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Old 26-12-2015, 01:07 PM   #1
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Default The truth is rushing out there: why conspiracy the

(edit, headline didn't fit in the title, it reads: The truth is rushing out there: why conspiracy theories spread faster than ever )

There's an interesting piece on The Guardian today:
http://www.theguardian.com/world/201...ster-than-ever

Quote:
From 9/11 to the Paris attacks, from Ebola to Isis, every major global event attracts a corresponding counter-narrative from the ‘truthers’, some so all-encompassing that they take over people’s lives. Are our brains wired to believe, as a new book argues? And could such thinking actually be beneficial?
The article itself seems a bit bunk where it cites a study -- suggesting people who "believe in conspiracy theories" are more susceptible (which is nonsense), believing everything you are told without questioning it, is the sign of susceptibility.

It's a good read though for an MSM editorial, and the comments below it raise some important points. I thought it was a good read.

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Old 26-12-2015, 01:10 PM   #2
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Excellent article thanks for posting.
Rob Brotherton's outstanding book can be ordered via the link in my sig below...
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Old 26-12-2015, 02:25 PM   #3
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Most of these theories are just that, theories with no good evidence to back them up. If anything people should admit when they are wrong about these things and move on
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Old 26-12-2015, 04:00 PM   #4
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Most of these theories are just that, theories with no good evidence to back them up. If anything people should admit when they are wrong about these things and move on
Very true, but given a case such as 9/11 and the commission that followed... that report only upholds the belief that is was an orchestrated attack. There is more counter-evidence as to how the events played out that day forcing any sane-rational person to question it.

The same as for the assassination of JFK, and the assassination of Princess Diana. I would call these the big 3; being events that almost everybody is aware of at some point in their life, revolving around state-sponsored murder killing their own.

These (and many other events) have not been proven or dis-proven, on both sides of the argument. It certainly doesn't help when a state figurehead is crippled in a car accident, the ambulance 'takes her alive', and then it's claimed she died in the car crash. All whilst her husband gets a waiver from the inquiry and has no requirement to be investigated for her memos relating along the lines of "i think my husband is going to try and kill me in a car crash".

It's probably better to start using the term "critical thinking" as opposed to "conspiracy theories". The other day i was talking to someone and mentioned theoretical physics, they jumped in and said "don't go down that route, i'm not interested". Not sure what they meant, but then went on to say theories are for crazy people. The word "theory" has been abused by psy-ops changing most peoples image of what the word relates to.

Gravity is JUST a theory. Quantum mechanics is JUST a theory. Relativity is JUST a theory.... but we live by them each and every day, affecting our lives 24/7, 365 days a year.

Everything is just a theory until proven incorrect, and that goes for any inquiry or report or commission following disasters, terror attacks or murders. They are all theories.

I say this, because -- alot of the time, many people are said to be wrong when a commission (such as 9/11) says they are wrong. If somebody wants to continue looking to fill the holes in a story, that's a good thing. It is critical thinking.

We wouldn't have computers or any technology if nobody thought "what if" and tried to explain why or how something might happen. I would say it's human instinct. Like a primitive urge, to find out why, what, when and how. Whether it's the theory of everything, or the theory of how a government flew planes into a building, it's worth thinking about until you can disprove it for yourself.

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Old 26-12-2015, 04:11 PM   #5
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When is a conspiracy not a conspiracy, when they point to the facts in hand, never has a conspiracy done any harm to anyone, but the harm they point to are easily recognisable.
If the MSM would only show footage of the devastation conspiracy theorists point to there would be no more conspiracy.
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Old 26-12-2015, 05:59 PM   #6
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The writer David Shariatmadari, on twitter. He has 'sharia' in his name.

Is there anything we can do to stop conspiracy theories taking over the world? Yes. Read on http://www.theguardian.com/world/201...ster-than-ever



https://twitter.com/D_Shariatmadari/status/680706690413629440?ref_src=twsrc^google|twcamp^ser p|twgr^tweet
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Old 26-12-2015, 06:24 PM   #7
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Being a typical zio-Guardian journalist, there's a lot of shite in his article. Well done there, zio-Guardian. Zionism has nothing to do with judaism or jews. Zionism hides behind judaism, in order to push forward its agenda, and securing protection for its activities.

David Shariatmadari gets an expert on the case, but note that no studies have been done. This has to be a new low. We are more accustomed to experts who have done crooked studies.

