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Old 29-07-2011, 10:39 PM   #1
al209
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Default "Essential" Fatty Acids & Degeneration

from www.raypeat.com. Article and references here. The references are almost as long as the article.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Peat
50 years ago, in the first phase of marketing the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), linoleic acid was “heart protective,” and the saturated fats raised cholesterol and caused heart disease.

In the second phase, the other “essential fatty acid,” linolenic acid, was said to be even better than linoleic acid.

In the third phase, the longer chain omega -3 (omega minus three, or n minus three) fatty acids, DHA and EPA, are said to be even better than linolenic acid.

Along the way, the highly unsaturated arachidonic acid, which we and other animals make out of the linoleic acid in foods, was coming to be identified with the “harmful animal fats.” But we just didn't hear much about how the amount of arachidonic acid in the tissues depended on the amount of linoleic acid in the diet.

U.S. marketing dominates the world economy, including of course the communication media, so we shouldn't expect to hear much about the role of PUFA in causing cancer, diabetes, obesity, aging, thrombosis, arthritis and immunodeficiency, or to hear about the benefits of the saturated fats.

The saturated fats include the “tropical fats,” because they are synthesized in very warm organisms, and are very stable at those temperatures. Their stability offers some protection against the unstable PUFA.

Several of the degenerative conditions produced by the “essential fatty acids” can be reversed by use of saturated fats, varying in length from the short chains of coconut oil to the very long chains of waxes
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When a person uses a drug, there is generally an awareness that the benefit has to be weighed against the side effects. But if something is treated as a “nutrient,” especially an “essential nutrient,” there is an implication that it won't produce undesirable side effects.

Over the last thirty years I have asked several prominent oil researchers what the evidence is that there is such a thing as an “essential fatty acid.” One professor cited a single publication about a solitary sick person who recovered from some sickness after being given some unsaturated fat. (If he had known of any better evidence, wouldn't he have mentioned it?) The others (if they answered at all) cited “Burr and Burr, 1929.” The surprising thing about that answer is that these people can consider any nutritional research from 1929 to be definitive. It's very much like quoting a 1929 opinion of a physicist regarding the procedure for making a hydrogen bomb. What was known about nutrition in 1929? Most of the B vitamins weren't even suspected, and it had been only two or three years since “vitamin B” had been subdivided into two factors, the “antineuritic factor,” B1, and the “growth factor,” B2. Burr had no way of really understanding what deficiencies or toxicities were present in his experimental diet.

A few years after the first experiments, Burr put one of his “essential fatty acid deficient” rats under a bell jar to measure its metabolic rate, and found that the deficient animals were metabolizing 50% faster than rats that were given linoleic and linolenic acids as part of their diet. That was an important observation, but Burr didn't understand its implications. Later, many experiments showed that the polyunsaturated fats slowed metabolism by profoundly interfering with the function of the thyroid hormone and the cellular respiratory apparatus. Without the toxic fats, respiratory energy metabolism was very intense, and a diet that was nutritionally sufficient for a sluggish animal wouldn't necessarily be adequate for the vigorous animals.

Several publications between 1936 and 1944 made it very clear that Burr's basic animal diet was deficient in various nutrients, especially vitamin B6. The disease that appeared in Burr's animals could be cured by fat free B-vitamin preparations, or by purified vitamin B6 when it became available. A zinc deficiency produces similar symptoms, and at the time Burr did his experiments, there was no information on the effects of fats on mineral absorption. If a diet is barely adequate in the essential minerals, increasing the metabolic rate, or decreasing intestinal absorption of minerals, will produce mineral deficiencies and metabolic problems.

Although “Burr's disease” clearly turned out to be a B-vitamin deficiency, probably combined with a mineral deficiency, it continues to be cited as the basis justifying the multibillion dollar industry that has grown up around the “essential” oils.

Two years before Burr's experiment, German researchers found that a fat-free diet prevented almost all spontaneous cancers in rats. Later work showed that the polyunsaturated fats both initiate and promote cancer. With that knowledge, the people who kept claiming that “linoleic, linolenic, and maybe arachidonic acid are the essential fatty acids,” should have devoted some effort to finding out how much of that “essential nutrient” was enough, so that people could minimize their consumption of the carcinogenic stuff.

Between the first and second world wars, cod liver oil was recommended as a vitamin supplement, at first as a source of vitamin A, and later as a source of vitamins A and D. But in the late 1940s, experimenters used it as the main fat in dogs' diet, and found that they all died from cancer, while the dogs on a standard diet had only a 5% cancer mortality. That sort of information, and the availability of synthetic vitamins, led to the decreased use of cod liver oil.

