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Old 02-11-2009, 11:00 PM   #21
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some nice yarrow or killer hemlock ?

http://www.horsedata.co.uk/images/Plants/hemlock.jpg

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Old 02-11-2009, 11:01 PM   #22
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ROAD KILL...

Lately, quite a few people have been asking me about roadkill. So I’m going to say a few words about it. Not that I eat it that much. At most it constitutes 1-5% of my diet throughout the year. Also, I would rarely if ever actively go out searching for it. Nevertheless, what I do want to say about roadkill is in large measure addressed by this wonderful video that I found on the web recently. Have a look first before we get down to some waffle and something more useful: the practicalities and pitfalls of roadkill eating.

Why eat roadkill? Why indeed?! Does eating roadkill simply represent a somewhat quirky or peculiar dimension to the forage/freegan/self-sufficient lifestyle? Maybe. For me it’s a simple equation: I love animals therefore I don’t eat them (roadkill excepted). I don’t want them killed for me to eat, nor do I wish to kill them. Of course, no doubt a strong intellectual argument could be used to support this position on moral grounds, or we could talk about it from a spiritual point of view, relating it to such concepts as karma and ahimsa– maybe some other time. The truth is I am sentimental; it’s an emotional thing. Huge Fearnley-Whittingstall has written about roadkill (see his A Cook on the Wild Side p.47) and about meat in general. See, for instance.

His position is one that I can understand and respect. His emphasis is on good animal husbandry, welfare and respect and, although you may think that, ultimately, killing an animal for food is not in the least bit respectful of that animal it can, in a sense, be so - at least relatively speaking. For me the least hypocritical position, and the position that gives you the greatest connection to, and understanding of the animal you wish to consume, is to only eat animals that you yourself have hunted and killed. Emotionally, though, I cannot do it! Perhaps, though, the future is heading not towards a reconnection with the food, including meat, that we eat, but a radical and horrific disconnection. Is this what we really want?

Anyway, occasionally I do like to eat meat. Also….., the fact is, I am very fond of our native wildlife and am extremely distressed at the number of animals and insects needlessly killed every day – needlessly killed due to human greed, recklessness, laziness, lack of awareness or concern and general environmental exploitation and mismanagement. At the same time, I find myself similarly distressed and concerned by our consumer society’s insatiable thirst and craving for cheap but, again, relatively speaking, nutritionally valueless, food. And so, two ideas collide and generate a surprising idea: eat roadkill. It’s not factory farmed or pumped full of antibiotics. It is fresh, local, seasonal and nutritionally rich. The most common finds are pheasant, squirrel, rabbit, fox, hedgehog, badger, moorhen, hare etc. This is certainly the case where I live, in Kent. And, really, it’s not so unusual to be eating such things – historically anyway. In his book British Food: An Extraordinary Thousand Years of History, Colin Spencer records, amongst other things, the regular consumption of badgers, door mice, rats, hedgehogs, song thrush, blackbird, wheatear and sparrow throughout the Middle Ages (p.15). These days it is only fairly arbitrary, though powerful, dietary taboos that prevent us from eating such creatures. I recently delved in to a book by Frederick Simoons called Eat Not This Flesh: Food Avoidances from Prehistory to the Present. It discusses a number of such common taboos and is well worth reading.

What’s good to eat and what’s not:

The best places to find roadkill are on stretches of road that you travel along daily. If it wasn’t there the previous day then it’s probably good to eat today. But, for goodness sake, don’t put your foot down to deliberately try and kill something. In fact if you are walking or cycling roadkill is easier to find. This is because many animals when hit are injured rather than killed outright. Consequently, they manage to reach the cover of grass and shrub by the roadside. Some animals, even if killed on impact, though dead, manage to kick their way into the grass verge by the sheer force of their spasmodic death throes. The slower pace of walking or cycling allows such animals to be noticed. Specimens need to be intact and, at the height of summer, not more than a day old; that time extending to three to four days in the colder winter months. If there is fresh blood on the road, this is a sign of recent death and, hence, freshness. Similarly, with respect to birds, if there are feathers blowing around the road this is the sign of a recent hit. In my experience – although I stand to be corrected – rigor mortis tends to set in 6-12 hours after an animal is killed. So, if you pick an animal up and it is as stiff as a board but still plump and fresh looking, this is a good sign. Also, if on a cold day the animal feels warm then, clearly, this is a strong indicator of recent death. Bad signs include: dull looking eyes, rotten smell, visible maggots or fly eggs around the eyes mouth/beak, rupture of the intestines, signs of sickness, or, suspicious death. If you see 5 badgers on the road within 200 metres, chances are a farmer is illegally killing them and putting them on the road to look like roadkill. Of course, some animals may have been legally poisoned, so it is worth asking local farmers if they are using poisons. As for bird flu…….I need to look into this.

