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Old 03-04-2013, 03:28 AM   #1
hunkahunka
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Default "Bacon! Bacon!"

I have a sad little story to tell today, about bacon.

A woman that I know works part time sometimes to help
out a woman who lives at a combination nursing home/seniors
residence. Many of the patients there have Parkinsons and Alzheimers
among the usual conditions afflicting the elderly.
The woman who she helps has alzheimers disease. She needs help
with cleaning her room and sometimes will not eat unless someone
helps her. She has no teeth and refuses to wear false teeth. She is 92 years old and almost completely silent all day.
This morning my friend came over for breakfast, and she busied me with helping her to place some calls. Because of that I was late in getting our
breakfast ready for us. I made a delicious breakfast for us. I had some
additive-free , nitrate free bacon, and fried up some on very low heat.
It came out perfect and left a big puddle of bacon fat in the pan.
Next I sauteed some mushrooms and sweet frozen corn kernels
and added some good quality high omega eggs, scrambling them in the bacon fat with the mushrooms and the fresh corn niblets.
We were running late and she had to leave for work , but it smelled so good that I was able to convince her to take her half with her to work. She was due to eat breakfast with the 92 year old lady and feed her breakfast.
She said she planned to give some of it to the elderly woman.
She came over this evening and I asked her if she had given the food to the woman. She told me that she had given the woman some bacon , which was still soft, as I had cooked it on low heat. She tells me that the seniors there are kept on a strictly low fat diet , essentially low fat mush, because many of them have difficulty chewing properly or properly digesting their food. When she gave the toothless woman the soft bacon and some of the egg mixture, the woman became very eager to eat. The woman is a chinese senior who has lived a life of austerity and poverty all her life. For the past twenty years she has been eating rice and vegetables and nursing home mush. When she was given the rich, oily food, she began eating quickly. She looked questioningly at the bacon, quite curious about it. My friend is sure that it is the first time she had ever had bacon or even anything like bacon. My friend, who is also Chinese, pointed to it and said "bacon", before inserting another piece of it into her mouth.
After breakfast was finished, my friend helped to return to her room via her wheel chair. As she was being wheeled out of the dining room, she looked at a staffer and began yelling "bacon!" "bacon!" This was the loudest my friend had ever heard her be. She was usually silent, verging on catatonic.

When she told me this story, I told her the whole thing was sad, because the latest emerging nutritional consensus is that a lot of the reason behind the huge surge in incidence of Parkinsons and Alzheimers has been due to the obsessively low-cholesterol, 0% fat! diets which people have been eating for the past thirty years, in combination with all of the cholesterol lowering medications which the elderly are being coerced into taking. People who began cutting fat out of their diets thirty or forty years ago are now suffering the repurcussions of removing all animal fats from their diets. and getting strokes, Parkinsons and Alzhemers from the cholesterol lowering statin drugs which almost every one of them are on.

So here is this poor neglected woman with Alzheimers being fed low- fat mush, possibly or probably getting this immediate surge of strength from some bacon and eggs, and yelling "bacon! bacon!" because it was all she was capable of saying to explain her thoughts. Maybe she has a fully functioning mind which is only damaged in its motor nerve functions governing speech etc. , so after eating nitrate free, properly cooked, soft bacon, she has this epiphany that she really needs and craves animal fat to fight the progression of her disease. And all she is able to say is "bacon! bacon!"

I begged my friend to let me cook some bacon for her again next time.
She replied that she will have to ask permission from the witches at the
nursing home because she may get in trouble at work is she is caught
smuggling bacon in to a patient there. Unreal. I told her not to bother asking permission.
The staff there are GUARANTEED to delight in telling her how evil a thing it would be to give this woman bacon.
So sad. I told her to just go ahead and sneak it in once and awhile .
I hope she listens.

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Old 03-04-2013, 04:47 AM   #2
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Parkinsons is a progressive disorder of the central nervous system. Its caused by unexplained changes in nerve cells in the brain (basal ganglia) that degenerate, resulting in a reduced production of a cruial chemical that's involved in the trasmission of nerve impulses, the chemical is called dopamine.

