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Old 10-11-2009, 11:35 AM   #41
petercookie
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Road kill chef
pt1

pt2

pt3

pt4

pt5

pt6

..........................................

Cook on the Wild Side - hugh fearnley whittingstall

Episode 1 -
Episode 2 -
Episode 4 (i couldnt find pt3) -
Episode 5 -
Episode 6 -
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Old 10-11-2009, 11:47 AM   #42
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Wilderness Survival food - http://www.wilderness-survival-skill...vivalfood.html

Edible Wild Fruit -
http://cabd0.tripod.com/cabsmushroompage/id4.html

Wild Vegetables -
http://cabd0.tripod.com/cabsmushroompage/id11.html

Tree Guide -
http://www.british-trees.com/treeguide/
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Old 10-11-2009, 12:04 PM   #43
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I just want to add - that i have been adding videos to this thread and a few of them have just vanished?. Does anyone know why this is? ...... some videos i have put on are now not showing up or after a while they disappear.....

Ray mears - Wild food - is a good watch

................................

Cockles - http://www.worldseafishing.com/baits/cockles.html (quite tastey) -


Mussels ^ -


Common periwinkle ^ -
If you want to check the tide tables, here - http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/coast/tides/

Last edited by petercookie; 10-11-2009 at 12:27 PM.
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Old 10-11-2009, 12:55 PM   #44
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Ebook -
Ultimate guide to wilderness liveing - BY JOHN MCPHERSON AND GERI MCPHERSON

http://www.4shared.com/file/14956850...alestrom_.html

Last edited by petercookie; 10-11-2009 at 12:55 PM.
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Old 10-11-2009, 04:00 PM   #45
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Excellent thread petercookie a wealth of info nice one mate.
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Old 10-11-2009, 04:13 PM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by petercookie View Post
I just want to add - that i have been adding videos to this thread and a few of them have just vanished?. Does anyone know why this is? ...... some videos i have put on are now not showing up or after a while they disappear.....




Common periwinkle ^ - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winkle

If you want to check the tide tables, here - http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/coast/tides/
petercookie, people can still access the video links by using the Quote button and copying the link from there. I have no idea why it happens, but it does happen an awful lot on these forums.

I left the winkle picture and link because I used to love winkles when I was a kid. Many happy times with a pin and a load of winkles.
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Old 20-11-2009, 09:41 PM   #47
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http://www.plantsandhealers.com/

http://www.learningherbs.com/

http://www.wildfoodadventures.com/

http://www.wildfoodschool.co.uk/

Just some more links for people to check out.....( i hope i havent posted them in a previous post....)

Quote:
I left the winkle picture and link because I used to love winkles when I was a kid. Many happy times with a pin and a load of winkles.
Yea i know what you mean, its good when you make a nice pile.... and stuff them all down too

They are nice shellfish......only recently i have tryed some cockles and they are also very good eating, and quite easy to collect when you find a batch.....

Quote:
Excellent thread petercookie a wealth of info nice one mate.
Cheers mate......

Still trying to add more knowledge.........

Just a note here....... if anyone can reccomend any good wild food/survival/plant identification book(s) that would also be appreciated.......

when i come across new things, if i have the time and i think on, i will try to add it to this thread........... thanks for all the comments......
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Old 20-11-2009, 11:10 PM   #48
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I would build an eco house for under £800 and use natural forest permaculture to establish food resources, then i would let nature do its thing. So i would mainly eat wild foods, most my diet being in greens, around 70% of it. i wouldnt eat any meat unless for some reason there was no edible vegeation around. I would also plant things like hawthorn and rose bushes, i could eat the berries on both, the flowers on both... there are a 101 things you can do with hawthorn definatly. I think thats most my vitamins and minerals taken care of with greens and berries. Small amount of chickens and geese, currently have both and they just about take care of themselves, the geese act as guard dogs and you cant get prosecuted for your geese attacking trespassers. Geese lay feb-sep time one goose egg equals 3 chicken eggs. i could go on for pages....
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Old 20-11-2009, 11:38 PM   #49
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Well i follow god's diet, anything, seeds is a must because all food contains most of the stuff that your body needs, flak seeds are great too.
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Old 15-12-2009, 12:56 PM   #50
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Originally Posted by lyrag View Post
i wouldnt eat any meat unless for some reason there was no edible vegeation around.
I think it could be hard to get your daily calories by plants alone, but maybe with some roots and seeds which are high in calories, you could. I wouldnt like killing anything though and would prefer to be able to sustain myself on plants ect.