But around that time, the seed oil industry was in crisis because the use of those oils in paints and plastics was being displaced by new compounds made from petroleum. The industry needed new markets, and discovered ways to convince the public that seed oils were better than animal fats. They were called the “heart protective oils,” though human studies soon showed the same results that the animal studies had, namely, that they were toxic to the heart and increased the incidence of cancer.

The “lipid hypothesis” of heart disease argued that cholesterol in the blood caused atherosclerosis, and that the polyunsaturated oils lowered the amount of cholesterol in the blood. Leaving behind the concept of nutritional essentiality, this allowed the industry (and their academic supporters, such as Frederick Stare at Harvard) to begin promoting the oils as having drug-like therapeutic properties. Larger amounts of polyunsaturated fat were supposed to be more protective by lowering the cholesterol, and were to be substituted for the saturated fats, which supposedly raised cholesterol and increased heart disease, producing atherosclerotic plaques in the blood vessels and increasing the formation of blood clots.

Since all ordinary foods contain significant amounts of the polyunsaturated fats, there was no reason to think that, even if they were essential nutrients, people were likely to become deficient in them. So the idea of treating the seed oils as drug-like substances, to be taken in large amounts, appealed to the food oil industry.

Prostaglandins, which are produced in the body by oxidizing the polyunsaturated fatty acids, provided an opportunity for the drug industry to get involved in a new market, and the prostaglandins offered a new way of arguing for the nutritional essentiality of linoleic and related acids: A whole system of “hormones” is made from these molecules. Since some of the prostaglandins suppress immunity, cause inflammation and promote cancer growth, some people have divided them into the “good prostaglandins” and the “bad prostaglandins.”

PGI2, or prostacyclin, is considered to be a good prostaglandin, because it causes vasodilatation, and so drug companies have made their own synthetic equivalents: Epoprostenol, iloprost, taprostene, ciprostene, UT-15, beraprost, and cicaprost. Some of these are being investigated for possible use in killing cancer.

But many very useful drugs that already existed, including cortisol and aspirin, were found to achieve some of their most important effects by inhibiting the formation of the prostaglandins. It was the body's load of polyunsaturated fats which made it very susceptible to inflammation, stress, trauma, infection, radiation, hormone imbalance, and other fundamental problems, and drugs like aspirin and cortisone, which limit the activation of the stored “essential fatty acids,” gain their remarkable range of beneficial effects partly by the restraint they impose on those stored toxins.

Increasingly, the liberation of arachidonic acid from tissues during stress is seen as a central factor in all forms of stress, either acute (as in burns or exercise) or chronic (as in diabetes or aging). And, as the fat stores become more toxic, it seems that they more readily liberate the free fatty acids. (For example, see Iritani, et al., 1984)

During this same period, a few experimenters were finding that animals which were fed a diet lacking the “essential” fatty acids had some remarkable properties: They consumed oxygen and calories at a very high rate, their mitochondria were unusually tough and stable, their tissues could be transplanted into other animals without provoking immunological rejection, and they were very hard to kill by trauma and a wide variety of toxins that easily provoke lethal shock in animals on the usual diet. As the Germans had seen in 1927, they had a low susceptibility to cancer, and new studies were showing that they weren't susceptible to various fibrotic conditions, including alcoholic liver cirrhosis.

In 1967 a major nutrition publication, Present Knowledge in Nutrition, published Hartroft and Porta's observation that the “age pigment,” lipofuscin, was formed in proportion to the amount of polyunsaturated fat and oxidants in the diet. The new interest in organ transplantation led to the discovery that the polyunsaturated fats prolonged graft survival, by suppressing the immune system. Immunosuppression was considered to have a role in the carcinogenicity of the “essential” fatty acids.

Around the same time, there were studies that showed that unsaturated fats retarded brain development and produced obesity.

Substances very much like the prostaglandins, called isoprostanes and neuroprostanes, are formed spontaneously from highly unsaturated fatty acids, and are useful as indicators of the rate of lipid peroxidation in the body. Most of the products of lipid peroxidation are toxic, as a result of their reactions with proteins, DNA, and the mitochondria. The age-related glycation products that are usually blamed on sugar, are largely the result of peroxidation of the polyunsaturated fatty acids.

