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Old 11-07-2012, 09:05 AM   #21
edostar
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Originally Posted by pi3141 View Post


So if you were using vaporised petrol..

Litres per min?

Its worth working out.

If combining diesel and lpg gives an increase, a vaporised petrol gas in a petrol engine should also give a rise in performance, as would HHO gas. The question is, how much is needed to make a difference.
Thanks pi3141.

HCS starts as vaporized gasoline but is cracked at high temperatures (exceeding 250C) into Hydrogen and Carbon in the copper tube wrapped around the exhaust pipe.
It is not 'super-vaporied fuel' as some have speculated.

HHO is produced in necessarily limited quantities onboard a vehicle; limited due to the capacity of the alternator which is only designed to recharge the battery occasionally.
The alternator takes power from the engine which cancels out many of the gains expected from the hydrogen input.

HCS places no such burden on the engine and the copious quantities of heat produced by the exhaust pipe means that the amount of Hydrogen produced is potentially far greater than the engine could possibly use.

The Hydrogen works as an 'expansion medium' and a burn enhancer and has been found to be very effective on both gasoline and diesel vehicles where mileage increases are frequently in excess of 30%.

The bubbler fuel is usually consumed at less than 5% of the regular tank fuel and increases the efficiency of the engine enormously.
The gains are not just greater mileage per liter; but also increased power, a smoother, quieter, cooler run to the engine and sharply decreased exhaust emissions.

In addition to this; it can be constructed from locally bought parts very cheaply and easily in a couple of hours.
No specialist spare parts or expert bench skills are required.
It's really kindergarten stuff as anyone who has put it into practice can testify.

I can't see why anyone would want to remove it once fitted but if they did; the engine could be returned to factory standard with ease.

Dan.

Last edited by edostar; 12-07-2012 at 12:26 AM.
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Old 15-07-2012, 08:18 PM   #22
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Finally got it installed on my GFs 1l corsa..I didnt have a valve so just let it bubble flat out..I dont know how many MPG the car did before but today we did a journey that would normally use 10euro and then drove an extra 20km and we had been driving round town all week and the light still isnt on after putting a tenner in
So far so good..


I dont get why the adjustible valve is used to stop too much engine gasses but why?

And on the test drive I booted it up the bypass and easy touched 80mph without trying..Normally its pedal to the metal to do that.
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Old 16-07-2012, 07:42 AM   #23
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Hi H2pogo.

Good to hear that you've installed HCS on your vehicle and are having fun testing it out.
If you're using PCV pressure; the screw valve is to relieve surplus pressure and thereby control the amount of pressure that flows through the HCS.

If you open the relief tap wide; no pressure will reach the bubbler as it will all be ventilated beforehand.
If you close the valve shut (effectively what you've done by not fitting one at all) then all the available PCV pressure will go through the HCS.
This feeds a lot of hydrogen to the engine which may be okay.

It will also mean that the only way to relieve the PCV gases is through the HCS which may not be able to conduct all of them due to small bore pipes.
If this is the case; then the pressure in the crankcase will not be adequately ventilated and oil will begin to be forced out of the crankcase gaskets.
Check for drips of oil under the car after you've been driving it around.

If this is not happening; then presumably your HCS is managing to ventilate all the pressure without a problem.
If the car is running okay on that quantity of added hydrogen; then that's not a problem either.

If I were you; I'd drop by an aquarium store and buy a screw-valve and a 'T' joint and fit a ventilation control so that you can regulate the system.

I find that a primary adjustment gives minimal bubbling through the bubbler tank at engine idle.
Thereafter; all additional pressure at higher engine revs is ventilated through the HCS.

Anyway; it sounds like the HCS is working as you are getting higher performance and extra mileage from your vehicle running this simple, home-made system.

Dan.

Last edited by edostar; 16-07-2012 at 08:23 AM.
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Old 22-07-2012, 07:49 AM   #24
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Default HCS installation on a Yamaha scooter.