I would probbly include fish and shellfish in my diet aswell for extra protein.... I think a big part of it is your surrounding enviroment too...
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Old 13-01-2010, 06:37 PM   #51
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A Beginers' Guide to Edible Plant Research:

I was talking with a couple of guys on the live-chat last night who expressed that they were ready to get down to business and learn some wild edibles. I think many people shy away from the subject because it's difficult to know where to begin. There are seemingly endless numbers of species in any given region and this can look very overwhelming, not to mention all the scientific terminology and Latin involved. But in hindsight, for me at least, the process of learning edible plants isn't at all as difficult as it initially appeared.

I am a self-taught forager. I have trained myself to identify plants using only books and photographs. If you have the luxury of knowing a cooperative plant expert who lives nearby, it may not be neccesary to do your own research. A teacher is probably the safest and fastest way to learn plants. But self teaching does have it's strengths. For instance, in your quest to identify one plant, you may have to learn to identify several other plants along the way. One also picks up on the latin names much faster, making it easier to communicate with other plant people and allowing for expanded research. The self teacher can constantly and independently aquire knowledge, while a field student is stuck with what they've been told. This post is directed at those who want to learn plants on their own.

The first things you'll need are sources.

Most importantly you will need a comprehensive source such as a field guide. Field guides are available for almost every region of North America. Some encompass very large regions, some encompass smaller regions. Not all field guides are created equal- some are definitely more reputable than others, so ask around. Youre looking for a reputable guide for a specific region with concise definitions, detailed illustrations, and numerous color photos.

Many websites available today could be classified as field guides. These are often hosted by government agencies and local native plant societies. Perhaps the most notable of these is the PLANTS National Database, which encompasses the whole U.S.. A fine example of a small local site is the Central Washington Native Plant Society homepage.
There are many other great plant guides on the web, but none I have run across so far are so good that they could totally replace a hard-copy field guide. Information is constantly trickling down from books into free sources like the Internet, but the juicy stuff will always be in books. Fortunately, there are interlibrary loan systems and used books are cheap.

Once you have a field guide or two on hand, you can flip through and look at all the common plants of your region, likely hundreds of them. If you just wanted to learn the names of plants, this would be enough. But you want to learn the names and uses of plants. Most regional field guides dont cover edibility; it just wouldnt fit. If your lucky it might site the use of a few random plants by Native American groups. Youll need more sources: secondary sources, and probably even third and fourth string sources.

Secondary sources are sources that refer directly to plant use and edibility. Often these books encompass broad regions. They are specialty books, most often with mention to edible/useful plants in the title. This category also includes the plant sections of certain survival manuals. They are usually not comprehensive, and the vast majority of them include just a small sample of useful plants. So a person could successfully use only one field guide, but may need several good secondary sources. The best secondary source I can think of is a single book called Botany in a Day by Tom Elpel.

Using only a field guide and collection of secondary sources, you can begin venturing cautiously into the field of practical ethnobotany.