Quote:
It’s not that belief in conspiracy theories is becoming more widespread, says Viren Swami, professor of social psychology at Anglia Ruskin university: while the research hasn’t been done yet, he tells me, there’s lots of anecdotal evidence to suggest that belief in conspiracies has remained fairly stable for the last half-century or so. What has changed, however, is the speed with which new theories are formed. “It’s a symptom of a much more integrated world,” he says. The internet speeds everything up, allowing conspiracy-minded individuals to connect and formulate their ideas. In contrast, it took months for theories about Pearl Harbor to develop.
Prof of social psych is now using anecdotal evidence such as? No mention? What's he using? Tapped phone chats? Orbituaries? What he's heard his aunts say each new year or something?

He eventually moves on to bring in the CT-busting work of some knob named Rob Brotherton. Where do they get these names from? Rob's written a shitty anti-CT book, and really, this article is probably there to push sales for it.

Quote:
That’s also the view of Rob Brotherton, whose new book, Suspicious Minds, explores the traits that predispose us to belief in conspiracies. He cautions against sitting in judgment, since all of us have suspicious minds – and for good reason. Identifying patterns and being sensitive to possible threats is what has helped us survive in a world where nature often is out to get you. “Conspiracy theory books tend to come at it from the point of view of debunking them. I wanted to take a different approach, to sidestep the whole issue of whether the theories are true or false and come at it from the perspective of psychology,” he says. “The intentionality bias, the proportionality bias, confirmation bias. We have these quirks built into our minds that can lead us to believe weird things without realising that’s why we believe them.
He goes on to describe all the 'nutters' who aren't buying his masters' stories:

Quote:
This intentionality bias, Brotherton says, can be detected from early childhood. “If you ask a young kid why somebody sneezed, the kid thinks that they did it on purpose, that the person must really enjoy sneezing. It’s only after about the age of four or five that we begin to learn that not everything that everybody does is intended. We’re able to override that automatic judgment. But research shows that it still stays with us even into adulthood.”
But look what he spews next:

Quote:
For example, studies have shown that when people drink alcohol, they are more likely to interpret ambiguous actions as having been deliberate. “So if you’re at the pub and somebody jostles you and spills your drink, if it’s your first drink, you might write it off as an innocent mistake. But if you’re a few drinks in, then you’re more likely to think they did it on purpose, that it was an aggressive act.”
Study done on kids and a study done on drinkers. How terribly identical to the situation of citizen being cornered by the war on terror, by the use of false flags. It's like Jedward.


They go on to rubbish another lone CT, and then say:

Quote:
Karen Douglas is wary of rubbishing all conspiracy theorising as dangerous. “Thinking in that way, it must have some positive consequences. If everybody went around just accepting what they were told by governments, officials, pharmaceutical companies, whoever, then we would be a bunch of sheep, really”. On the other hand, the effects of certain theories on behaviour can be damaging. Douglas’s own research [pdf download] has shown that exposure to the idea that the British government was involved in the death of Princess Diana reduced people’s intention to engage in politics. Similarly, subjects who read a text stating that climate change was a hoax by scientists seeking funding were less likely to want to take action to reduce their carbon footprint. And anti-vaccine conspiracy narratives make people less likely to vaccinate their children, a clear public health risk.
There you have it. CTs act to reduce the pliability and susceptibility of the sheeple. Dreadful! We can't have that!


Moving on, seeing as the Guardian and its nutty fake experts can't quite abolish CTs, they come up with:

Quote:
Swami found that people who had been encouraged to think analytically during a verbal task were less likely to accept conspiracy theories afterwards. For him, this hints at an important potential role for education. “The best way is, at a societal level, to promote analytical thinking, to teach critical thinking skills.” But that’s not all. When people have faith in their representatives, understand what they are doing and trust that they are not corrupt, they are less likely to believe in coverups. That’s why political transparency ought to be bolstered wherever possible – and corporate transparency, too. “A lot of people have trouble accepting a big organisation’s or government’s narratives of an event, because they’re seen as untrustworthy, they’re seen as liars,” argues Swami.
Good luck with that Swami tit, enlighten us on the truth, go on. I love where he says that political transparency ought to be bolstered, it reveals that transparency IS lacking. Everyone harps on about critical thinking, and when it IS applied to their lies, then it's a CT. Oh fuck off.

And don't think me a dickhead for being profane, if it's good enough for bubble head Brian Cox wat went to space in his dreams, then it's good enough for me.