HCS installation on a Yamaha Mio.




This is an HCS installation that I made on a friend’s Yamaha Mio which is a 125cc 4-stroke step-through automatic.

As I had no idea whether a suitable venturi vacuum could be located; I went for the easy option which is the PCV pressure operated HCS.
I found the PCV outlet (A) easily as it was conveniently located on the front of the engine and was identifiable as the connecting pipe ran directly to the air filter.
I disconnected this pipe at the engine and fitted one end of a piece of petrol pipe to the PCV outlet.
The other end of this pipe was to go to the petrol tank which I intended to double as a bubbler tank.




I wound a length of copper pipe (D) around the exhaust pipe at its hottest point in readiness for connection to the rest of the system.

The black petrol pipe (C) is carrying fuel vapour from the petrol/bubbler tank and the dark grey pipe (B) is carrying the resulting Hydrogen and Carbon gases to the air filter.
Fortuitously; I could utilize the old PCV pipe that I disconnected from the PCV outlet as it was already connected to the air filter.

Up at the petrol tank; I decided to fit the ‘PCV in’ and ‘Fuel Vapour out’ pipes to the fuel level float unit.
Some people use the fuel cap but this is less convenient for the user when refilling the petrol/bubbler tank.




This was an easy job and I just drilled two small holes through the plastic face plate of exactly the same size as the copper pipes to be inserted which fitted very snugly indeed and formed a seal against petrol leakage.
To be absolutely sure; I added a spot of glue once the installation was complete.

The grey pipe (E) is carrying the PCV gases and branches via the ‘T’ connector to the PCV relief screw valve (F) and to the ‘PCV in’ copper pipe (G) which extends down into the tank to well below the surface of the fuel.
The copper pipe (H) is short and takes the resulting fuel vapour to the copper heat tube (D) and the cracked Hydrogen and Carbon on to the air filter via the (B) tube in the previous photo.

The entire installation took me about an hour and used materials that I bought at local stores for a total of just $4.00

My friend drove this motorcycle from Java the day before and used 8.5 liters of fuel.

After fitting HCS; he drove the return journey (taking the same route) and used only 4.5 liters of fuel.

He reported a smooth, quiet ride with sharply increased power and torque.

Dan.

Last edited by edostar; 22-07-2012 at 11:13 AM.
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Old 13-08-2012, 03:40 PM   #25
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I am impressed! Good work and thanks for showing us what you did.
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Old 14-08-2012, 04:27 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by h2pogo View Post
Finally got it installed on my GFs 1l corsa..I didnt have a valve so just let it bubble flat out..I dont know how many MPG the car did before but today we did a journey that would normally use 10euro and then drove an extra 20km and we had been driving round town all week and the light still isnt on after putting a tenner in
So far so good..


I dont get why the adjustible valve is used to stop too much engine gasses but why?

And on the test drive I booted it up the bypass and easy touched 80mph without trying..Normally its pedal to the metal to do that.
Hi, you have this system on corsa? You have some pictures of that? I have opel meriva and I'm interested in installing this. Especially I would like to know where do you take PCV (I assume you have Z14XEP or similar engine)?
Thanks for your answer.
Best regards
Zarko
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Old 15-08-2012, 01:14 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edostar View Post
Hi H2pogo.

Good to hear that you've installed HCS on your vehicle and are having fun testing it out.
If you're using PCV pressure; the screw valve is to relieve surplus pressure and thereby control the amount of pressure that flows through the HCS.

If you open the relief tap wide; no pressure will reach the bubbler as it will all be ventilated beforehand.
If you close the valve shut (effectively what you've done by not fitting one at all) then all the available PCV pressure will go through the HCS.
This feeds a lot of hydrogen to the engine which may be okay.

It will also mean that the only way to relieve the PCV gases is through the HCS which may not be able to conduct all of them due to small bore pipes.
If this is the case; then the pressure in the crankcase will not be adequately ventilated and oil will begin to be forced out of the crankcase gaskets.
Check for drips of oil under the car after you've been driving it around.

