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Old 17-11-2009, 03:35 AM   #1
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Default The Bloodlust of Sekhmet

Sekhmet
And the Near Destruction of Mankind


http://www.lesvampires.org/mirrorsportal/sekhmet.html

There was a time in ancient Egypt where humans entered into a conspiracy to overthrow the Gods. They blasphemed against Ra, king of Gods and men, and heretical priests and magicians plotted ways to turn against the Gods for their destruction, using those very powers the Gods had given to men that they might flourish and grow great upon the earth. Ra, hearing of this plan, called to meet with him the most ancient and potent Deities, those who had been with him in the primeval waters before the time when with his eye, the sun, he had made life. The Gods counseled together and it was decided that Sekhmet, the force against which no other force avails, would appear on the earth and quell the rebellion. Sekhmet would manifest and punish all those who had held in their minds evil images and imagined wicked plots.

Then Sekhmet walked among men and destroyed them and drank their blood. Night after night Sekhmet waded in blood, slaughtering humans, tearing and rending their bodies, and drinking their blood. The other Gods decided that the slaughter was enough and should stop, but they could find no way to stop Sekhmet, who was drunk on human blood. As the carnage went on, the Gods recognized that Sekhmet, Her rage sustained by intoxication, would implacably proceed with the killing until the last human life had been extinguished.

Then Ra had brought to him from Elephantine certain plants which have been said to be the Solanaceae family and which can be brewed as powerful mind-altering drugs. Those plants, and possibly also opium or hemp, were sent to the God Sekti at Heliopolis. Sekti added these drugs to a mixture of beer and also human blood, until seven thousand great jugs of the substance had been made. The jars were taken to a place where Sekhmet would pass and there were poured out onto the ground, inundating the fields for a great distance. And when Sekhmet came to these fields and perceived what She thought to be blood, She rejoiced and drank all of the liquid. Then "Her heart was filled with joy," Her mind was changed, and She thought no more of destroying mankind.

"After that, Ra addressed Sekhmet as the One Who Comes in Peace, praising the beauty and charm of the Goddess." Sekhmet is the goddess most often depicted with the head of a lioness, occasionally with the sun disk. There are more large statues of Sekhmet than of any other deity. Like many deities, the Goddess Sekhmet manifested in many different aspects. She is the bringer of disease and the Great One of Healing. She is the Goddess of War and the Goddess of Love. She is also an underworld deity, known for her destructive tendencies. She has the power to completely destroy not only human bodies, but also their souls - total destruction. She, additionally, is the protector of the dead in the underworld. Some authors have suggested a connection between Sekhmet and kundalini energy.

To become an initiate in the temple of Sekhmet, candidates were actually put to a ritualised "death" where they had to deal with its horrors. These horrors included facing "fiends and vampires". Those who did not succeed in overcoming their fears, if they survived, were disqualified. Her priests and priestesses were considered to be extremely powerful - both as physicians and as practitioners of magick who had the power to destroy and command demons.

The demons of Egypt were divided into two categories: those that serve Sekhmet and those that are of the underworld. Sekhmet’s demons were dispatched to send disease, chaos and pestilence. The demons of the underworld were considered to be worse as they stole body parts from the dead and would eat the hearts of the unworthy. Sekhmet was named the Avenger of Wrongs, and the Scarlet Lady, a reference to blood, and thus also seen as ruling over menstruation. Celebrations for Sekhmet included wild orgies, which earned her the additional titles of Great Harlot and Lady of the Scarlet-Coloured Garments. Those celebrations also included the drinking of the exact substance given to Sekhmet to quench her thirst - sans the blood according to several authors.

This telling of the myth was taken from the walls of the tomb of Seti and unfortunately is the only known version that discusses the blood lust of Sekhmet. Much information has been lost. Of the goddess' four thousand names only a few hundred have survived. In those names that have come down to us, there are a few interesting hints of a connection between Sekhmet and vampirism: Lady of Transformations, Enrapturing One, Giver of Ecstasies, Mother of the Dead, Lady of the Bloodbath, Devouring One, and Terrible One.

A Hymn of Sekhmet

Mine is a heart of carnelian, crimson as murder on a holy day.
Mine is a heart of corneal, the gnarled roots of a dogwood and the
bursting of flowers.
I am the broken wax seal on my lover's letters.
I am the phoenix, the fiery sun, consuming and resuming myself.
I will what I will.
Mine is a heart of carnelian, blood red as the crest of a phoenix.