First, pick a hopeful plant from your secondary source. Find its Latin name. Next, look up that Latin name in the index of your field guide. The index will direct you to the description/illustration/photo of your plant. Examine all of this carefully. Compare the illustrations from both books, perhaps one is more precise. If possible, do an Internet search on the plant and look at more pictures and descriptions of it. Maybe you are already familiar with the plant; perhaps you see it every day. Or maybe you only half-remember seeing something like the plant in the woods a few years ago. In either case you should first concentrate on discovering any look-alikes. Your field guide probably mentions a few of the plants look-alikes, if there are any. But deciding whether one species resembles another is a subjective business (the author may think two plants look alike, where you can see no resemblance, or vice versa), so be sure and look through your field guide for unmentioned plants that seem like look-alikes to you. This should be relatively simple if your book is organized by flower color or families. If you are lucky, yours is a distinctive plant with no impersonators. More often, your plant has several look-alikes. Examine their descriptions carefully and compare them to that of your target plant. The descriptions of each plant should list one or more features that makes the plant unmistakable from any other. Any terms you dont know are likely in the glossary. After a few minutes of page flipping you should be able to sort them out logically. I only let my younger brother eat a plant thats new to him when he can verbalize how it its different from its look-alikes. I think this is a good rule, if you can verbalize how your plant is unique, you know you are drawing a logical conclusion.

If you can do all of this confidently, you are, in my opinion, ready to eat your plant. But only you can make that choice. Its possible to be over-confident. Once, after moving to a new area, I found some sprouting leaves I thought belonged to a young cattail plant. I thought only an idiot could mistake a cattail for anything else. I started to chew on these and found them awful and toxic tasting- nothing like cattail. I hurried back to my house spitting and wondering if I was going to die. It turns out I had eaten iris leaves, which I had never seen before. Theres always the possibility that you might be violently allergic to a plant you try. If you have a history of allergies, it would be wise to have some anti-histamines on hand and some friends nearby. After a while, you may find that you no longer need a picture or a reminder to identify a plant that you have been eating. For me, some plants have become like faces, and I recognize them instantly without analyzing their features consciously. If you asked me, I would tell you I recognize them by their general "character" and not by any specific detail. I never forget a plant I have tasted- the added sensory input seems to burn that plants "character" into my mind. Youll be amazed how easily you can absorb it all. Unlike algebra, this is a subject your brain is naturally wired to excel at. But, remember dangit, BE CAREFULL!

Earlier I mentioned third and fourth string sources. These are the names I give to sources that are less likely to contain tested information. This includes most ethnographic works, especially the earlier ones. Any title discussing plants that aboriginals used fits in this category. We cant assume that the writers know botany, and so we cant trust that the plants they saw being used have been named correctly. Many good ethnographies are dead-wrong or extremely vague about plant use. It would be stupid to rely solely on a third string source to identify a plant for eating. Instead, you should cross-reference the plant with a secondary source, and then to a field guide as I have described above. This is my system and the hierarchy I always follow, because it leaves little room for mistakes. Any time you try a plant that you cannot locate in a secondary (tested) source, you are out on a limb. Despite all of this, these sources are invaluable to the student of practical plant use, for one reason: they relate the use of plants in context to the systems used by early peoples to survive. Nobody knows how to use plants like the people who depended on them for food and medicine. If you want to learn to survive like a native, youll need as much of this kind of information as you can gather.

There is a small number of highly knowledgeable people today who are testing the limits and expanding the boundaries of ethnobotany (including Paleo Planets own Storm, who has eaten numerous lichens never before recorded as safe to eat). But this is not the realm of the beginner. You and I can wait for these brave souls to publish their findings.

Thats all I have to say about the process of identifying plants. However, I do have somewhat more to say concerning what kinds of plants the beginner will find most valuable to learn. I want to convey to you the importance of learning plant food economics, a concept first brought to my attention by Tom Elpels book Participating in Nature. If you would be a forager, start by forgetting everything the modern world has told you about calories. We live in a society where "calorie" is a dirty word. I want you to listen to your instincts. Deep in your gut you know that calories are soooo good. Your inner-caveman wants fats, sugars, and carbohydrates; and rightly so. After all, calories are merely units of potential energy, like watts or horse-power. To get your priorities straight, turn that FDA approved Food Pyramid upside-down. This is energy you will need if you are an active abo-style forager.