Finally or perhaps it should be, firstly, before even considering inspecting a dead road-side animal for eating it is sensible to familiarise yourself with certain relevant laws, especially the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.

http://wildmanwildfood.blogspot.com/.../roadkill.html
...
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Old 02-11-2009, 11:01 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by petercookie View Post
Thats the question.

say you come into a situation where you had to totally rely on liveing off the land, how would you do it(food wise, even add how u would make shelters ect if you want)?.

this is a sort of imagination thing, where you can think what you would do and post it here. Where would you go?, what would you do?, and most importantly what would you eat?

I am no expert on this and have been thinking that if you had to rely on wild food, one of the main things you would need is food high in carbs, like roots and nuts mostly. what roots are the best nutritionally speaking???

PROTEIN AND GREENS-
I think i would mostly try to fish for my protein and collect shell fish. For vitimans and greens i would eat nettles, dandelion, red clover, ramsons, and mix in other edible leaves (although not to tasty, they are edible - like red valerian, rosebay willowherb ect

ROOTS AND NUTS-
Now for the roots and carbs it is the difficult question, i only know afew edible roots and that is, catstail, burdock, dandelion, goatsbeard,thistles. Nuts i would go with acorns and hazel nuts, walnuts, beech nuts but the thing with nuts is that they are a seasonal thing, mostly only available in the winter time and for a short period.

FRUITS- i nearly forgot about fruits, blackberry/bramble, hawthorn berrys, wild cherrys, apples, plums...

Does anyone know any wild foods which are the high in calories?

WE NEED FOOD HIGH IN CALORIES........(panics)

I am mostly talking about uk wild food here but add what ever you want.....
I hope you dont mind but I have put this thread up on a survivalist link .

its on a thread called
"ultimate thread of threads/ survivalism "

I just thought that it seems to be in this area so to speek .


its about half way down the page under the --------------things that can affect home and country survival variouse ---------section .
http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showthread.php?t=89528


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Old 02-11-2009, 11:03 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by sannox View Post
some nice yarrow or killer hemlock ?

http://www.horsedata.co.uk/images/Plants/hemlock.jpg

Doesnt look like yarrow to me.

And when i have just quoted it, it says hemlock.
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Old 02-11-2009, 11:05 PM   #25
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I hope you dont mind but I have put this thread up on a survivalist link .

its on a thread called
"ultimate thread of threads/ survivalism "

I just thought that it seems to be in this area so to speek .


its about half way down the page
http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showthread.php?t=89528
I dont mind at all tracker, The more info people get the better. Its a good thread you have done there too, alot of good info that ill have to have alook through one time.

Last edited by petercookie; 02-11-2009 at 11:07 PM.
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Old 02-11-2009, 11:12 PM   #26
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I dont mind at all tracker, The more info people get the better. Its a good thread you have done there too, alot of good info that ill have to have alook through one time.
Im very interested in growing ones own food .
I have made a thread called "handy tips for alottment users"and always like experimenting with the "Food for free" from colin gems .
its about how there are 1000s of wild food stuffs in the UK .
Im working on getting one for Canada and America and Iceland .

I love natural food .
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Old 02-11-2009, 11:30 PM   #27
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This is also a good book which i reccomend -
This is also good -
Quote:
Im very interested in growing ones own food .
I have made a thread called "handy tips for alottment users"and always like experimenting with the "Food for free" from colin gems .
its about how there are 1000s of wild food stuffs in the UK .
Im working on getting one for Canada and America and Iceland .

I love natural food .
I do too.
I am quite new to it all though tbh but still trying to learn and add more knowledge.

More knowledge is more options eh....
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Old 02-11-2009, 11:46 PM   #28
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Eating Bugs

Whenever I tell someone that I teach Wilderness Survival, the first thing they seem to ask is, "Do you eat BUGS?!!!".

If the gods are smiling on me, I'll spot a likely meal crawling, buzzing, or sliming it's way along and I eat it. That stops the questions about bugs.

Sometimes I wish that I did something else for a living...

Bug eating is not at the top of my list of fun things to do. However, when I see the faces of folks as I munch a big GREEN tomato bug, or harvest some JUICY maggots, I feel a little better about the practice.