Through the 1970s, this sort of information about the harmful effects of the PUFA was being slowly assimilated by the culture, though many dietitians still spoke of “the essential fatty acids, vitamin F.” By 1980, it looked as though responsible researchers would see the promotion of cancer, heart disease, mitochondrial damage, hypothyroidism and immunosuppression caused by the polyunsaturated fats as their most important feature, and would see that there had never been a basis for believing that they were essential nutrients.

But then, without acknowledging that there had been a problem with the doctrine of essentiality, fat researchers just started changing the subject, shifting the public discourse to safer, more profitable topics. The fats that had been called essential, but that had so many toxic effects, were no longer emphasized, and the failed idea of “essentiality” was shifted to different categories of polyunsaturated fats.

The addition of the long chain highly unsaturated fats to baby food formulas was recently approved, on the basis of their supposed “essentiality for brain development.” One of the newer arguments for the essentiality of the PUFA is that “they are needed for making cell membranes.” But human cells can grow and divide in artificial culture solutions which contain none of the polyunsaturated fats, and no one has claimed that they are growing “without membranes.”

The long chain fats found in fish and some algae don't interfere with animal enzymes as strongly as the seed oils do, and so by comparison, they aren't so harmful. They are also so unstable that relatively little of them is stored in the tissues. (And when they are used as food additives, it's necessary to use antioxidants to keep them from becoming smelly and acutely toxic.)

When meat is grilled at a high temperature, the normally spaced double bonds in PUFA migrate towards each other, becoming more stable, so that linoleic acid is turned into “conjugated linoleic acid.” This analog of the “essential” linoleic acid competes against the linoleic acid in tissues, and protects against cancer, atherosclerosis, inflammation and other effects of the normal PUFA. Presumably, anything which interferes with the essential fatty acids is protective, when the organism contains dangerous amounts of PUFA. Even the trans-isomers of the unsaturated fatty acids (found in butterfat, and convertible into conjugated linoleic acid) can be protective against cancer.

In the 1980s the oil promoters were becoming more sophisticated, and were publishing many experiments in which the fish oils were compared with corn oil, or safflower, or soy oil, and in many of those experiments, the animals' health was better when they didn't eat the very toxic seed oils, that contained the “essential fatty acids,” linoleic and linoleic acids.

Besides comparing the fish oils to the stronger toxins, another trick is to take advantage of the same immunosuppressive property that had seemed troublesome, and to emphasize their ability to temporarily alleviate some autoimmune or allergic diseases. X-rays were once used that way, to treat arthritis and ringworm, for example.

And, knowing that cancer cells have the ability to consume large amounts of fatty acids, they would test these fats in tissue culture dishes, and demonstrate that they were poisonous, cytotoxic, to the fast growing cancer cells. Although they caused cancer in animals, if they could be shown to kill cancer cells in a dish, they could be sold as anticancer drugs/nutrients, with the special mystique of being “essential fatty acids.” Strangely, their ability to kill cancer cells under some circumstances and to suppress some immunological reactions is being promoted in close association with the doctrine that these fats are nutritionally essential.

Arachidonic acid is made from linoleic acid, and so those two oils were considered as roughly equivalent in their ability to meet our nutritional needs, but a large part of current research is devoted to showing the details of how fish oils protect against arachidonic acid. The “balance” between the omega -3 and the omega -6 fatty acids is increasingly being presented as a defense against the toxic omega -6 fats. But the accumulation of unsaturated fats with aging makes any defense increasingly difficult, and the extreme instability of the highly unsaturated omega -3 fats creates additional problems.

PUFA and x-rays have many biological effects in common. They are immunosuppressive, but they produce their own inflammatory reactions, starting with increased permeability of capillaries, disturbed coagulation and proteolysis, and producing fibrosis and tumefaction or tissue atrophy. This isn't just a coincidence, since ionizing radiation attacks the highly unstable polyunsaturated molecules, simply accelerating processes that ordinarily happen more slowly as a result of stress and aging.

Prolonged stress eventually tends to be a self-sustaining process, impairing the efficient respiratory production of energy, converting muscle tissue to amino acids, suppressing the thyroid, and activating further mobilization of fatty acids. Fatty acids are mobilized from within the structure of cells by phospholipases, and from fat tissues by other lipases.