Alzheimer's is a type of dementia that causes problems with memory, thinking and behavior. Symptoms usually develop slowly and get worse over time, becoming severe enough to interfere with daily tasks. Alzheimer's is the most common form of dementia, a general term for memory loss and other intellectual abilities serious enough to interfere with daily life. Alzheimer's disease accounts for 50 to 80 percent of dementia cases.

These incress the risk for both;

1) Mycotoxins (waste products) from microbes. Mycotoxins are highly acidic and interfere with brain signaling, causing "brain fog,"

2) Heavy metals (e.g. mercury and others),

3) Other metals (e.g. aluminum),

4) Strokes (whether known about or not),

5) Free radicals (i.e. oxidative stress),

6) Illegal drugs,

7) Prescription drugs,

8) Lack of oxygen. As the body gets older, less oxygen is absorbed, though in many cases the problem is not a lack of oxygen, but rather microbe mycotoxins (see #1),

9) Diet, which is high in bad fats (e.g. trans-fatty acids) and low in good fats (e.g. omega-3). This includes taking certain kinds of fats (e.g. saturated fats) frequently. such as eating peanut butter regularly,

10) Aspartame, Monosodium Glutamate, HVP, cysteine and other "excitotoxins" (which kill brain cells)
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Old 03-04-2013, 12:13 PM   #3
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http://www.coconutketones.com/

http://www.coconutresearchcenter.org...%20Ketones.htm
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Old 03-04-2013, 12:16 PM   #4
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Praise the Lard

After decades on the culinary blacklist, lard needs a PR make-over. Here goes: it’s good for you and it tastes great. What’s not to love?


By Sasha Chapman



Porky's revenge: once the most popular
cooking fat in North America, rendered pork
fat is making a comeback


Childhood sweets almost always taste better in memory: the chocolate and vanilla crème cookies peddled by our neighbourhood Girl Guides can’t compare to the ones we once consumed by the box as kids. Even Oreos don’t taste like they used to. In my house, there’s a stark exception to the nostalgia rule: my mother’s fragile oatmeal cookies, which are crisp and crumbly and nothing like the ubiquitous stodgy, chewy disks sold at grocery stores and coffee shops across the country.

I never questioned why her cookies were so much better. Then one day I asked for the recipe.

“All right,” she said. “But first you’ll need to buy some lard.” My mother, who doesn’t drink, smoke or even indulge in caffeine, is not the sort of person to use four-letter words. I was shocked. Among food taboos, lard is right up there with pigtails and trotters: not only is it derived from the pig—itself forbidden in many diets—but it is pure, snow white animal fat, a.k.a. the stuff that kills you. Or so I believed for most of my adult life.

Fat provokes more discussion (hysterical or otherwise) than any other food. Every week, there seems to be a new study about its dangers, while industry rolls out another new and improved (which usually means chemically rearranged) vegetable oil to replace the animal fats that were once a staple of our diet. As Vogue food columnist Jeffrey Steingarten wrote, you could be forgiven for concluding that eating is the leading cause of death.

It’s hard to believe that lard was once the fat of choice in North America, more common than either butter or margarine. For the better part of our culinary history, it defined Canadian cooking (just look at a cookbook by Madame Benoît or Edna Staebler) in the same way that olive oil defines Italian cuisine or butter carries the flavours of Normandy. Cooking with pork fat also made good sense: it was cheap and plentiful because the breeds we raised had a thick coat of the stuff under their skin. Nothing is better for deep-frying (with the possible exception of beef tallow), and it’s more neutral tasting than a bubbling vat of vegetable oil. Its large crystals also make it ideal for shortening a tender pastry crust.

When Procter & Gamble introduced Crisco in 1911, they promoted it as “the absolutely new product for frying, for shortening, for cake making.” Lard—which most housewives had to render themselves—was meant to seem as dreadfully old-fashioned as Grandma’s doilies. First created as a cheaper ingredient for candles, the hydrogenated vegetable shortening didn’t catch on right away. Crisco didn’t get its big break until after the Second World War, when the “lipid hypothesis”—the theory that saturated fats from animal products contributed to blood cholesterol and increased our risk of heart disease—began to take hold. In 1961, the American Heart Association started advocating a “prudent diet,” one that was low in cholesterol and saturated fats. That same year, physiologist Ancel Keys, widely considered the father of the lipid hypothesis, made the cover of Time magazine. Animal fats were on their way out of the kitchen.