Moths, regular old "fly into the light" moths, are pretty good. They taste a bit like almonds. Grasshoppers, dried or fried, are kinda like chalky potato chips or cheese puffs on steroids. Live grasshoppers kick like hell and can give you worms, the kind you probably wouldn't eat.

If you are going to eat bugs it is best to cook them first...

From a survival point of view, is there any reason to eat bugs?
Let's take a BRIEF look...

* BEEF provides 200 - 300 calories per 100 Grams depending on the fat level. Each gram is about 18% fat, about 18% protein and about 58% water

* LIVE TERMITES provide about 350 calories per 100 Grams. With 23% protein, 28% fat and 44% water per gram they constitute good eats.

* MOTH LARVAE provide about 265 calories per 100 Grams. They are about 63 % protein and 15 % fat with only about 4% water per gram. These are good if you want to get into body building on a budget.

Do you want to decrease the fat in your diet? Eat Moths.

Another Bug

There is another issue. A cow weighs 1000 to 2000 POUNDS. A moth weighs a few mg's. It takes a lot of moth killing to make a meal.

Of course there is always the happy Maggot... that's a different story... Easy to capture, often found in clusters, high in calories and protein. Properly prepared they taste and look like wild rice.

From the standpoint of a survival food, bugs make a lot of sense as a food of opportunity. Unfortunately lots'O folks won't take that opportunity and feed on the crawly critters. It's a bit of the "Gag Factor" that stops them.

A third Bug

To use bugs as a food source you first need to get over your "Inculcated societal food values" (Food preferences) and start munching. But don't start by trying to choke down those juicy cockroaches (215 calories, 100grams). Start by buying some mealworms from a pet food store. Fry them and eat 'em... I think you'll find that they are quite tasty.

If you don't blow chunks this first time, try something a little more exciting. Place a LIVE mealworm in your mouth and BITE DOWN. Yummy. Eat more live ones. Soon you'll find yourself grazing on live mealworms, they're that good!

You may find that they are SO good you'll be offering them to friends as a snack at parties. Then you'll be just like me... "Do you eat Bugs???!!!!"

One recipe I learned to enjoy... The Montegnards of the Central Highlands in Vietnam would catch crickets, put them in a container which had a 2 inch strip of oil painted on the inside. The oil kept the little buggers :>) inside the jar. The little guys would hang out inside the jar for about 24 hours. This gave them a chance to empty their intestinal tracts (the cause of some bitterness in the flavor). After they were "clean" they were dumped into a cloth bag which was then hung by a fire to dry (cook slowly) or left in the pot and heated in situ on a slow fire. When dried they were munched as a tasty snack or used in rice meals. Grass hoppers are prepared in the same way but it is best to pull the legs off before the feast.

In any case, either bug (or most bugs) can be crushed and added to stews. This disguises the appearance and reduces the spew factor.

Ants are, for the most, part one of the best bug feasts. The formic acid pretty much disappears when they are boiled. Black ants eaten raw have a semi sweet flavor. Sorta like crunchy raw sugar with legs. We use them to sweeten ephedra tea.

Bees and wasps are OK eaten after a good boiling. The poison is basically a protein which disassembles at boiling temperatures. The stinger softens. Pounding them before boiling is effective. Bee and Wasp Larvae are delicious!

One of the most dangerous insects is in the cantharides family (blister beetles). I doubt that you will run into those unless you pop over to the Mediterranean just to munch bug. There are of course many cautions... Just a note. Beetles amount to about 40% of the known insects. The larvae of many beetles are very high in fat and protein and make great snacks.

When in doubt about a bug do the insect safety test. And follow these time tested rules.

Always try to cook insects.

Never eat bugs you find dead.

Don't eat bugs that bite back!

If it smells really bad, don't eat it!

More Bugs

One last thought. If you have a strong stomach... or at least a clear spew zone for a Technicolor yawn... try maggots. Road kills are often infested with them. Gather a handful or two, drop your prize into an old sock, and rinse in cold clear water a couple of times. Then boil. After about five minutes, toss in a bullion cube. When the cube has finished dissolving, settle back to a fine hot stew of what looks like brown rice. It is really a fine meal.

http://www.survival.com/html/bugs.html
...
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Old 03-11-2009, 12:03 AM   #29
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Old 04-11-2009, 04:55 PM   #30
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Wild food of the uk - Ebook -
http://www.4shared.com/file/14627788.../wildfood.html
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Old 04-11-2009, 05:02 PM   #31
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This is a wonderful thread .