Source: "The Goddess Sekhmet, Psycho-Spiritual Exercises of the Fifth Way" by Robert Masters

http://www.lesvampires.org/mirrorsportal/sekhmet.html

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Old 17-11-2009, 03:57 AM   #2
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Great post, and very interesting!

I like your new thread topic sizzle
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Old 17-11-2009, 09:04 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by limelady View Post
Great post, and very interesting!

I like your new thread topic sizzle
She seems to be a very interesting one, this 'lady in red'.

If her priests and priestesses were 'extremely powerful' back in the day, and were such highly accomplished physicians and magicians, it's difficult to imagine that cult not surviving and continuing in different, disguised forms right on down to the present day.

Since "Sekhmet’s demons were dispatched to send disease, chaos and pestilence", I think it might be timely now to take a good look at her and try to figure out how she rolls.

One Hundred Names and Epithets of the Goddess Sekhmet
compiled by Robert Masters The Goddess Sekhmet: The Way of the Five Bodies (NY: Amity House, 1988)


Sekhmet, Great one of Magic
Mother of the Gods
One who was before the Gods were
Lady of the Place of the Beginning of Time
Beloved of Ra, her father
Beloved of Bast, her sister
Beloved of Ptah, her husband-brother
At whose wish the arts were born
Beautiful eye which giveth life to the two
lands
Beautiful face, image most beloved by art
Flaming one
Sovereign of Ra, her father
Protectress of the Gods
Lady of the Scarlet-colored garment
Pure One
Destroyer of Rebellions
Eye of Ra
Eye of Horus
Pre-eminent one in the boat of the millions of years
Roamer of deserts
Wanderer in the wastes
Self-contained
Only one
Awakener
Lady of Enchantments
Opener of Ways
Lady of Transformations
Lady of the many faces
Enrapturing one
Giver of Ecstasies
Satisfier of desires
Inspirer of males
Victorious one in battles
Overcomer of all enemies


Ruler of the desert
Ruler of Serpents and of Dragons
Ruler of Lions
Complete One
Sublime One
Enlightener
Empowerer
Sparkling One
Great one of Hekau
Lady of the Magic Lamp
Mother of the Dead
Lady of the Bloodbath
Destroyer by Plagues
Great one of Healing
Destroyer by Fire
Lady of the Waters of Life
Mistress and Lady of the Tomb
Great one in the places of judgment and execution
Guide and protectress from the perils of the underworld
Great one of the Place of appearances in Silence
Lady of the Way of the Five Bodies
Unrivaled and invincible one
Ruler of the Chamber of Flames
The source
She whose opportunity escapeth her not
Winged one
Powerful of heart
The aware
The gleaming one
Sekhmet, who reduceth to silence
Sekhmet, who rouseth the people
Lady of Jubilation
Adorable one


Shining of countenance
Mother of images
Incomparable one
Lady of Intoxications
Mightier than the gods
Most beautiful
Most strong
Great one of laws
Protectress of the divine order
The one who holds back darkness
The beautiful light
Warrior goddess
Goddess of Love
Great one in Heaven
Great serpent on the head of her father
Great one of the incense of the Ennead
Great lady of the House of Life
Queen of the Venerable Ones
Lady of the House of Books
Devouring One
Sekhmet of the Knives
Burner of Evildoers
One before whom Evil trembles
Terrible One
Lady of all Powers
Eternal as her Father
Lady of the Manifold Adornments
Most beautiful among Gods
Bountiful One
Sekhmet, who gives Joys
Unwavering Loyal One
Beloved Teacher
Beloved Sekhmet


http://www.sekhmettemple.com/Namespage.htm

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Old 17-11-2009, 09:16 AM   #4
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Phew.....now THAT'S a handle!

Was there anything that lady couldn't do?
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Old 17-11-2009, 10:04 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by limelady View Post
Was there anything that lady couldn't do?
She liked to keep busy.


Sounds like she was a little demanding too...



Having once unleashed her powers for the destruction of mankind, the Egyptians feared a repeat performance by Sekhmet. The Egyptian people developed an elaborate ritual in hopes she could be appeased. This ritual revolved around more than 700 statues of the goddess (such as the one to the left). The ancient Egyptian priests were required to perform a ritual before a different one of these statues each morning and each afternoon of every single day of every single year. Only by the strictest adherence to this never-ending ritual could the ancient Egyptians be assured of their ability to placate Sekhmet.


http://www.egyptianmyths.net/sekhmet.htm

EDIT: So many of her statues have survived intact, btw, because they were apparently coated in anthrax in ancient times to prevent vandalism.