Despite the complexity of the subject and a lack of conclusive research, we bought the recommendations of nutritionists and doctors schooled in Keys’s theories. Cheap, processed margarine and vegetable shortening, chock full of unsaturated fats, were promoted as healthy alternatives. So we dutifully cut back on lard, duck fat and beef tallow—not to mention butter—and made the switch to hydrogenated oils. The benefits seemed obvious: these new and improved fats would be better for our hearts and easier on our wallets. Convenience was another factor, for both the food manufacturers and us: who has time to render their own lard these days? And hey, if our cookies had an indefinite shelf life, so much the better.

For a long time, there seemed to be only one downside to Crisco and Becel and the mint-chocolate Girl Guide cookies loaded with hydrogenated palm kernel oil and vegetable oil shortening: taste. Cookies made with processed vegetable fats aren’t satisfying. Instead of coating your tongue like a butter-shortened chocolate chip cookie or my mother’s lard-shortened oatmeal cookies, they evaporate into nothingness. And perhaps because the sensation is so fleeting, they leave you wanting more. Repeatedly, we fell prey to what industry insiders call the Snackwell syndrome: the tendency to overindulge in something that trumpets itself as healthy or diet-friendly. Which may explain why, in those post-war years of abhorring fat, we began to eat more of it: we now get more of our daily calories from fat than we did 100 years ago.



Praise the Lard - Page 2

It turns out we were woefully misinformed. The cure was worse than the disease: lard, along with other traditional fats, isn’t nearly as bad as we thought. And those scientifically engineered vegetable oils that we’ve been consuming in ever greater quantities? They’re worse: two Girl Guide cookies are burdened with a quarter of our recommended daily saturated fat intake. They also contain trans fats, a by-product of the hydrogenation process and public enemy number one in the war against lipids.

Hydrogenation, the process of adding hydrogen atoms to unsaturated oil, makes vegetable shortening shelf stable and solid at room temperature, but it also turns good fats into bad: although hydrogenated vege­table shortening doesn’t look like a saturated fat under a microscope, it acts like one, raising bad LDL cholesterol levels in the blood. Even worse, it can lower HDL levels, the good cholesterol.

The backlash against trans fats has sent big food companies rushing into the arms of non-hydrogenated palm oil, which is full of saturated fats and represents a host of ills for the environment, such as the destruction of rain forests and the energy spent exporting it to us.

Alejandro Marangoni, a food scientist at the University of Guelph who has built a career out of exploring new ways to solidify and restructure vegetable oil, says the industry has known about the trouble with trans fats for almost two decades. “Lard is certainly better for you than hydrogenated vegetable oil,” he says. “We would have been much better off if we’d stuck to eating animal fats.” Tellingly, even as he waits for industry to green-light his newest vegetable oil emulsion, the scientist still bakes with butter at home.

Butter was the first animal fat to be returned to its rightful place in our diet. Over the past year or so, artisanal butters have become the new it ingredient. Every self-respecting chef churns his own, and serious shops like Scheffler’s and Cheese Boutique stock several choices. It doesn’t come cheap: Ste. Mère’s Beurre d’Isigny from Normandy costs $19 for half a pound.

Lard is now following butter’s lead. A few years ago, there were only two options: you could buy Tenderflake (then hydrogenated for stabilizing) at the grocery store or else you had to render your own lard at home. Shops like the Healthy Butcher are regularly stocking tubs of rendered lard, and customers can order it from Cumbrae’s. It’s also finding savoury uses in Toronto kitchens—from Mexican restaurants like Milagro to Cowbell, which serves it instead of butter on charcuterie plates. Pastry chefs have always known that it makes an exceptionally flaky crust; you can eat lard-shortened crusts at the AGO’s new Frank and at Jamie Kennedy’s kitchens. Just don’t expect to read about it on the menu.

