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Old 30-03-2016, 03:15 PM   #21
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(On a related note, this article among other things covers how British black musicians and audiences are perceived, and the expectations placed upon them to conform to a restricted identity. That restricted identity has meant a lack of musical substance and messages of any worth. From 2006 but still of relevance.)
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Bumping up your own threads now Imani?

I never even heard of this female singer DJ "Nesha" before this thread - so perhaps that explains why she's now complaining - to get publicity for herself?

"There is no master conspiracy in anything, not even governments. Everything is just some kind of vaguely organized chaos." John Lydon from his book: "Rotten: No Irish, No Blacks, No Dogs."

I think there probably is more of an agenda with Radio one since about mid to late 2000's in which the music radio one plays is very restricted and limited to a certain wave length of this auto-tuned electronic based music and it's all got that same metallic - scratchy sound bla! They would never play the Wurzels on Radio One today.

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Old 30-03-2016, 03:31 PM   #22
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Bumping up your own threads now Imani?

I never even heard of this female singer DJ "Nesha" before this thread - so perhaps that explains why she's now complaining - to get publicity for herself?
I bump lots of different threads, including my own. Nothing wrong with that.

Listening to the interview, I never got the impression that it was mere publicity seeking; I could think of far easier ways to get publicity to develop a career than by publicly knocking the likes of the BBC.

All she's saying is the grass isn't greener on the other side, and she details it from experience. I've no problem with that at all, and I applaud it. Better that than some air-headed starstruck idiot saying how wonderful it all is - we've got enough of them.

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Old 31-03-2016, 03:18 PM   #23
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I bump lots of different threads, including my own. Nothing wrong with that.

Listening to the interview, I never got the impression that it was mere publicity seeking; I could think of far easier ways to get publicity to develop a career than by publicly knocking the likes of the BBC.

All she's saying is the grass isn't greener on the other side, and she details it from experience. I've no problem with that at all, and I applaud it. Better that than some air-headed starstruck idiot saying how wonderful it all is - we've got enough of them.


She does talk some sense - but there are others at the BBC who rose to the top and made it work for them such as Dave Pearce who was a DJ in the early 80's into Hip Hop and then as new dance styles emerged he was into that as well and he's survived, he was one who jumped ship from pirate radio stations when Radio One decided to get hip in the early 90's) - so either he was clever playing the game or pure Illuminati man (put there by an agenda hand selected to play the records they wanted him to play? No freedom in it!) Even then in late 80's early 90's it was much more varied the type of dance music that was being produced much less so than today.


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Old 31-03-2016, 05:45 PM   #24
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Interesting interview. I agree with much of what was said but have a few reservations. The pop music biz has always run on the theme sex sells records. In the 50's, 60's, 70's up to and including the 80's that was imo necessary as the western world was uptight about sex and people wanted to rebel against that in a myriad of ways. Since then the mantra sex sells hasn't changed but the goalposts have, merely because equilibrium was somewhat obtained yet the record industry still wants to sell records and sex sells is it's mantra.

So, I guess this takes us beyond natural normal randy sex into the extremes. I wouldn't say that was satanism, but there's probably a few satanist in the record industry into that. Just where the lines between art and deviance and agenda are I don't know. Whilst music and art often reflect our obsessions with carnality and the lust for power I can’t but think that without music and art all we’d be left is carnity and the lust for power. Art and music make us more than animal.
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Old 31-03-2016, 06:04 PM   #25
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It's a balancing act. Listening wise I'm not keen on everything being soapbox 'fight the system' any more than I want to hear overtly sexual songs all the time - even though that has been going on since the days of Bessie Smith.

Though focusing people on a mainly hedonistic animal level is one way of controlling them, and it's a 'non-threatening subject'. R. Kelly singing about bumping and grinding poses less of a threat than if it was something more on the lines of 'What's Goin' On'.

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Old 31-03-2016, 06:07 PM   #26
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Expanding on my previous reply, I guess the non western world has, via TV and internet been suddenly thrust into the aftermath of 50 years of sexual revolution in the west. Not a pretty sight to non western eyes.
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Old 31-03-2016, 06:17 PM   #27
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Expanding on my previous reply, I guess the non western world has, via TV and internet been suddenly thrust into the aftermath of 50 years of sexual revolution in the west. Not a pretty sight to non western eyes.
Funny you mentioned that. I was thinking about how a lot of the female dance moves in r&b, dancehall etc are West African-based. It's just that in their original tradition, those moves might have more of a function. There are dances women would do to help them give birth with less pain, dances to mark different stages of growth in their rites of passage system, for courtship, even to promote fertility of the womb. All of that was largely lost among the Africans brought to the west, so in the western context it's something dirty. It's just that there's no real socially accepted expression of sexuality in mainstream western culture. In a way, the world of music has been the only outlet.

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Old 31-03-2016, 06:24 PM   #28
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Funny you mentioned that. I was thinking about how a lot of the female dance moves in r&b, dancehall etc are West African-based. It's just that in their original tradition, those moves might have more of a function. There are dances women would do to help them give birth with less pain, dances to mark different stages of growth in their rites of passage system, for courtship, even to promote fertility of the womb. All of that was largely lost among the Africans brought to the west, so in the western context it's something dirty. It's just that there's no real socially accepted expression of sexuality in mainstream western culture. In a way, the world of music has been the only outlet.
Yeah, I expect a lot of what is deemed unacceptable is misunderstood. Being quick to judge is unfortunately a trait most of us have.
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Old 01-04-2016, 10:50 AM   #29
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Yeah, I expect a lot of what is deemed unacceptable is misunderstood. Being quick to judge is unfortunately a trait most of us have.
It comes down to ignorance, in the purest sense - lack of information.