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Old 17-11-2009, 10:54 AM   #6
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As with the Goddess Isis, Sekhmet seems to have been reinvented in the twentieth century. Although she is still regarded as a powerful force, to be approached with respect and caution, we can perceive a 'watering down' of her aspects. In Ancient Egypt she was dangerous and ferocious, the bringer of plagues and retribution, the fire of the sun God's eye. This was no benign figure, who could be adored and worshipped as a gentle mother.

Today many women view Sekhmet as a source of strength, independence and assertiveness, and commune with her frequency when these attributes need to be augmented or instilled. To some Sekhmet has become the symbol of the modern woman. She is approached as a healer, bringer of justice and as a guardian or protector, but the emphasis has shifted. It seems a natural progression that Sekhmet has transformed from what was almost a force of chaos into an icon of immanent female power.

http://www.crystalinks.com/sekhmet.html


- I've noticed some female empowerment clips on youtube based around awakening the Sekhmet energy. Maybe people are being badly deceived by this twentieth century reinvention of her nature?

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Old 17-11-2009, 12:55 PM   #7
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In the Pyramid Text we find the oldest collection of religious spells known to us from ancient Egypt. This collection forms the basis of much of the later religious theology and literature of ancient Egypt. The passages were eventually separated and categorized, as well as illustrated and eventually evolved into the Book of the Dead, or more properly, "The Book of the Coming forth by Day". The oldest of these text come from that Pyramid of Wenis, or more popularly these days, Unas at Saqqara.

http://www.touregypt.net/featurestories/pyramidtext.htm

Since Saqqara is home to the oldest known pyramid in all of Egypt, the Step Pyramid of King Djoser:

http://interoz.com/EGYPT/stepyram.htm



...and the pyramid of Unas at Saqqara contains the oldest known collection of religious spells from Ancient Egypt, then it's probably a good bet that this pyramid will tell us some useful things about the 'Mother of God' Sekhmet herself...

The Pyramid Complex of Unas is located in the pyramid field at Saqqara, near Cairo in Egypt.

The pyramid of Unas of the Fifth Dynasty (originally known as Beautiful are the places of Unas) is now ruined, and looks more like a small hill than a royal pyramid.

It was investigated by Perring and then Lepsius, but it was Gaston Maspero who first gained entry to the chambers in 1881, where he found texts covering the walls of the burial chambers, these together with others found in nearby pyramids are now known as the Pyramid Texts. In the burial chamber itself the remains of a mummy were found, including the skull, right arm and shin, but whether these belong to Unas is not certain.

Near to the main pyramid, to the north east, there are mastabas that contain the burials of the consorts of the king.

It is believed that within the inscriptions of the Pyramid Text in Unas's tomb, there are also some lines of a Semitic dialect, written in Egyptian script and comprising the earliest evidence of written Semitic language.


From Unas, the last king of the 5th Dynasty, varying selections of spells were carved in all the royal pyramids of the Old Kingdom, particularly the sarcophagus chamber and antechamber. There were some 227 spells in the Pyramid of Unas, and each subsequent pyramid provided fresh new additions, though no single pyramid contained the whole collection of spells.

http://www.touregypt.net/featurestories/pyramidtext.htm


"Spell Central"?

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Old 17-11-2009, 01:26 PM   #8
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A search for Sekhmet, the Unas pyramid and spells quickly brings up reference to the "West Wall (* cough *) Gable."

This seems to be it here:



Okay, so this Gable has a spell on it about Sekhmet, huh?



Translator!!!!!

Utterance 248

262: To say the words:
"Unas is a great one.
Unas came out between the thighs of the Divine Ennead.
Unas was conceived by Sekhmet;
It is Shesemtet [loincloth ornament] who gave birth to Unas
(as) to a star with sharp (spd) front (hA.t), with wide stride, which brings provender for the road of Re every day.
Unas has come to his throne which is over (tp.t) the Two Goddessess (who protect Upper and Lower Egypt), and Unas appears (xaj) as a star."



OK.

So the "gable" is a spell, one of the earliest known to man, that describes how the lioness-headed goddess Sekhmet gave birth to the king...