Even among chefs who blithely serve us pickled beef tongue, lard is the ingredient that knows no name: when Mario Batali first started to cure pork fatback with herbs and spices before serving it in thin slices, he instructed his waiters to call it “prosciutto bianco.” It’s called lardo in Italy, but health-conscious New Yorkers would never have ordered that. In Jennifer McLagan’s excellent new book, Fat: An Appreciation of a Misunderstood Ingredient, With Recipes, she recalls a “white butter” (rosemary-flavoured pork fat) that she once ate at a Toronto restaurant. Before she gives out the recipe, she offers a little advice: “Make your guests taste it before you tell them what it is.”

But why are we still so leery of lard? It contains nearly a quarter less saturated fat than butter, and more than double the mono- and four times the polyunsaturated fats. (In simple terms, the good fats.) And if you get your lard from a free-range pig, it will also be higher in omega-3s, another good thing.

“We’re scared of it because we’re so disconnected from our food,” says McLagan. “In the past, most of our food culture came from our parents.”

We didn’t just give up good-tasting fats when we switched from lard to vegetable shortening; we sold culinary traditions that had been passed down from generation to generation. For years, chemically altered food was seen as progress, and scientists, industry and consumers jumped on the unsaturated bandwagon. We all forgot that universal parental admonition: don’t play with your food.

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Old 03-04-2013, 12:33 PM   #5
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I think it will have been the salt. The fat may well have brain protective properties, but has to be digested etc to have any use, which is a slow process. Salt can be absorbed through the mouth and has effects on the nervous system, hence a speedy effect

Great story
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Old 03-04-2013, 12:43 PM   #6
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I think it will have been the salt. The fat may well have brain protective properties, but has to be digested etc to have any use, which is a slow process. Salt can be absorbed through the mouth and has effects on the nervous system, hence a speedy effect

Great story
Possibly both, the "taste" of fat has to have some effect, even before digestion.
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Old 03-04-2013, 01:27 PM   #7
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Possibly both, the "taste" of fat has to have some effect, even before digestion.
Yeah maybe, but Im not sure if it hits the nervous system quite like salt does..Msg would be the crack of salt.. Soon as it hits your lips you want more! the fat would be more use as a strucural component of the brain for repair etc. Either way... Bacon for dementia!!!
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Old 01-05-2013, 09:51 PM   #8
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Just an update to this story (one month later)

My friend only cares for this lady at breakfast time one day per week,
and since the "bacon! bacon!" incident she bought a couple of packages
of bacon so that she can cook a little bit and bring her some each day.
The second time that she brought the woman bacon, the woman began
speaking in some chinese dialect which my friend did not understand,
but she said the dialect was intermixed with the word bacon, and almost
sounded like sing-song. She was so happy to be having bacon again, it sounded to my friend like a little song about bacon. It just occurred to me
that she may have actually remembered the word bacon from the first time
she had learned the word the previous week, which could have been part
of her happiness, the fact that she'd actually remembered a new word. She's in her nineties with Alzheimers, after all, and bacon is a foreign word which she'd heard and used only once. Nontheless she had remembered the word 'bacon' over the entire week and was using it again in response to tasting bacon again. Have to wonder if the fat in the food helped create that one synapse required to learn the word or something. Yesterday my friend brought her sausages, and the woman now refuses to eat any of the hospital breakfast on the mornings that my friend brings her bacon or sausage. She cannot see well , and when my friend tries to sneak some of the unsalted hospital mush into her mouth , she spits it out. The lady started softly crying because she was so touched by my friends concern for her and her bringing the special food to her.

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Old 02-05-2013, 04:20 PM   #9
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I'm not sure about the feeding grains to pigs (bottom of infographic) part, but, it seems to be beneficial in this case.

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Old 02-05-2013, 08:04 PM   #10
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As we get older, our digestive system declines and therefore old people suffers from vitamin B12 deficiency. Sounds like people aren't getting meat and good nutrients they need at the nursing home. Feeling like zombie isn't a nice place to be

There is a suggestion that there is a link between vit B12 deficiency and AD.
http://archneur.ama-assn.org/cgi/reprint/55/11/1449.pdf
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Old 02-05-2013, 09:45 PM   #11
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Great posts.

Fats are so important to our diet.
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Old 03-05-2013, 04:45 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by elshaper View Post
As we get older, our digestive system declines and therefore old people suffers from vitamin B12 deficiency. Sounds like people aren't getting meat and good nutrients they need at the nursing home. Feeling like zombie isn't a nice place to be

There is a suggestion that there is a link between vit B12 deficiency and AD.
http://archneur.ama-assn.org/cgi/reprint/55/11/1449.pdf
They probably get a lot of canned food also, which isn't as high in nutrients as what we all need.