We all love a happy ending. Former wannabe CT turned sheeple again:

Quote:
“That was the epiphany, really. I was free. I was happy. None of the doom and gloom predicted and promised ever came.” For Ryan, by then 27, the bizarre ride was over. A world that pitted him against the forces of evil had all the appeal of a spy drama. But real life was less like a story – and in some ways more depressing. What does he think are the forces that really shape things? “Most of what is wrong in the world nowadays – well, I would put it down to incompetence and greed. A lack of compassion.”
Biggest load of shite ever. Once you've looked into the abyss you can never go back. Never, ever. You CAN ignore it, once you're saturated and tired, but you never ever go back to thinking that politicians are in any way unable to effect terrorism on a domestic and global scale. This tit never did do any reading on his own, he spent his time trying to get his info on the cheap i.e. from his mate. Lazy brains are not likely to do too well with connecting the dots. And as for happily ignoring the truth....hmm....impossible for me and most of the people I know on this forum....
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Old 26-12-2015, 06:29 PM   #8
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The moron named Rob Brotherton who wrote a shitty anti-CT book, got ONE sane review on amazon.co.uk.



Quote:
ByLee Collinson 1 December 2015
Format: Hardcover
“Suspicious Minds” is a silly book that sets out to dismiss all conspiracy theories (and by extension all conspiracies) as the product of hyperactive brains.

As a psychologist, the author Rob Brotherton can’t just dismiss conspiracy theorists as intellectually lazy or dull. He admits that there is no evidence to support the view that those who believe in conspiracy theories are somehow intellectually inferior to those who don’t. If anything, as suggested by recent research, conspiracy theorists are more intellectually adventurous than the sceptics. Otherwise put, they are more prepared to think outside the box than others. Crucially, they also tend to believe in a personal quest for enlightenment and in finding the truth for themselves. All this makes conspiracy theorists sound like rather reasonable folk.

The problem seems to be that while they reject beliefs and behaviours prescribed by the Establishment they tend to be open-minded and ready to embrace unorthodox stuff that is disagreeable to the Establishment like alternative medicine, astrology, mysticism, “alien and heretical religion”, revisionist history and Creationism. The funny thing is that religious beliefs like Creationism (the belief that the physical world is a creation of God) used to belong to Establishment culture. The fact that it is now seen as “anti-Establishment” only shows how far the Establishment has moved to the political and cultural left. As a result those who believe in Creationism and/or in conspiracy theories are indiscriminately branded “irrational” and “backward-thinking crackpots” by sceptics like Frances Wheen and other progressive bien-pensants. Brotherton himself, despite his belief that “we are all conspiracy theorists” is not a fan of conspiracy theories. Examples he uses to militate against them include The Protocols of the Elders of Zion and the Bilderberg Group.

The problem with the Protocols (a document allegedly showing a Jewish conspiracy to take over the world), Brotherton says, is that there are no Elders of Zion and that the document is a fake. No matter that this doesn’t prove that no conspiracy exists, be it by “Jews” or others. To Brotherton’s mind there can be no connection between events like the French and Russian revolutions and the two world wars and this settles the matter.

Brotherton shows no interest in finding out. He uses the Protocols to dismiss all other conspiracies. He sticks to his belief that conspiracy theories tell us more about “our own secret selves” than about what’s going on in the world. The Bilderberg Group and other cases are brushed off in the same uncritical manner. Apparently, conspiracy theorists interviewed by him at the 2013 Bilderberg Festival came up with an array of allegations ranging from the assassination of J F Kennedy to global warming to the British royal family to child abuse (page 120). Any plots by Bilderbergers, Brotherton implies, must be just “conspiracy theory”.

Had he taken the trouble to read the papers at the time, he might have found that the main accusation against the Bilderberg Group was that it was a kind of forum for a shadowy world government (Daily Mail, 6 June 2013). Considering that founding members like Denis Healey have admitted that the group aims to achieve a “united global governance” and that Bilderberg membership encompasses leading VIPs, politicians and billionaires who between them dominate or control much of the world’s finance, economy and politics, it can’t be too far-fetched to suspect that the group might have something to do with running the world.

The fact is that true conspiracies do exist. Conspiracy is a category of crime in law, defined as an agreement between two or more persons to engage in activities resulting in injury or loss to others. As shown by historians and researchers like Carroll Quigley (“The Anglo-American Establishment”), Ioan Ratiu (“The Milner-Fabian Conspiracy”) and others there is mounting evidence supporting the belief that there is such a thing as a conspiracy by secret and not-so-secret cabals to take over the world and rob us of our freedom.