Interesting.

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Old 17-11-2009, 01:35 PM   #9
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Interesting link, size_of_light.

(Sorry for the short reply, just wanted to suscribe to this thread).
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Old 17-11-2009, 01:36 PM   #10
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Great thread!
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I noticed this is confusing so: 'strt' is pronounced 'start', I just removed pyramid with the capstone from 'START'. OK?
Important New Song 528 Hz
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Old 19-11-2009, 04:22 AM   #11
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Default the female hindu deity kali

very interesting stuff there SOL. it made me think of the hindu female deity - it's hard not to draw parallels between the two, since both are associated with death and destruction (read bloodshed).

vedanta does not allow violence in any form, and yet the later hindu texts are rife with stories glorifying kali and ritualism associated with deity worship.



here's a brief on kali:

One of the most recognizable of all the goddesses, Kali Ma, whose name means "Mother Time" or "Black Mother" (Kali means both "black" and "time") is a fierce representation of the feminine principle Devi, whose other forms include the lovely, gentle Parvati (sometimes referred to as the creator goddess.)

Created by her mother, the goddess Durga (a form of Parvati), to conquer the demons Chandra and Mundra, Kali is also called "Chamundra." Kali enjoyed killing the demons so much, that she got carried away and began to kill everything in sight (much like the Egyptian goddess Sekhmet). Kali's husband, Lord Shiva, threw himself under her feet, and, with her spear poised to pierce his heart, Kali suddenly recognized her own beloved consort and was shocked out of her homicidal rampage, ending her killing spree.

Kali is invoked for protection and guidance-but beware! She will destroy all the old ways to make room for new ones. Kali is not subtle in her approach to life or death- she cuts through the illusions of both to bring us to a higher understanding of ourselves and our true nature purpose.



-------


i doubt if her worship today is anything to do with the destruction of 'illusion' only, but i am led to believe that most of the people who worship her do so without any knowledge of the symbolism behind it all.

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Old 19-11-2009, 04:22 AM   #12
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Kali's Destruction:


I’m not sure if other people see the similarities of Durga’s myth to the destruction myth of Sekhmet, but I see many common threads. In both cases, the male deities had become powerless to stop the threat of Chaos; there was a possibility of Divine Order being overwhelmed. In desperation, the male gods called up a female goddess, the one considered unstoppable. Durga fought very specific battles and it was Kali who sprang out of Durga to do the more extensive killing. In some versions of the Egyptian myth, Ra calls up Hathor to destroy mankind and Sekhmet arises out of her as Hathor’s fierce aspect. Only Sekhmet (never Hathor) is accused of going overboard.

Of course, it always sounds much nicer to say a goddess ripped apart demons instead of human beings. Who would not see this as a more positive role- destroying to protect humanity? If this is the assumption in Durga and Kali’s myth (since no actual humans were injured in the telling of the goddesses’ tale), remember that Durga’s destruction of the demons was done to protect cosmic order, not humanity. As for the Egyptian myth, it spoke of Ra giving the early priests some of his own power, believing the priests would use the gift to help the rest of humanity. Instead, you ended up with humans who had godlike powers, who turned their backs on the gods and began channeling Chaos– which sure sounds like demons to me.

There is another part of the Indian legend that concerns Kali. Kali confronts a demon called Rakta-bija (Blood-seed). When Kali was fighting with this demon, blood from his body would fall on the ground. From every drop of blood of Blood-seed Demon, one thousand demons would spring up. That is why he was called Blood-seed.

Some tales tell of Kali opening her mouth or spreading out her tongue to catch all the blood, drinking it up before it could hit the ground. This supposedly gave her an insatiable taste for blood, and- drunk on blood- she ran across the cosmos killing anyone who dared cross her path. Shiva stopped her killing rage by throwing himself under her feet. Only upon touching his divine form did she calm down and return to her passive form. As Durga, she was then praised by the other gods and told her victory would be worshiped yearly.

Kali, like Sekhmet, retains a tainted image in most circles. She remains the only major deity in today’s world to whom daily offerings of blood are made. I asked V.G. about Kali and the rumors of blood sacrifices and he admitted, "Many Hindus, including some Brahmins, will offer a hen or he-buffalo to the Goddess. To me, these rituals are a distortion of the symbology and mythology connected with Kali."

