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Old 20-11-2016, 02:30 PM   #1
the apprentice
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Default The Seed Bank

This is all about heirloom seed collecting and tested viability of the seeds for future use.

If we look at the seed vault at Svalgard, how long do the expect the seeds in their to remain viable. I have read that corn or wheat can easily last over thirty years, and others only a couple of seasons.

I have done my fair amount of collecting for about ten years, the last seven seriously, including many wild and cultivated herbs.

For my next serious project I'm build up stocks for a an Apocathery garden and have a few old rarities like Good King Henry, Teasle, Yarrow and many more, which I have been experimenting on myself for many years now armed with my trusted Culpeppers Complete Herbal.

Please can you tell me what and how you have been doing in this arena.
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Old 24-11-2016, 09:53 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the apprentice View Post
This is all about heirloom seed collecting and tested viability of the seeds for future use.

If we look at the seed vault at Svalgard, how long do the expect the seeds in their to remain viable. I have read that corn or wheat can easily last over thirty years, and others only a couple of seasons.

I have done my fair amount of collecting for about ten years, the last seven seriously, including many wild and cultivated herbs.

For my next serious project I'm build up stocks for a an Apocathery garden and have a few old rarities like Good King Henry, Teasle, Yarrow and many more, which I have been experimenting on myself for many years now armed with my trusted Culpeppers Complete Herbal.

Please can you tell me what and how you have been doing in this arena.
Hullo all. I highlighted that post above from the apprentice to bring in a few observations using my experiences here , listening and learning from these pages, and in the world out there that affects me real time.

It is with no disrespect that I don't agree with all that the post holds, as my writings here are my opinions and experiences and not that of the apprentice.

Firstly, remember that this thread is from the apprentice, and if asked, I will post elsewhere. And that you should not forget the original questions put forward by the apprentice.

Now. Its my view that one should NOT have a seed bank, in the same way as a preper or survivalist might wish to keep one. A true seed bank should be stored in a viable climate for each seed type, and that shit is expensive to do and run. What most folk do in these circumstances is to hold on to much more than is needed in the hope that, percentage wise, there will be a harvest after a set time. This is hope. I prefer to work with a more stable mindset!

The gardener or grower will keep seeds and nuts successfully in to the following few years to see their strain carry on into the next harvest (of seeds and crop). But relies on the ability to re-order or re-locate if a strain parishes.
Holding on to a good strain for more than a few years will drastically reduce potential.

But the grower will more than likely plant those seeds well before that to continue that strain into the next harvest.

Now with that out of the way, what could one do? What is the best way to preserve a strain or seed type that will almost guarantee, rather than hope-to, give a productive crop, year after year, season after season?

Start growing of course. You knew the answer.

The best type of preparation for the future is to work for it in the NOW! And by that I mean one makes their 'preps' active, rather than passive. In preping in the home this means using the mantra given to us, or certainly made popular, by Jack Spearco of The Survival Podcast, to "eat what you store and store what you eat"! This means that you dont buy in passive amounts that sit there and do nothing. One supplies themselves with things that they need in the now, therefore making sure that this extra investment is used rather than wasted if things dont go tits-up!

In seed storage terms this means one has to be growing their stores, keeping aside that which is needed to cover a few failed crops plus a few good and successful ones.

My take on the seed bank the apprentice, is to not have an extended one, to last a few years, having to re supply every so often, but to have a normal seed bank, of myriad types, that have their origins already in your grow yard. Start preping the beds this year. Start planting in the spring or this winter in propagation beds indoors. Start collecting pots that sit close in the 'home section' (area 1 in permaculture terminology) so that you have enough when you need to plant. Start bagging some free forest-floor muck to aid in creating a rich soil base. Grab some free compost from the tip if you find that its free (it is in Croydon, but not in S Wales).
All to use when you get going.

Just my two penneth.


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Old 24-11-2016, 09:56 PM   #3
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The gates and rockefellers did fund the svalbard seed bank you mention but there is also a seed bank under kew gardens in an underground bunker
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Old 25-11-2016, 01:41 PM   #4
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Yup. There is no doubt that the Svalbard global seed vault in Norway was bank rolled by the parasites that be. There are other seed storage areas in other countries too, I am sure, like the one at Kew. But the big one in Norway is protected by a small army.

Knowing that what they are doing to the environment is detrimental, they sort to protect the diversity of the world. The same goes for all fauna, I'm sure!
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Old 26-11-2016, 05:00 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the apprentice View Post
This is all about heirloom seed collecting and tested viability of the seeds for future use.

If we look at the seed vault at Svalgard, how long do the expect the seeds in their to remain viable. I have read that corn or wheat can easily last over thirty years, and others only a couple of seasons.

I have done my fair amount of collecting for about ten years, the last seven seriously, including many wild and cultivated herbs.

For my next serious project I'm build up stocks for a an Apocathery garden and have a few old rarities like Good King Henry, Teasle, Yarrow and many more, which I have been experimenting on myself for many years now armed with my trusted Culpeppers Complete Herbal.

Please can you tell me what and how you have been doing in this arena.
I would love to hear more of your apocathery garden.

I know, or have heard of one such garden. The owner had planted the medicine plants in a spiral, and in order that they might be needed in life!

For example on the outer area were the things that a pregnant mother or the child would need. As the child grew, then so the medicine changes to suit the things required in life, and into the future of the child. All those ills that one might meet along the way....teething cream, nappy rash...older now....tooth paste, spot cream, newly menstruating, etc!

And then tighter to the center of the spiral were things to make one fit again, herbs, potion ingredients etc etc.

at the center are things related to a dying body.


What you gonna do with yours?
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Old 28-11-2016, 04:41 AM   #6
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Found this as I was looking for a seed company last night.

www.realseads.co.uk

Intresting information on the whole process of seed saving too!
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Old 29-11-2016, 12:09 AM   #7
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People used to store seed in amphora shaped vessels made of clay the hypothesis being in some circles that it makes the seed last longer. Don't think anyone has done any studies on this though.

I share Tom's attitude that to store it you have to grow it. If it too much hassle or I am too stupid to grow it properly after a few failed attempts I usually give up and move on to something else.

I have also noticed self seeded stuff grows really well. Lots of beetroot this season and I didnt plant any of it
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Old 29-11-2016, 03:01 AM   #8
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I agree with tom and practice, practice, practice until you go blue.

No good having 50 kinds of seeds that you are keeping for that crisis and don't know how to do it. It can be very hit and miss, even for an experienced gardener who moves from one region to another. It happened to me and it can take years of experimenting with soil builders and fertilisers, battling with weeds and insect pests, to get a healthy plot going.

Start now before you need it and harvest your seeds from what you produce, that way you know that soil can produce if given the right care even if they are not heirloom varieties, desperate people don't care about what variety of tomato is fruiting.
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Old 10-12-2017, 04:04 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by tom bombadil View Post
Yup. There is no doubt that the Svalbard global seed vault in Norway was bank rolled by the parasites that be. There are other seed storage areas in other countries too, I am sure, like the one at Kew. But the big one in Norway is protected by a small army.

Knowing that what they are doing to the environment is detrimental, they sort to protect the diversity of the world. The same goes for all fauna, I'm sure!
It's an Organic Seed Vault in Norway.
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Old 10-12-2017, 04:07 PM   #10
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There is also www.realseeds.co.uk
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