So we are looking for plants that have high caloric yields (fats, sugars, and carbohydrates). Not all plants and plant-parts are equal in this respect. I hate to break it to you, but unless you have a buffalo in your family tree, you do not have a ruminant digestive system. Ruminant digestive systems commonly belong strictly to herbivorous animals. It is this special digestive process that allows these herbivores to break down the cellulose found in green and woody plant tissues and turn it into sugar which their bodies can use for energy. Because humans are not so equipped, green and woody plant tissues hold little or no potential energy for our bodies. This means leaves, potherbs, and salad greens (while full of vitamins and minerals) are poor candidates for fueling your bodys energy needs. Its crucial that the practical plant users understand this, because around 90% of plants known to be edible are edible only as greens. Its great to have a repertoire of tasty greens, but plant food economics tells foragers to focus more of their energy on other kinds of plant food. It is probable that you will pick up plenty of edible greens as you go, almost every nature-lovin person you run into knows an salad green or two.

The fist high-calorie nutrient I mentioned was fat. In the vegetable world, we find fat in the form of oils. Though there are exceptions, such as olives and avocados, oils are going to be found in the form of nuts and seeds. Nuts and seeds = good caveman food. Nuts are generally a late-season food. Some are tedious to extract and shell and others are ridiculously easy to process. Good wild food nuts I am familiar with include acorns, pine-nuts, and hazelnuts. If you live in the Eastern U.S. or Coastal California you are in Nut Central- nuts could be a big part of your abo-diet. Seeds were more commonly sought in the Great Basin and the Great Lakes region (when I say Great Lakes I am thinking specifically of wild rice). Seeds must be Great. The worlds great agricultural civilizations have made seeds such as wheat, rice, and corn their staple foods. The seeds of most grasses are edible (read about the dangers of ergot fungus before you consume grass seeds), and there are many other plants notable for their good seeds. My favorite seed plants include amaranth, indian ricegrass, and balsamroot. Another great Western seed plant is the water lily, which provided the staple "wocas" for the natives of Central Oregon. Most seeds have a short harvesting period and require complex processing methods, so one must be careful to invest time only in the most abundant and convenient species.

The second high-calorie nutrient I mentioned was sugar. Where is Mother Natures sugar? This one should be obvious, because its what most people and bears instantly think of when they think edible plants: BERRIES! Fruits and berries are the best. Possibly the most wonderful way to feed yourself is to mull around scarfing berries. Fruits and berries are mid to late-season fare, though many species can be dried and stored. Most are edible without any preparation. Learn all the berries you can! Later, Ive included a list of my regions, common edible berries.

The last high-calorie nutrient I mentioned was carbohydrates. Carbs have been getting a bad rap lately, but I dont understand it. Carbs are the preferred fuel of endurance athletes of all types. Carbohydrates are found in commonly overlooked plants and plant parts such as roots, tree cambium, and lichens. Root plants were a staple food of the Plateau region of the Inland Northwest where I live. Roots where a big deal here, constituting over half of some native diets. Consequently, I am root-crazy (see my some of my root posts for more information than you would ever want to know). There early, mid, and late season roots. Roots are difficult to dig and sometimes require cooking (study inulin containing roots), but they are good solid food that wont give you diarrhea. Roots can also be dried and stored. Ive included a list of my regions common edible roots later in this post. Especially if you live in the Inland Northwest, I recommend you learn some good roots. Cambium is basically the inner bark of a tree. It is not the type of food embraced by our modern culture, so eating it can be an adventure. Its chewy, in fact, a lot more chewy than swallowy. I guess its good to know if your desperately hungry. Some edible cambiums I am familiar with include: most true pines, western hemlock (the tree), and cottonwood. Lichens also contain carbs, but the only good one that comes to mind is black tree moss, used widely by Northern Indians.