"It is unfortunate but true that Kali has also been associated with black magic, evil spirits, the awful practices where meat-alcohol-sex are used. Thus, the left-hand-method of worship was developed. These had their own place in proper context. But now people know about them and talk about them out of context. "

Most people in today’s world who worship Kali do not take the extreme left-handed approach. Forget the Hollywood version. Yet, I wonder if it is the nature of religion or of humanity that factions seem to continually break away from the foundation of religious worship (as originally conceived by mystics), and then initiate the most inhumane acts to justify and protect the sanctity of their beliefs.

Obviously, V.G. and I see Kali from the mystic’s viewpoint- as the destroyer of illusion, material attachments and the ego that stands in the way of spiritual enlightenment. Nothing I have seen or experienced with Kali- even in her more frightening and destructive mode- hold a glimmer of negativity.

How sad to see these higher realities distorted within today’s world. World religions speak of love and peace, yet– somewhere in history- they all seem to develop factions that justify the unleashing of members’ inner fears, hate and distrust. Perhaps the problem of left-handed paths arise when charismatic leaders begin preaching religious myths from their own state of awareness. A charismatic leader who wants power and control knows how to redirect human weaknesses. When daily life for the masses becomes challenging and confusing, left-handed paths become a means to turn inner anxiety to outer action. Those that are activated feel once more in control of their destiny. What results is a sad distortion of religion- the belief that deities are pleased when members prove faith by eliminating or stigmatizing all competition. "In the name of our deity we are justified to punish and destroy."
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Old 19-11-2009, 05:01 AM   #13
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Great info pink.

I've read a few things that indicate that Sekhmet and Kali are the same being with different names.

To me, the stories they share about being unleashed by the gods to rid the world of 'evildoers' and then getting drunk on their own bloodlust for the job doesn't make them sound like they're real aspects of enlightened energy that have taken on the form of wrathful deities to cut through delusions - it makes them sound like they're very powerful, but very flawed lower level entities with distinctly negative personal traits.

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Old 19-11-2009, 05:33 AM   #14
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i think these goddesses were first representative of both 'dark' and 'light' energy denoting the balance between good and evil or non duality. in ancient civilizations, you had gods and goddesses who represented both sides because the human spirit by itself was considered non dual in nature; so for every heroic deity, you had a corresponding 'negative' force that brought out the good in these gods, and vice versa.

i personally feel that over time the accounts of blood drinking goddesses (interesting to note that there are no blood drinking gods or male counterparts) have been glorified to justify the notion of blood drinking and mass 'culmination' as a necessary step to take in the eradication of 'evil' or 'scum/demons'. i also wonder if there was a conscious decision, an underlying motive to undermine the 'good' in female energy, and the 'dark' in male energy, and upset the harmony both forces represent... as far as deities went. the benevolent 'mother' had a horrific side to her, but a benevolent god did not have such a twisted side to him- at least not to the degree of the female gods.

for every sekhmet in egypt and kali in india, you have a reak ksaksar devy in cambodia, an empusa and lamia in greece and a lilith in mesopotamia.... i am pretty confused about lilith though, she's described as a mother goddess who brought the other goddesses to existence- but is considered demonic because she thrived on the blood of babies and mothers... parents used to try and protect their babies by making them wear amulets to ward off any attack from lilith. that's one take on her.





blood goddesses are present in almost every ancient civilization and directly associated with black magic. this is a dark practice that seeks to counteract the energy created by worship of 'good' deities.

Last edited by pinkfreud; 19-11-2009 at 05:42 AM. Reason: added stuff
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Old 19-11-2009, 06:32 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pinkfreud View Post
i personally feel that over time the accounts of blood drinking goddesses (interesting to note that there are no blood drinking gods or male counterparts) have been glorified to justify the notion of blood drinking and mass 'culmination' as a necessary step to take in the eradication of 'evil' or 'scum/demons'.
I'd go along with that. There's a lot of violent and gory imagery in the ancient texts that I think is meant to describe the actions of wrathful deities (to be understood on a metaphysical level as aspects of your own enlightened mind and not external 'gods'), and some of these teachings have probably been perverted over time into forms of external demonic worship using the names of those deities to serve different ends.

At the same time, there seems to be another category that Sekhmet might fall into (and maybe Kali, or one aspect of her), which includes powerful but unenlightened entities who are clearly originally not in control of themselves and commit all sorts of atrocities when tempted and overcome by their own lust for blood.