If this is not happening; then presumably your HCS is managing to ventilate all the pressure without a problem.
If the car is running okay on that quantity of added hydrogen; then that's not a problem either.

If I were you; I'd drop by an aquarium store and buy a screw-valve and a 'T' joint and fit a ventilation control so that you can regulate the system.

I find that a primary adjustment gives minimal bubbling through the bubbler tank at engine idle.
Thereafter; all additional pressure at higher engine revs is ventilated through the HCS.

Anyway; it sounds like the HCS is working as you are getting higher performance and extra mileage from your vehicle running this simple, home-made system.

Dan.
Thanks for your intelligent response, The breathing seemed fine so i went for it..I revved it up and took the oil cap off and there was no pressure so i presumed its all good.
I got a tap now, but the bottle kind of melted so am driving without the system working and getting some MPG figures to compare with.

Will keep you posted.
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Old 15-08-2012, 01:21 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by zarko007 View Post
Hi, you have this system on corsa? You have some pictures of that? I have opel meriva and I'm interested in installing this. Especially I would like to know where do you take PCV (I assume you have Z14XEP or similar engine)?
Thanks for your answer.
Best regards
Zarko
Not sure of the engine code..Its a 1l three cylinder efi engine.
The breather comes straight out the top into the air intake which is right behind, I took off the short breather and put some bungs with holes with brake hose sticking out.

I will try and get some picks when i have it reinstalled.
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Old 18-08-2012, 02:55 PM   #29
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Hi All.

FYI - NASA Study - 1977

Quote:
EMISSIONS AND TOTAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION OF A MULTICYLINDER PISTON ENGINE RUNNING ON GASOLINE AND A HYDROGEN-GASOLINE MIXTURE

Link - http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/ca...1977016170.pdf
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Old 06-09-2012, 08:38 PM   #30
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^good find.

I did some tests and now have reinstalled..I was getting average 44mpg without and and 55mpg with..I am impressed
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Old 07-09-2012, 08:45 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by h2pogo View Post
^good find.

I did some tests and now have reinstalled..I was getting average 44mpg without and and 55mpg with..I am impressed
hi, could you give us some pictures of yours installation? I have similar engine...
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Old 08-09-2012, 06:33 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by h2pogo View Post
^good find.
Cheers!

I also found this which I think is proof of principle that a vaporised fuel can power an engine.

Quote:
The Hornsby-Akroyd oil engine was the first successful design of internal combustion engine using 'heavy oil' as a fuel. It was the first to use a separate vaporizing combustion chamber and is the forerunner of all hot-bulb engines.

Link - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hornsby-Akroyd_oil_engine
Basically, they started with oil in a chamber, which they heated with a blow torch to vaporise it and get the engine running. Once it was running the exhaust heat continued to vaporise the oil for fuel. That was heavy oil, so of course petrol would also work.


Quote:
I did some tests and now have reinstalled..I was getting average 44mpg without and and 55mpg with..I am impressed
That is impressive.

I reckon you can find some useful figures by clocking how much fuel you put into vapor chamber compared with your regular fuel. If your using between 2% and 5% of petrol converted to vapor compared to your main fuel tank then I reckon you are getting some real results.
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Old 25-06-2013, 11:11 AM   #33
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EGR - Exhaust Gas Recirculation

Just seen it on telly! Eddie Stobarts truck show, they are buying new trucks from Sweden with EGR, the exhaust gasses gets recirculated and burnt a second time. Reduces emmisions by 80%.

I does this by re-burning the Hydrocarbons in the exhaust, therefore it must produce more energy.

I've said before, they discovered this with the jet engine afterburner, in that system it is using up wasted fuel, but a) its the same in a car engine, some fuel is unburnt and b) Hydrocarbon based gas is a fuel, whether its exhaust or intentionally produced as in the hydrocarbon crack system like this thread.
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Old 29-01-2019, 03:54 AM   #34
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