The Russian Revolution and the resulting Bolshevik tyranny is just one example. Given that the Bolshevik takeover was an actual event it can’t be dismissed as “theory” or as the product of the “shadowy recesses of our mind”. Ditto the European Union and its progressively dictatorial policies that benefit a few to the detriment of many, etc. Brotherton’s transparent attempt to lump real events with “Elvis is alive” claims is preposterous and undignified.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/product-revi...owViewpoints=0
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Old 13-01-2016, 09:20 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slackpenguin View Post
(edit, headline didn't fit in the title, it reads: The truth is rushing out there: why conspiracy theories spread faster than ever )

There's an interesting piece on The Guardian today:
http://www.theguardian.com/world/201...ster-than-ever



The article itself seems a bit bunk where it cites a study -- suggesting people who "believe in conspiracy theories" are more susceptible (which is nonsense), believing everything you are told without questioning it, is the sign of susceptibility.

It's a good read though for an MSM editorial, and the comments below it raise some important points. I thought it was a good read.
Thanks - having a good laugh at these smug "evidence based researchers" having their own self congratulatory laugh in at your link.
http://www.theguardian.com/science/a...ies-david-icke
I feel sorry for all the good meaning people who are completely taken in by the gatekeeping Guardian newspaper. You'd be better off reading the Daily Mail for your fake news and hoaxes.
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Old 13-01-2016, 09:30 PM   #10
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one ploy i have noticed with the naysayers is that they speak about 'conspiracy theorists' and their belief in 'conspiracy theories' and how someone must be of a certain psychology to believe in 'conspiracy theories'

The problem with that is that those are all blanket statements and one size does not fit all. Some conspiracies are true and have been proven to be true by declassified documents

So really if these guys were going to be intelllectually honest they would agree that each theory must be examined on its own merits. some theories will be false, some true and some partially true. To write off any questioning of the ofical line as the pursuit of mental deviants is....well we know what it is...it's disingenuous and terrible journalism
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Old 14-01-2016, 12:25 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by iamawaveofthesea View Post
one ploy i have noticed with the naysayers is that they speak about 'conspiracy theorists' and their belief in 'conspiracy theories' and how someone must be of a certain psychology to believe in 'conspiracy theories'

The problem with that is that those are all blanket statements and one size does not fit all. Some conspiracies are true and have been proven to be true by declassified documents

So really if these guys were going to be intelllectually honest they would agree that each theory must be examined on its own merits. some theories will be false, some true and some partially true. To write off any questioning of the ofical line as the pursuit of mental deviants is....well we know what it is...it's disingenuous and terrible journalism
Exactly, these cover all articles are clearly completely ridiculous and appear to anyone with any sense of critical thinking as an extremely shallow attempt to once again link that word conspiracy with being something that is unproven or untrue.

The definition of conspiracy is people coming together to conspire to commit some heinous act. Whether 911 was done by Saudi terrorists or the CIA, it was done by a group of people conspiring to bring them down, it was a conspiracy either way. It just shows how deep the mainstream cultural programming runs that even the definition of the word has essentially been changed by constant media whitewashing and linking every government conspiracy to the ones that are so ridiculous that they tar everything else they contact.

There are so many US/UK/Western conspiracies that have been proven true throughout the years, but the media would far rather have you believe that it is only brown governments that could possibly have something against its own people. All you have to do to see that history is littered with examples of governments screwing its own people over is search the term true conspiracies and you will find ample evidence for a multitude of proven conspiratorial acts such as: Tuskegee, Project MK-ULTRA, Operation Paperclip, Hillsborough, Operation Northwoods. All from this link:

http://i100.independent.co.uk/articl...ue--xJeose5tlZ

Far more in depth list of proven conspiracies here:

http://www.infowars.com/33-conspirac...n-should-know/

I know I am largely preaching to the converted here, but that some people on this forum are backing the original article is bizarre at least, suspicious at worst. The US government has apologised for some horrific experiments on people in the past, what makes you think the current one is any better? Lol if I type government into google "government conspiracy" is the 3rd search term! I've never searched that term but google knows me so well. Pretty much every big story of the last few years has been exposing mass conspiracy. Fifa, Saville, Phone hacking, WMD's the list is endless.
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Old 14-01-2016, 01:04 AM   #12
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The biggest conspiracy is that the overwhelming majority of peaceful people in the world are living in terror, persecution, fear, oppression because of a few rotten apples.

And those rotten apples don't want us to know about it.

Everything else stems from this fact, I believe.
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Old 14-01-2016, 10:41 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by helloperator View Post
The biggest conspiracy is that the overwhelming majority of peaceful people in the world are living in terror, persecution, fear, oppression because of a few rotten apples.