In the Sekhmet story, the other gods let her loose not for the good of mankind, but because mankind is challenging the authority of the gods to rule over them.

Her assignment is to kill the 'evildoers' (i.e. anyone who challenges the authority of the 'gods') which, as we all know from watching George Bush after 911, has nothing to do with truth or morality, but is merely a propaganda term to crush your opposition.

If you look at that story as something similar to a group of farmers hiring a guy to wade through their cattle culling all the unruly animals, and then when that guy develops a taste for it and goes on a rampage slaughtering all the cattle indiscriminately until the farmers can figure out a way to trick him into stopping, I think it reveals how self-serving and unenlightened that entire pantheon of gods must be.

Because when they bring Sekhmet under control and transform her in Hathor, the Goddess of Love, not only does there seem to be no expression of remorse from the gods about the innocent victims of Sekhmet's insane rampage that they themselves are responsible for, but they also praise her profusely and then leave humans with an ongoing and neverending ritual of appeasement to her to prevent a repeat episode.

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Originally Posted by pinkfreud View Post
i also wonder if there was a conscious decision, an underlying motive to undermine the 'good' in female energy, and the 'dark' in male energy, and upset the harmony both forces represent... as far as deities went. the benevolent 'mother' had a horrific side to her, but a benevolent god did not have such a twisted side to him- at least not to the degree of the female gods.
Yeah, good points. Why are all the original vampires female? Maybe for whatever reason, that's just how it was. Or maybe it has been seriously twisted to serve a patriarchal worldview.

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Old 19-11-2009, 12:38 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by size_of_light View Post
Utterance 248

262: To say the words:
"Unas is a great one.
Unas came out between the thighs of the Divine Ennead.
Unas was conceived by Sekhmet;
It is Shesemtet [loincloth ornament] who gave birth to Unas
(as) to a star with sharp (spd) front (hA.t), with wide stride, which brings provender for the road of Re every day.
Unas has come to his throne which is over (tp.t) the Two Goddessess (who protect Upper and Lower Egypt), and Unas appears (xaj) as a star."
http://henadology.wordpress.com/theo...eru/shesmetet/


Shesmetet

(Shesmet, Shesemtet, or spellings with Shez-; Hellenized as Smithis) Shesmetet is depicted as a lioness or lioness-headed woman, and is associated with a ritual girdle or apron called a shesmet, her name meaning ‘She of the shesmet‘. The shesmet is described by P. E. Newberry as “a leather belt from which were suspended narrow strips of hide ending in tassels; sometimes the girdle was ornamented with beads and cowries; sometimes the hanging pieces were decorated with Hathor-heads,” (316). The shesmet, which is worn by Gods such as Horus, Seth, Thoth, Sepa, and Amun, but which is particularly characteristic of Soped, was perhaps originally a garment for unmarried girls. Newberry cites similar garments (called rahat or hauf) among several East African peoples to the south of Egypt, which are broken by the bridegroom to complete the wedding ceremony. Moreover, Herodotus (IV. 189) compares the aegis worn by the Greek Goddess Athena to such garments, worn by Libyan women, and similar garments were once worn, according to Newberry, “by Arab girls, by women in their courses, and also, it is said, by worshipers at the Caaba,” (317). Shesmet is also the name in Egyptian for the green mineral malachite, which was used by Egyptians as an eye paint. ‘Shesmet-land’ is also an Egyptian name for an area in the eastern part of Egypt centering around Per-Soped, ‘the House of Soped’, modern Saft el Henneh, a few miles to the east of Bubastis. Significantly, this area was known in early Arab times as El-Hauf, a virtually direct translation of the Egyptian ‘Shesmet-land’ (323).