.
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Old 14-08-2013, 12:53 PM   #13
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This just seems to fit in this thread,

I found this incredible Chinese movie about a Chinese nursing home/

It is both inspiration and comedy in one film:
(English subtitles)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UZ6cmMc3XRc

A performance group of Chinese seniors must escape from a guarded nursing home to perform at a talent contest in Tianjin city.

老年人,疗养院,电影,Full Circle,movie,chinese,普通话,字幕,张杨,许还山

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Old 14-08-2013, 10:37 PM   #14
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The lady started softly crying because she was so touched by my friends concern for her and her bringing the special food to her.
Sad but beautiful story. This sort of thing really upsets me though. Why are so many people just shoved into old peoples homes and treated like inconveniences?
No need to answer that, I know the agenda only too well

I'm sure where the elderly lady came from, when she was young, people would have respected and looked after their elderly relatives regardless of what was wrong with them, instead of sticking them somewhere/anywhere else to be 'cared' for by complete strangers.

Your friend is an angel. I'm glad common sense took over and she started to give the old lady what she wanted and not fear the consequences of the (no doubt low empathy) staff finding out. Strike one for humanity against the control system
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Old 03-09-2013, 10:14 PM   #15
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Sad but beautiful story. This sort of thing really upsets me though. Why are so many people just shoved into old peoples homes and treated like inconveniences?
No need to answer that, I know the agenda only too well

I'm sure where the elderly lady came from, when she was young, people would have respected and looked after their elderly relatives regardless of what was wrong with them, instead of sticking them somewhere/anywhere else to be 'cared' for by complete strangers.

Your friend is an angel. I'm glad common sense took over and she started to give the old lady what she wanted and not fear the consequences of the (no doubt low empathy) staff finding out. Strike one for humanity against the control system
the sad thing is that in the past two years I've watched two of my elderly
friends ignore my advice and die. In one case, a woman in her seventies
was getting overloaded on pharmaceutical pills and then injected with toxic chemo, all of which I advised her against. She believed me intitially and handed me $500 cash to order her some of the supplements that I suggested would help her. A friend of hers talked her out of it, she demanded her money back, and died a year later. Another friend threw all his vitamins in the garbage , refused to drink clean water, refused to stop smoking , kept eating sugar and sugary 'protein drink' supplement Ensure, kept taking his toxic antipsychotic pills instead of detoxing from whatever was making him crazy, and was dead two years later. Another elderly woman I know, I found out she was being talked into having her uterus and ovaries cut out on the basis of some vague test results. She was vital and doing Tai Chi every morning, leading the entire group. In other words she was in great health. She said the only way they could be sure if she had cancer or not was to go ahead and remove everything. I advised her against it and told her they were cutting women up at the drop of a hat to make money on surgery.
She agreed that she might reconsider it.
I saw her a year later, she told me she'd had the surgery anyway and was bitter that they'd gutted her and told her that the whole thing had been unnecessary after all but that she had foolproofed against it happening later.
She is weaker now and no longer doing Tai Chi.

This is the kind of thing which drives me nuts , having to know what I know and just not being able to get it through people's thick heads that the system if frigging dangerous to their healths.

any please watch this movie , its uplifting

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wEbfCj_yPvc

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Old 04-09-2013, 01:57 AM   #16
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the sad thing is that in the past two years I've watched two of my elderly
friends ignore my advice and die. In one case, a woman in her seventies
was getting overloaded on pharmaceutical pills and then injected with toxic chemo, all of which I advised her against. She believed me intitially and handed me $500 cash to order her some of the supplements that I suggested would help her. A friend of hers talked her out of it, she demanded her money back, and died a year later. Another friend threw all his vitamins in the garbage , refused to drink clean water, refused to stop smoking , kept eating sugar and sugary 'protein drink' supplement Ensure, kept taking his toxic antipsychotic pills instead of detoxing from whatever was making him crazy, and was dead two years later. Another elderly woman I know, I found out she was being talked into having her uterus and ovaries cut out on the basis of some vague test results. She was vital and doing Tai Chi every morning, leading the entire group. In other words she was in great health. She said the only way they could be sure if she had cancer or not was to go ahead and remove everything. I advised her against it and told her they were cutting women up at the drop of a hat to make money on surgery.
She agreed that she might reconsider it.
I saw her a year later, she told me she'd had the surgery anyway and was bitter that they'd gutted her and told her that the whole thing had been unnecessary after all but that she had foolproofed against it happening later.
She is weaker now and no longer doing Tai Chi.