Those are the three big categories of high-calorie plants. A more complete set might include a category for fungi, which I have not yet taken the opportunity to learn well. One last idea on plant economics has to do with the investment of time and energy. When you forage, you must harvest more calories than you expend. When average Americans harvest fewer calories than they expend, its called dieting. When hunter-gathers do this, its called dying. If you are working hard, youd better be eating big. Making a caloric profit requires wise choices in foraging. The obvious choices are those species that are high-calorie, abundant, and easy to process. The tough choices are between available species that have tedious or complex processing requirements. In these cases, detailed knowledge and experience dealing with the utilization of specific species makes all the difference. For instance, I was out doing the abo thing one time, and one of the only foods available to me were Squaw Currants. Had I not known this little trick, I might have passed up the mediocre tasting fruits, but instead I harvested more berries than I could eat, all in a few minutes, by spreading my shirt under the bush and beating the weakly attached berries out of the bush with a stick. I separated the fruits from the leaves and extra crud by emersing them in water and straining off the floating crud. If you know enough little tricks like that, feeding yourself can be a breeze. Getting a feel for which species are the most economical in your situation is something you have to learn first-hand. A mere book-knowledge of edible plants creates a false sense natures super-abundance. If you just know how to provide yourself with a wild trail-snack now and then, its like only knowing how to buy chewing gum in the checkout aisle of a grocery store. The real shopping is done when you have the knowledge and skills to provide yourself with wild meals for days at a time. I dont know about you, but thats the level I want to be at. Thats plant food economics.

As promised, here are those lists. The nearer you live to me, the more useful they might be to you. I intended for them to be a starting point for further research. They are certainly not complete lists; Im sure I overlooked a few good ones. Quite a few species require cooking or other processing to make them edible, so do your homework. Youll notice that sometimes I use only the genus name, such as Ribes spp. This indicates that all species within that genus are edible (some more palatable than others, illustrated well by Ribes). In these cases, if you can recognize the genus, you dont necessarily need to know exactly what species you are dealing with. I include some specific members of the Lomatium genus because, while most are edible, at least a couple are debatably poisonous. Be careful with Umbells in general.

Fruits:

Amelanchier spp./Serviceberries
Crataegus spp./Thornapples
Prunus spp./Cherries
Rubus spp./Raspberries and Blackberries
Ribes spp./Currants and Gooseberries
Fragaria spp./Strawberries
Berberis spp./Oregon Grapes
Rosa spp./Rosehips
Arctostaphylos spp./Kinikinnicks
Vaccinium spp./Huckleberries and Blueberries
Sambucus cerulea/Blue Elderberry
Cornus canadensis/Red Osier Dogwood
Opuntia spp./Prickly Pears

Roots:

Allium spp./Onions
Triteleia spp. and Brodiaea spp./Hyacinths
Calochortus spp./Sego Lilies
Camassia spp./Camas
Balsamhoriza spp./Balsamroots
Circium spp./Thistles
Claytonia spp./Springbeauties
Hydrophyllum spp./Waterleaf
Lomatium spp./Biscuitroots
L. canbyi
L. cous
L. farinosum
L. gormanii
L. grayi
L. marcocarpum
L. minus
Oenthera spp./Evening Primroses
Trapopogon spp./Oysterplants
Scirpus spp./Bulrushes
Typha spp./Cattails
Perideridia spp./Yampahs
Erythronium grandiflorum/Yellow Glacier Lily
Fririllaria pudica/Yellowbell
Lewisa rediviva/Bitteroot
Lilium columbianum/Tiger Lily
Polygonum bisttortes/Bisort
Arctium minus/Burdock
Xerophyllum tenax/Beargrass

Well, that was a LONG post! It's probably all no-brainer stuff to some of the amazing botanists who constantly answer our questions on this forum. But I hope I have given new confidence to those who have always wanted to learn. To those folks, I wish you the best of luck. I hope I can meet you in the field someday!

Later, when I have the time and ambition, I will add a some web links and some book titles. Thanks for reading!