Shesmetet is paired with Sekhmet, a Goddess also depicted as a lioness, in a formula from the Pyramid Texts which was to be reused in the Coffin Texts and finally in the Book of the Dead. In PT utterances 248 and 704, it is affirmed that the deceased king “was conceived by Sekhmet, and it was Shesmetet who bore the king,” the formula going on to describe the king as “a star brilliant and far-travelling, who brings distant products to Re daily.” The operator similarly identifies himself as “the son of Shesmetet” in CT spell 310, a spell in which the operator otherwise identifies with Khonsu, suggesting some link between Shesmetet and Khonsu. In CT spell 173, the “mat of Shesmetet” is something the deceased refuses to accept, indicating that it represents some kind of corruption; it is clearly not the same as the shesmet (but recall above, the use of the rahat or hauf by menstruating women (Newberry, 317)). In CT spell 331, for “Becoming Hathor,” in a passage in which the operator assumes the wrathful aspect of Hathor, the operator states of those s/he smites, “I make warmth for them in this my name of Shesmetet,” an ironic reference to blasting them with flames. The formula from PT utterances 248 and 704 concerning having been born from Shesmetet is attached, in CT spell 485, to a spell for being in the retinue of Hathor, albeit the reference to Sekhmet has dropped out; the formula returns to its original form, however, in BD spell 66, “Spell for going forth by day,” in which the operator affirms, “I know that I was conceived by Sekhmet and born of Shesmetet,” and the whole formula, including its astral context, is carried over unaltered from PT utterance 248 to BD spell 174. Sekhmet and Shesmetet are also invoked together in a spell to protect against pestilence associated with the transition to the new year, the Book of the Last Day of the Year (no. 13 in Borghouts).

Last edited by size_of_light; 19-11-2009 at 12:40 PM.
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Old 19-11-2009, 12:53 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by size_of_light View Post
Moreover, Herodotus (IV. 189) compares the aegis worn by the Greek Goddess Athena to such garments(as the shesmet),
Aegis (pronounced /ˈiːdʒɨs/), from Greek αιγίς, is a large collar or cape worn in ancient times to display the protection provided by a high religious authority or, it is the holder of a protective shield signifying the same, such as a bag-like garment that contained a shield. Sometimes the garment and the shield are merged, with a small version of the shield appearing on the garment. It originally was derived from the protective shield associated with a religious figure when related in myths and images. The wearing of the aegis and its contents show sponsorship, protection, or authority derived from yet a higher source or deity. The name has been extended to many other entities, and the concept of a protective shield is found in other mythologies, while its form varies across sources.




Closeup of a plaster cast of a Roman sculpture of Athena wearing the scaly Aegis

The concept of doing something "under someone's aegis" now means doing something under the protection of a powerful, knowledgeable, or benevolent source. The word aegis is identified with protection by a strong force with its roots in Greek mythology and adopted by the Romans; there are parallels in Norse mythology and in Egyptian mythology as well, where the Greek word aegis is applied by extension.




Did these things have magical properties that allowed the gods to shapeshift or commune with other dimensions?

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Old 19-11-2009, 01:05 PM   #18
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Old 19-11-2009, 02:34 PM   #19
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What was the Aegis?



In Greek myth the hero Perseus kept the head of the gorgon Medusa in a special bag. He used the head on many adventures. In the Apollodorus (1st century AD) version of the myth Perseus used the head to turn king Polydectes and his friends to stone. He gives the gorgon head to Athena, and Hermes inserts the head in the middle of her shield.

In The Iliad (750-725 BC) Homer says that the gorgon's likeness appears on the aegis of Athena. Homer probably wasn't talking about a shield because he also says the gorgon's likeness appears on Agamemnon's shield. Homer also says the aegis is the thundercloud of Zeus.

Herodotus wrote (450-430 BC) that the aegis was a tasseled goatskin worn by Libyan women and that Zeus had such a skin made from the goat that suckled him. Dionysius Scytobrachion said that the Aegis was a fire breathing monster that Athena killed and skinned.

Mythology was full of conflicting stories. Different ancient people would have had different ideas about the aegis. We only have a few versions of the stories that survived. The ancients would have had more conflicting versions, not a single version that was written down incorrectly a few times. Other myths claim that Perseus didn't even give the gorgon's head to Athena. Pausanias says it's buried in an earthen mound near the Argos market. Another story (whose?) says it was brought to Iconium.

The Romans loved the image of the aegis and wore gorgoneions on their ceremonial armor on coins. For more information on the aegis with many pictures of aegis-style clothing depicted on coins see John W. Bitner's article in The Celator, June 1999.

This page is about coins where the aegis is the main device on a coin.

continued... http://www.snible.org/coins/aegis2.html
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Old 19-11-2009, 02:57 PM   #20
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good thread.

i had a dream about sekhmet, having an altar underneath a church/vatican, what could this mean. there where snakes and people/women on the altar, it was quite scary actually. in it a voice said that i had to balance the kundalini/chakras.

does anyone have any ideas of what this could mean, symbolise etc.
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