This is the kind of thing which drives me nuts , having to know what I know and just not being able to get it through people's thick heads that the system if frigging dangerous to their healths.

any please watch this movie , its uplifting

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wEbfCj_yPvc
You can't make people do anything. They have to want to do it themselves. The father of one of my best friends had "incurable" brain cancer. I explained how it could be cured. My friend did nothing and his dad died.
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Old 04-09-2013, 06:24 PM   #17
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This is the kind of thing which drives me nuts , having to know what I know and just not being able to get it through people's thick heads that the system if frigging dangerous to their healths.
You're not the only one who is driven nuts by this. A friend that I used to have ended up having her bowels removed and now has a colostomy bag. She had 'irritable bowel syndrome' for years, which got progressively worse to the point that she couldn't sit down on anything without an internal burning sensation.
We had talked and talked at length about her eating habits, and she asked me to help her change the way she ate, I spent ages coming up with recipies and an eating plan that was easy to follow and affordable and healthy and that I believed would help the 'IBS' that her doctor told her she had.
I'm not a nutritionist but I did it because I could see how unhealthy she was living.
She asked for the plan, I didn't volunteer it, so....did she do it?
Sadly not.
There was every reason under the sun why she couldn't possibly change the way she ate, and it was just so much easier to carry on eating ready meals and fast food.
A year or two later she was crapping in plastic back strapped to her waist after the same doctor that told her she just had wind caused by 'IBS' told her she actually had bowel cancer.
I learnt a BIG but old lesson, you can lead a horse to water but you cant make it drink.
I don't give advice anymore. If people are interested in what I do and how I live my life, I'm happy to tell them, and if thats enough to give them a push to change their lives for their betterment then great, but its soul destroying to watch someone essentially driving full speed down a dead end road and not see the brick wall ahead of them.

I've just read that back, and would like to point out that I don't see myself as some kind of guru, or someone who's got all the answers, far from it, I'm just someone who's on their way to figuring out whats right and wrong for me in this world. If others take something from the way I live my life (which is very different from most people) then that makes me happy, but not big headed

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Old 13-01-2014, 04:07 PM   #18
hunkahunka
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Originally Posted by 5145pholus View Post
You're not the only one who is driven nuts by this. A friend that I used to have ended up having her bowels removed and now has a colostomy bag. She had 'irritable bowel syndrome' for years, which got progressively worse to the point that she couldn't sit down on anything without an internal burning sensation.
We had talked and talked at length about her eating habits, and she asked me to help her change the way she ate, I spent ages coming up with recipies and an eating plan that was easy to follow and affordable and healthy and that I believed would help the 'IBS' that her doctor told her she had.
I'm not a nutritionist but I did it because I could see how unhealthy she was living.
She asked for the plan, I didn't volunteer it, so....did she do it?
Sadly not.
There was every reason under the sun why she couldn't possibly change the way she ate, and it was just so much easier to carry on eating ready meals and fast food.
A year or two later she was crapping in plastic back strapped to her waist after the same doctor that told her she just had wind caused by 'IBS' told her she actually had bowel cancer.
I learnt a BIG but old lesson, you can lead a horse to water but you cant make it drink.
I don't give advice anymore. If people are interested in what I do and how I live my life, I'm happy to tell them, and if thats enough to give them a push to change their lives for their betterment then great, but its soul destroying to watch someone essentially driving full speed down a dead end road and not see the brick wall ahead of them.

