms, so from the time we hear speech, or speak ourselves, we encounter rhythm. Our hearts beat, so we have an innate rhythm going on.

But, we all move as well. We have limbs that love to move.

Sporty athletes have taken movement to another level.

Musicians have taken rhythm to another level.

Musicians are not necessarily spiritual though, well...we are all spiritual beings, but, many musicians have no interest in anything to do with spirituality or learning about life in a deeper way.

Also, with how sport works in the world these days, a person needs to expose their sporting prowess at a very young age before anyone will take them seriously. Music on the other hand....people can be late bloomers, or they fail to acknowledge their ability until they find the confidence.


But see this old zio -Guardian article:


http://www.theguardian.com/football/...nowledge.sport

Music is pleasing rhythm and tone so it is really in the ear of the listener. Ten ton presses in a stamping plant could literally be music to the plant owner's ears. I tend to think of it as vocalized and/or played on instruments but then again almost anything could be an instrument.

It's all advanced a long way from the old days but I think the connection to those times is strong deep inside us. Musicians at their best still transform us. That's what we pay for. Athletes constantly strive to improve performance and we pay to see that too. With athletics fans I think the primary drive is the need for a champion or protector going back to tribal days.

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Old 29-01-2016, 02:19 PM   #8
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Johnny Mathis
Haha, my mom likes him. Didn't know Johnny Mathis was asked to try out for the olympics in track. One time I had to go to a Johnny Mathis concert when I was a kid and did not enjoy it at all. It hurt my ears!

Okay, that's notable I guess. I don't know if it's really a bona fide career though, you know? It's kind of a footnote to his music career.

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Old 29-01-2016, 02:29 PM   #9
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Haha, my mom likes him. Didn't know Johnny Mathis was asked to try out for the olympics in track. One time I had to go to a Johnny Mathis concert when I was a kid and did not enjoy it at all. It hurt my ears!

Okay, that's notable I guess. I don't know if it's really a bona fide career though, you know? It's kind of a footnote to his music career.
Hope you don't think I'm a fan of his
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Old 29-01-2016, 02:40 PM   #10
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Hope you don't think I'm a fan of his
Didn't think so. Welsh people tend to have good musical instincts. Grandma was a Welsh immigrant so I could be biased.


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Old 29-01-2016, 02:53 PM   #11
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Jaron Lanier, the visionary technologist holds that ancient instrument-making was the primary catalyst for technological innovation, not weapon-building.

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Old 29-01-2016, 03:21 PM   #12
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Roy Jones Jr's "Can't be touched" rap song is actually not too bad. But no, I can't think of anystand outs that have hit the mainstream.

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Old 29-01-2016, 03:33 PM   #13
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Roy Jones Jr's "Can't be touched" rap song is actually not too bad. But no, I can't think of anyone stand outs that have hit the mainstream.
Okay, I have heard that before. That is a legit track. Verses by RJ Jr. (I think that's him? Not sure) are not bad at all either. Was that a one-shot deal?




I see - Roy Jones Jr. holding it down with somewhat of a music career:

Wikipedia
Quote:
Jones started his rap music career in 2001 with his album, titled Round One: The Album and the debut single, "Y'All Must've Forgot". In 2004, Jones formed a group – Body Head Bangerz and released an album. The album, Body Head Bangerz: Volume One, featured B.G., Juvenile, Bun B of UGK, Petey Pablo, Lil' Flip and Mike Jones among others.

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Old 29-01-2016, 03:57 PM   #14
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I saw that, davebeard.

I think athletes are intelligent in a different way. I suppose there is a part of the brain that governs large-motor movements in which high level athletes are gifted, where a musician or actor would be developed in other areas. I mean there are guys who do genius level shit on the court but put them in front of a camera with a script and they turn to wood.
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Old 29-01-2016, 04:52 PM   #15
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The Mayan game of Pok Ta Pok: played by warriors who it is said were literally playing for their lives. Just imagine the intensity and skill they must have had. Extensive musical and theatrical ritual in this modern day portrayal.

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Old 29-01-2016, 08:50 PM   #16
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Most of the musicians I've known (including myself) have been quite sporty.

I've only met two genuine prodigies in my life, and I've been around musicians for most of it, so I consider it quite rare. One of which (a pianist) was a more than decent football (soccer) player and generally enjoyed sport.
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Old 29-01-2016, 09:38 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by white light View Post
Most of the musicians I've known (including myself) have been quite sporty.

I've only met two genuine prodigies in my life, and I've been around musicians for most of it, so I consider it quite rare. One of which (a pianist) was a more than decent football (soccer) player and generally enjoyed sport.
I mean I played soccer and I'm a strength training devotee but don't consider myself an athlete. Musician, yes. Steve Harris from Iron Maiden famously wanted to play professionally but realized that wasn't happening so picked up the bass instead.


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Old 29-01-2016, 09:59 PM   #18
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I mean I played soccer and I'm a strength training devotee but don't consider myself an athlete. Musician, yes. Steve Harris from Iron Maiden famously wanted to play professionally but realized that wasn't happening so picked up the bass instead.

Mind and body co-ordination is required for both sport and music.

I remember playing a footie match musos v actors (from a thesp college) and we thrashed them 20 - 0 or something.

But there's probably no rules with it, I've met musicians who couldn't kick a ball to save their lives.

I expect that with top draw athletes there's not much time to pursue any musical avenues even they have the talent or interest.
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Old 30-01-2016, 04:17 AM   #19
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Off the top of my head, former pro bodybuilder Kevin Levrone was in a band.

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Old 30-01-2016, 05:59 AM   #20
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Gareth Icke?
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