The highly unsaturated fatty acids, as well as the ordinary “essential fatty acids,” act directly to increase capillary permeability, even without conversion into prostaglandins, and they interfere in many ways with the clotting and clot removal systems. The effects of PUFA taken in a meal probably disturb the clotting system more than the same quantity of saturated fat, contrary to many of the older publications. The PUFA are widely believed to prevent clotting, but when cod liver oil is given to “EFA deficient” animals, it activates the formation of clots (Hornstra, et al., 1989). An opposite effect is seen when a long chain fatty acid synergizes with aspirin, to restrain clotting (Molina, et al., 2003).

Fibrosis is a generalized consequence of the abnormal capillary permeability produced by things that disrupt the clotting system. Estrogen, with its known contribution to the formation of blood clots and edema and fibrosis and tumors, achieves part of its effect by maintaining a chronically high level of free fatty acids, preferentially liberating arachidonic acid, rather than saturated fatty acids.

Butter, beef fat, and lamb fat are the only mostly saturated fats produced on a large scale in the U.S., and the cheapness/profitability of the seed oils made it easy to displace them. But, in the face of the immense amount of propagandistic “health” claims that have been made against the saturated fats, it's instructive to look at some of their actual effects, especially on the clotting system, and the related fibrotic reactions.

The saturated fatty acids are very unreactive chemically. Coconut oil, despite containing about 1% of the unstable PUFA, can be left in a bucket at room temperature for a year or more without showing any evidence of deterioration, suggesting that the predominance of saturated fat acts as an antioxidant for the unsaturated molecules. In the body, the saturated fats seem to act the same way, preventing or even reversing many of the conditions caused by oxidation of fats.

The stress-induced liberation of arachidonic acid causes blood vessels to leak, and this allows fibrin to escape from the blood stream, into the basement membrane and beyond into the extracellular matrix, where it produces fibrosis. (Cancer, autoimmune diseases, and heart disease involve the same inflammatory, thrombotic, fibrotic processes as the nominal fibroses.) Scleroderma, liver cirrhosis, fibrosis of the lungs, heart, and other organs, and all the diseases in which fibrous tissue becomes dense and progressively contracts, involve similar processes, and the treatments which are successful are those that stop the inflammation produced by the oxidation of the polyunsaturated fatty acids.

Retroperitoneal fibrosis is now known to be produced by estrogen, and is treated by antiestrogenic and antiserotonergic drugs, but as early as 1940 Alejandro Lipschutz demonstrated that chronic exposure to very low doses of estrogen produced fibromas in essentially every part of the body. Earlier, Loeb had studied the action of large doses of estrogen, which produced fibrosis of the uterus, as if it had accelerated aging. Following Lipschutz' work, in which he demonstrated the “antifibromatogenic” actions of pregnenolone and progesterone, several Argentine researchers showed that progesterone prevented and cured abdominal adhesions and other fibrotic conditions, including retroperitoneal fibrosis.

Since estrogen produces both leakiness of the capillaries and excessive formation of fibrin, its effects will be seen first in the organs where it concentrates, but eventually anywhere capillaries leak fibrin. Estrogen activates the phospholipase which liberates arachidonic acid, and progesterone inhibits that phospholipase.

As the fat tissues become more burdened with arachidonic acid, they release it more easily in response to moderately lipolytic stress signals. This could explain the increased levels of free fatty acids and lipid peroxidation that occur with aging. In animals that are “deficient” in the polyunsaturated fatty acids, adrenalin doesn't have the lipolytic effect that it does in animals on the standard diet. With aging, there is not only a tendency to have chronically higher free fatty acids in the blood, but for those fatty acids to be more unsaturated. The phospholipids of mitochondria and microsomes become more unsaturated with aging (Laganiere and Yu, 1993, Lee, et al., 1999). In the human retina there is a similar accumulation of PUFA with aging (Nourooz-Zadeh and Pereira, 1999), which implies that the aged retina will be more easily damaged by light.

Several studies suggest that a high degree of unsaturation in the fats is fundamentally related to the aging process, since long lived species have a lower degree of unsaturation in their fats. Caloric restriction decreases the age-related accumulation of the fatty acids with 4 and 5 double bonds.