And those rotten apples don't want us to know about it.

Everything else stems from this fact, I believe.
yes that is one layer

So then Icke having laid out who those people are and how they operate has moved on to asking why they do what they do

And he is saying that there are dark and unseen forces at play

A modern psychologist might just say that they are 'psychopaths' and leave it at that. That explanation would say that there are a lot of people with deficient brains that hurt people as a result

Icke speaks about a malevolent force beyond the realm of visible light that is manipulating things with a purpose in mind...to feed off the misery caused
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Old 14-01-2016, 11:47 AM   #14
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It's a fact that 911 is a conspiracy (because of the dictionary definition (subversive act..2 or more people))

And still Gnome Chumpsky denies it...lol #gatekeeper
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Old 14-01-2016, 04:36 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slackpenguin View Post
(edit, headline didn't fit in the title, it reads: The truth is rushing out there: why conspiracy theories spread faster than ever )

There's an interesting piece on The Guardian today:
http://www.theguardian.com/world/201...ster-than-ever



The article itself seems a bit bunk where it cites a study -- suggesting people who "believe in conspiracy theories" are more susceptible (which is nonsense), believing everything you are told without questioning it, is the sign of susceptibility.

It's a good read though for an MSM editorial, and the comments below it raise some important points. I thought it was a good read.
I am always amused when I find a piece of double speak.
Quote:
people who "believe in conspiracy theories" are more susceptible (which is nonsense), believing everything you are told without questioning it, is the sign of susceptibility.
Surely, those who believe everything they are told would never get past the official narrative of any event. This message is brought to you be the same people who advised us that, "sometimes, you have to fight for peace". Lol.

Love
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Old 14-01-2016, 05:03 PM   #16
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I feel sorry for whoever wrote that, paid shill or stupidly ignorant... what a sad meaningless existence!
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Old 14-01-2016, 05:50 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by triplej View Post
I feel sorry for whoever wrote that, paid shill or stupidly ignorant... what a sad meaningless existence!
Brotherton has been paraphrased...
Quote:
“Some people are more susceptible to [intentionality bias] than others.” And, Brotherton explains, there is a small but reliable correlation between that susceptibility and belief in conspiracy theories.
I think I can paraphrase Brotherton -
If you question anything which comes to you directly from the BBC, CNN, The Daily Mail, The Guardian, you need your head examining.

Me? I'm straight off now Goldsmith's College Anomalistic Psychology Research Unit* to have a brain scan.
*http://www.gold.ac.uk/calendar/?id=6707

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Old 14-01-2016, 07:03 PM   #18
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In simple terms the truth resonates with people.
The media and other official sources produce an official narrative which causes cognitive dissonance in people.

Go with what your heart says, your head is constantly being messed with. But your heart has to be open first.
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Old 14-01-2016, 07:21 PM   #19
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Seems like quite a trend at the moment to diss conspiracies and theorists. It seems to be coming, quite predictably, from that section of society which is still in the protection zone, ie they are being leant on to play the sheepdog in the hope it wont be their ass next. I would love to believe there were no conspiracies and our Governments and establishment worked in the interests of us all and anything else is pure paranoia. If fucking only. There is a definite push to make any kind of questioning of the dark practices behind the scenes appear like madness or at best, harmless fruitcake nuttiness, be it George Monbiot, the London Spy film and other sections of the relatively "left" media. They are being targetted now to shut down voices who are merely sounding the warning bells of what is to come, imo.

I can see both sides. Looking at the world through conspiracy eyes also makes you feel like youre burdened with some kind of responsibility to point things out to people who dont want to listen...it would be nice to be free of it. Maybe if we all refuse to see conspiracies, ie refuse to give them our attention and energy, they literally wont exist. See no, hear no, speak no.

Very interested to hear others views on this on here. Especially David Icke. There does seem to be a momentum at the moment re anti-conspiracies. But also that must be a sign they are starting to impact the mainstream and its thinking and have a widespread effect, which I think is a very good thing!
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Old 14-01-2016, 07:56 PM   #20
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It's a decent article, but it's told from a perspective that it's mostly just people's imagination running away with them and that believers must somehow be helped. Like it's a desease or something and that we need to be cured.

The best cure is proving us wrong of course, so just stop stealing our money to give it to your criminal friends on wall street, stop taking our freedoms away, stop bombing the middle east, stop raping our children, stop vaccinating and feeding us with poison and give us full disclosure on the UFO/ET stuff. We'll be cured in no time. But until you do all that and more we're not going anywhere.
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