Im still clicking the links ------theres loads ofem .
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Old 04-11-2009, 05:58 PM   #32
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Ye all can consume american soil anytime...mhmm tastes like liberty.
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Old 04-11-2009, 06:19 PM   #33
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I want to create a thread about wild food in the uk. Mix alot of diffrent things in together. I am mostly focusing on wild plants/trees/ but you can add what ever you want, animals, shellfish ect.

well that idea rocks !



still clicking away on these links -----they are brill !
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Old 04-11-2009, 06:42 PM   #34
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Petercookie, I recently discovered that the fruit of the Cherry Laurel (Prunus laurocerasus) is edible when ripe but the seed is poisonous. I have a very 'mature' specimen in my garden, which I was considering removing to make more space and light for productive use. It produces a prodigeous amount of fruit, the bees seem to love it and I'm glad I took the time to research because it makes lovely pie filling.

I also discovered that the flesh of the Yew (Taxus baccata
) berry is edible too, with it's seed also being poisonous. This discovery came courtesy of a Thrush that perches on my redundant TV aerial and 'planted' a seed in the gap between the drive and wall of my house! Obviously the original has to come out but I've taken some fair sized cuttings as it is a very slow growing species. Thrushes love Yew berries and as nature gave it to me it would be churlish not to keep it.

Nature provides so much if we take the time to notice it. I love this thread, thank you.
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Old 05-11-2009, 03:56 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by tracker View Post
well that idea rocks !



still clicking away on these links -----they are brill !
Cheers mate

Quote:
Petercookie, I recently discovered that the fruit of the Cherry Laurel (Prunus laurocerasus) is edible when ripe but the seed is poisonous. I have a very 'mature' specimen in my garden, which I was considering removing to make more space and light for productive use. It produces a prodigeous amount of fruit, the bees seem to love it and I'm glad I took the time to research because it makes lovely pie filling.

I also discovered that the flesh of the Yew (Taxus baccata) berry is edible too, with it's seed also being poisonous. This discovery came courtesy of a Thrush that perches on my redundant TV aerial and 'planted' a seed in the gap between the drive and wall of my house! Obviously the original has to come out but I've taken some fair sized cuttings as it is a very slow growing species. Thrushes love Yew berries and as nature gave it to me it would be churlish not to keep it.

Nature provides so much if we take the time to notice it. I love this thread, thank you.
Thanks elixirsoo, its good to know that there are people intrested.

I have eaten a few yew berrys, or to be more precise The flesh of the fruit, and they taste allright too. But has you have said, you do have to be abit careful because the seed is poisonous. Thanks for the info about the Cherry Laurel too, ill have to check it out.

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Old 05-11-2009, 03:59 PM   #36
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Ray Mears - Ebook
Outdoor Survival Handbook: A Guide To The Resources And Materials Available In The Wild And How To Use Them For Food, Shelter,Warmth And Navigation
- http://www.4shared.com/file/14638012...ival_Book.html

Quote:
Based on Mears's BBC2 survival series, this guide explains both to groups and individuals, the everyday skills required to live in and enjoy the natural world without violating it. Topics range from constructing a natural shelter, building a fire and orienteering, to identifying medicinal herbs.

Last edited by petercookie; 05-11-2009 at 04:07 PM.
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Old 05-11-2009, 11:07 PM   #37
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Quince


Rowanberry / Mountain Ash - Most believe these are poisonous, they are quite bitter and may cause stomach upset if large quantities taken. I have read that if you keep them in weak vinegar solution for 8 - 12 hours, or boil before use, they can make exceptional jams, syrups, wines and soups.


Crab Apple


^^^^
All 3 above contain toxins in their seeds and possibly also in their leaves, but not in their fruits. All fruits are quite bitter and hard (in the uk anyway) so maybe best to cook before consumption.
http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Cydonia+oblonga

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Old 06-11-2009, 11:55 PM   #38
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Cheers wakeup2nwo

i have tryed rowan berrys and they didnt taste that good at all lol.

Quote:
I have read that if you keep them in weak vinegar solution for 8 - 12 hours
I will have to try that.

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Old 09-11-2009, 08:57 PM   #39
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Shepherds Purse ^ - http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants....bursa-pastoris





Fat hen ^ - http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants....nopodium+album



Chickweed^ - http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants....stium+fontanum



Juniper^ - http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants....perus+communis



Cloudberry^ - http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants....us+chamaemorus



Cowslip ^ - http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Primula+veris
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Old 09-11-2009, 09:10 PM   #40
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Primrose^ - http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants....imula+vulgaris



Pyramidal orchid^ - http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants....is+pyramidalis



Thrift^ - http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants....meria+maritima



Blackthorn^ - http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Prunus+spinosa
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