-Kyle
This was a good post which i read on another forum and i thought id put it on here. If you want to read the other posts in reply to this post go here - http://paleoplanet69529.yuku.com/top...ch.html?page=1

(Its a excellent forum for survival skills/wild food ect)

Power to the people...................
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Old 14-01-2010, 11:28 AM   #52
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brilliant stuff again , thank you for the info .


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Old 14-01-2010, 02:18 PM   #53
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I have just found these websites and had a brief look and they look good so i thought i would add them for all you wild food addicts -

http://www.complete-herbal.com/
http://www.weedyconnection.com/
http://www.prodigalgardens.info/index.htm
http://naturallore.wordpress.com/page/9/
http://huntergathercook.typepad.com/

P.s dont be killing your neighbours with yew berrys
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Old 14-01-2010, 07:58 PM   #54
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I've done a few courses at River Cottage HQ over the years (I got them as gifts) and although I found out that there's a huge number of pricks employed down there.. one of the instructors resonated with me.

You know, down to earth and not full of corporate bullshit!

I posted one of his links before and am gonna post a few more now.



http://www.wildforage.co.uk/
http://www.cookeryschoolcourses.co.uk/
http://www.catchandcook.co.uk/



I'm seriously thinking of taking everybody who works for me on one of his courses.

What do you think?



I also reckon we could get a fair group rate for a forum meet up to do a bit of Wild Foraging if enough people in here like the look of it!?
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Old 15-01-2010, 09:18 PM   #55
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made a thread with pics of the development of my own allotment here;

http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showthread.php?t=99591


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Old 17-01-2010, 07:29 PM   #56
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Hi, thank you for your kind words. Its refreshing for some one to be so honest with there vocabulary, as I read once that the Buddhist say " speak the truth and install truth in others" some thing I always try to maintain when passing on information, or teaching courses. (possibly not conducive with the modern corporate approach) but thats not sustainable (it can make you rich and famous though) Fuck that!

Hope you can make some of my new courses, and I would be pleased to accommodate any group bookings. Get in touch.

Be prepared, be safe, be happy!

Fraser
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Old 17-01-2010, 07:42 PM   #57
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Originally Posted by petercookie View Post


I have just found these websites and had a brief look and they look good so i thought i would add them for all you wild food addicts -

http://www.complete-herbal.com/
http://www.weedyconnection.com/
http://www.prodigalgardens.info/index.htm
http://naturallore.wordpress.com/page/9/
http://huntergathercook.typepad.com/

P.s dont be killing your neighbours with yew berrys

Might just sub them to the survival forum if its ok with you .






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Old 17-01-2010, 09:38 PM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by them View Post
I've done a few courses at River Cottage HQ over the years (I got them as gifts) and although I found out that there's a huge number of pricks employed down there.. one of the instructors resonated with me.


You know, down to earth and not full of corporate bullshit!

I posted one of his links before and am gonna post a few more now.




I'm seriously thinking of taking everybody who works for me on one of his courses.

What do you think?



I also reckon we could get a fair group rate for a forum meet up to do a bit of Wild Foraging if enough people in here like the look of it!?
I'd be up for this, give me a shout.
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Old 18-01-2010, 01:43 PM   #59
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Originally Posted by coastal_survival View Post
Hope you can make some of my new courses, and I would be pleased to accommodate any group bookings. Get in touch.

Be prepared, be safe, be happy!

Fraser
No problem and welcome to the forum!

If I try and send you a private message I get this

Quote:
Originally Posted by DIF
coastal_survival has chosen not to receive private messages or may not be allowed to receive private messages. Therefore you may not send your message to him/her.
you need to edit your settings I think, unless you set it that way, lol.

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I'd be up for this, give me a shout.
Which one did you like the look of?
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Old 18-01-2010, 01:53 PM   #60
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Originally Posted by tracker View Post
made a thread with pics of the development of my own allotment here;

http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showthread.php?t=99591


I've had a look, great stuff! Looks like you've got the hang of posting your pictures too




What's this plant? I thought it was an Artichoke at first glance.
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