If the interview highlights one thing, it shows that we can't tar everyone who's worked at the BBC with the illuminati brush.
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Old 01-04-2016, 11:41 AM   #30
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brilliant interview, nice one Nesha.
The black eyed peas where is the love came to mind from the start. American Idiot was against the grain too but didn't get a mention.
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Old 01-04-2016, 02:44 PM   #31
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She does talk some sense - but there are others at the BBC who rose to the top and made it work for them such as Dave Pearce who was a DJ in the early 80's into Hip Hop and then as new dance styles emerged he was into that as well and he's survived, he was one who jumped ship from pirate radio stations when Radio One decided to get hip in the early 90's) - so either he was clever playing the game or pure Illuminati man (put there by an agenda hand selected to play the records they wanted him to play? No freedom in it!) Even then in late 80's early 90's it was much more varied the type of dance music that was being produced much less so than today.
I don't know what Dave Pearce used to play. I wouldn't put his success down to any 'funny handshakes' - but I'd say dance music being instrumental would have made it more harmless.

I'm sure he's great at what he does but things also come down to race. At that time, a white dj would have more chance of breaking through in the BBC than a black one, even if the black dj was prepared to go down that Gaga playlist path. The audience for dance music by that time was more young and white, of course.

When the Beeb first brought in people such as Trevor Nelson and Ranking Miss P to play soul and reggae, they were always given really bad time slots, such as late Sunday night or even weekdays graveyard shift. Whereas the dance music show was for many years on just after teatime on a Friday evening, prime time. In the same way as black artists playing reggae and soul didn't receive the same budget and media exposure as white ones, unless they watered down their message and sound.

This isn't going down the 'white privilege' route, but undeniably there was racial politics at work - this is just how it was in the mainstream, and in some ways still is.

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Old 02-04-2016, 11:04 AM   #32
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I don't know what Dave Pearce used to play. I wouldn't put his success down to any 'funny handshakes' - but I'd say dance music being instrumental would have made it more harmless.

I'm sure he's great at what he does but things also come down to race. At that time, a white dj would have more chance of breaking through in the BBC than a black one, even if the black dj was prepared to go down that Gaga playlist path. The audience for dance music by that time was more young and white, of course.

When the Beeb first brought in people such as Trevor Nelson and Ranking Miss P to play soul and reggae, they were always given really bad time slots, such as late Sunday night or even weekdays graveyard shift. Whereas the dance music show was for many years on just after teatime on a Friday evening, prime time. In the same way as black artists playing reggae and soul didn't receive the same budget and media exposure as white ones, unless they watered down their message and sound.

This isn't going down the 'white privilege' route, but undeniably there was racial politics at work - this is just how it was in the mainstream, and in some ways still is.
All those DJ's like Dave Pearce, Tim Westwood, Trevor Nelson, Pete Tong, Fabio and Grooverider (black guys who had a late night drum and bass slot) Tim Westwood, Judge Jules, Danny Rampling. All made their names on the underground pirate radio stations of the 80's such as Kiss FM (which was given a license in 1990) LWR etc most of them were poached by Radio One approximately 1992-93 when the station management slowly kicked out all the golden oldie presenters like Simon Bates and that was the wave that made Radio One appeal to that dance/rave generation of that time. In recent years (I can't say exactly how many years) but then all those DJ's were replaced by younger trendier DJ's and now have all gone - so that cutting edge music they played at the time is now labeled Old Skool rap or hip hop or rave or what ever you want to call it? And now Radio One is very strict in it's play list with it's current crop of trendy DJ's.

You mention that the black DJ's were given late night slots - well Normski (remember him?) had a prime time TV program slot that ran for a couple of years called Dance Energy. But there was a black DJ on Kiss FM who I thought would end up on Radio One but he didn't in fact his style was very Chris Moyles before Chris Moyles - like taking the piss out of people who rang up on air. Infact Steve Jackson later claimed he was sacked from Kiss FM (under new management) for the exact reasons you stated read article here:

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/1999/aug/18/race.world

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Old 02-04-2016, 11:36 AM   #33
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All those DJ's like Dave Pearce, Tim Westwood, Trevor Nelson, Pete Tong, Fabio and Grooverider (black guys who had a late night drum and bass slot) Tim Westwood, Judge Jules, Danny Rampling. All made their names on the underground pirate radio stations of the 80's such as Kiss FM (which was given a license in 1990) LWR etc most of them were poached by Radio One approximately 1992-93 when the station management slowly kicked out all the golden oldie presenters like Simon Bates and that was the wave that made Radio One appeal to that dance/rave generation of that time. In recent years (I can't say exactly how many years) but then all those DJ's were replaced by younger trendier DJ's and now have all gone - so that cutting edge music they played at the time is now labeled Old Skool rap or hip hop or rave or what ever you want to call it? And now Radio One is very strict in it's play list with it's current crop of trendy DJ's.

You mention that the black DJ's were given late night slots - well Normski (remember him?) had a prime time TV program slot that ran for a couple of years called Dance Energy. But there was a black DJ on Kiss FM who I thought would end up on Radio One but he didn't in fact his style was very Chris Moyles before Chris Moyles - like taking the piss out of people who rang up on air. Infact Steve Jackson later claimed he was sacked from Kiss FM (under new management) for the exact reasons you stated read article here:

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/1999/aug/18/race.world
I remember the restructuring, and it was more to do with going with trends than anything else. Yes you're right about Normski. And shows such as Real McCoy were an exception. That was a period when groups such as Soul 2 Soul were doing really well not just nationally but globally, and I think the BBC wanted a bit of that zeitgeist. There's been little since, however, unless you count 1xtra - but don't tell Nesha.

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