I've just read that back, and would like to point out that I don't see myself as some kind of guru, or someone who's got all the answers, far from it, I'm just someone who's on their way to figuring out whats right and wrong for me in this world. If others take something from the way I live my life (which is very different from most people) then that makes me happy, but not big headed
I know two Chinese women approximately the same age, around 67 yrs. old.
One of them is a specialist in acupuncture and Chinese herbs and nutrition. She does not look a day over 50 years old, and a sexy fit fifty at that, firm breasts, with her hair thick and standing up from the front of her head like the hair of teenage athlete. You'd have to see this woman to believe it, and she's almost 70.
The other woman is the same age. Stuffs her face on white rice every day. Refuses to take even one vitamin, occasionally eats candy and chocolate. Has a great big spare tire around the middle, sagging breasts, infected tooth, snores like a bear every night, bladder problems, kidney pain etc.
If she drinks water before going out, she'll be running for a bathroom less than an hour later.


I have known her for years. When I first met her she was still somewhat open-minded and would try the occasional supplement or listen to advice.

To her credit, she refuses to take statin drugs or vaccines which the white-coats are pushing on her. She swears off all pills completely, the problem is that due to her cultural background she distrusts ALL pills and now refuses to even swallow a supplement pill of any kind. (many Chinese can or will make no differentiation between a pharmacy pill and a vitamin pill because Chinese medicine has long had a far more blurred line between the two. In fact in some regions of Asia there IS no pharma pill option. Its all herbs and herb pills and teas basically)

Put a bottle of vitamins in front of them, it's medicine. Pills are medicine. Vitamins are pills. Therefore vitamin pills are medicinal pills, and No amount of persuasion, emoting, hand wringing , or screaming blue murder will change that.

I told her to look at the health of the other woman, who is the same age as her, for proof that there could be something to alternative health , alternative diet, herbs, etc. She got angry that I would compare her to another person, insisting that the other woman's health advantage was basically due to better luck and better circumstances(ability to exercise/swim every day) , and good genetics etc.
In other words she'll grasp at any straw necessary to ignore any advice on nutrition. Meanwhile she keeps falling apart. She looks more miserable, depressed, and irritable by the month.

Last edited by hunkahunka; 13-01-2014 at 04:12 PM.
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Old 13-01-2014, 11:26 PM   #19
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My dad suffers from parkinsons disease, I think it's been 16 years since it was diagnosed ( he's 66 years old now). his speech is a tiny bit more slow than I remember from when I was younger, but beside's that his mind is pretty good for the moment. The bigger problem is with his limbs, when I was youner I remember he couldnt stop hi leg (right one I think) from shaking when he was sitting, now its both his legs and one of his arms. Thankfully he is not on a cocktail of drugs and only takes one pill a day called Sinemet plus http://www.medicines.org.uk/guides/s...00mg%20tablets, which is meant to increase the dopamine levels in the body, not that I trust any pharma drug's anyway.

He eat's well but is still quite slim, due to him being underweight before and enjoys a glass of whiskey/ brandy every now and again. He used to drink and smoke alot when he was younger and most probably did some weed, opium and stronger stuff I don't know about He's given up the fags for a few years now and drinks in moderation.

Anyone got any tips on any particular supplement/ foodstuffs he should include/ increase?
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Old 14-01-2014, 02:53 AM   #20
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Get him on a diet of good healthy fats including coconut oil, organic butter, and high quality high fat yogurt. Anyone with Parkinsons should not be drinking, in my opinion. I am not a doctor or even an armchair expert on Parkinsons , but I do know that alcohol spells bad news for the brain. It actually depresses brain activity even farther, and I shudder to think what it must do to the immune system/gut flora. It dehydrates the hell out of people, burns their livers, wears out the kidneys, drains the body of urea and vital nutrients......Alcohol in general is just bad news.

There's a real good reason that most little children vomit after their first taste of alcohol. Its not because small children are just too wimpy and sensitive etc. Children puke the stuff up intuitively and instantaneously because it is so obviously a toxic poison , that its sometimes hard to believe how far social conditioning will push us right past our most basic instincts. Fill up a jar with vodka and try to to get any cat to touch the crap, no matter WHAT you mix it with. Yet elderly sick individuals think the crap is health food.

Detoxify the hell out of him. EDTA suppositories are expensive, but they work incredibly well. Zeolite powder can be sneaked into his beverages, which also dramatically detoxifies the body. Magnesium salt baths at night. Keep him well-hydrated
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