Although publicity has emphasized the anti-inflammatory effects of fish oil, experiments show that it is extremely effective in producing alcohol-related liver cirrhosis. Breakdown products of polyunsaturated fats (isoprostanes and 4-HNE) are found in the blood of people with alcoholic liver disease (Aleynik, et al., 1998). In the absence of polyunsaturated fats, alcohol doesn't produce cirrhosis. Saturated fats allow the fibrosis to regress:

“A diet enriched in saturated fatty acids effectively reverses alcohol-induced necrosis, inflammation, and fibrosis despite continued alcohol consumption. The therapeutic effects of saturated fatty acids may be explained, at least in part, by reduced endotoxemia and lipid peroxidation....” (Nanji, et al., 1995, 2001)

In these studies, the animals were switched from fish oil to either palm oil or medium chain triglycerides (a major fraction of coconut oil). In other studies, Knittel, et al. (1995), show that fibrinogen, in “a clotting-like process,” is involved in the development of liver fibrosis, and that this appears to provide a basis for the growth of additional extracellular matrix.

Brown, et al. (1989), discussed this developmental process (leaky capillaries, fibrosis) in relation to wound healing, lung disease, and tumor growth.

The relatively few studies of fish oil and linoleic acid that compare them with palmitic acid or coconut oil have produced some very important results. For example, pigs exposed to endotoxin developed severe lung problems (resembling “shock lung”) when they had been on a diet with either fish oil or Intralipid (which is mostly linoleic acid, used for intravenous feeding in hospitals), but not after palmitic acid (Wolfe, et al., 2002).

Eating low-fat seafood (sole, whitefish, turbot, scallops, oysters, lobster, shrimp, squid, etc.) once in a while can provide useful trace minerals, without much risk. However, fish from some parts of the ocean contain industrial contaminants in the fat, and large fish such as tuna, swordfish, Chilean sea bass and halibut contain toxic amounts of mercury in the muscles. Chilean sea bass (Patagonian toothfish) is very high in fat, too.

About ten years ago I met a young man with a degenerative brain disease, and was interested in the fact that he (working on a fishing boat) had been eating almost a pound of salmon per day for several years. There is now enough information regarding the neurotoxic effects of fish oil to justify avoidance of the fatty fish.

Some of the current advertising is promoting fish oil to prevent cancer, so it's important to remember that there are many studies showing that it increases cancer.

The developmental and physiological significance of the type of fatty acid in the diet has been established for a long time, but cultural stereotypes and commercial interests are threatened by it, so it can't be discussed publicly.
If someone wanted to deliberately make a population controllable by eroding their health, this would be a very good way to do it.

Last edited by al209; 29-07-2011 at 10:40 PM.
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Old 29-07-2011, 11:11 PM   #2
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There needs to be a balance of n-3 and n-6 in the body. (omegas)

A deficiency in one, will cause health problems.

Fats that Heal, Fats that Kill

Quote:
The two essential fatty acids are called omega-6 (n-6) and omega-3 (n-3). N-6 (linoleic acid; LA) was established as “essential” in 1930, but n-3 (alpha-linolenic acid; ALA) essentiality for humans was established only in 1981, the year after I was poisoned and began to study fats. The timing was perfect to get in on applying this new information about n-3 being essential, which very few people knew at that time.


Over the past 20 years a great deal of research has been done on n-3. That research can be summed up in one sentence. Increasing intake of n-3 in the diet improves almost all of the degenerative conditions of our time. This is because they are essential for health. Every cell, tissue, gland, and organ must have them to function normally, and most people don’t get enough.

The third important thing I learned was that I became n-6 deficient by using flax oil as the only source of fat in my diet. This happened because flax is three and a half to four times richer in n-3 than n-6. N-3 and n-6 compete in the body for space on enzymes that convert these essential fatty acids into derivatives and hormones.

Too much n-3 crowds out n-6. Too much n-6 crowds out n-3. Flax oil has so much n-3 and so little n-6 that after a few months of exclusive use of this oil, n-6 deficiency results. I got dry eyes, skipped heart beats, heart beat abnormalities, and thin dry papery skin. Others reported more infections, eczema and psoriasis-like skin problems. And new research indicates that the high n-3, low n-6 ratio of flax can also increase cancer due to immune system deterioration from an n-6 deficiency. One can reverse all of these symptoms by changing the ratio (decreasing n-3 or increasing n-6 over what flax oil supplies).

The traditional Inuit (Eskimo) diet provides the highest in n-3/n-6 ratio in the world. It is two and a half times richer in n-3 than n-6. Three and a half to four times is too high. I did the experiment on myself and that’s when I realized we should be getting more n-6, also made with health rather than shelf life in mind. So, we have n-6 in the blend I formulated in quantities sufficient to prevent n-6 deficiencies but still emphasize n-3 because they also offer great health benefits.

Some people say that we should use flax oil because people get lots of n-6. You know they’re not interested in health when they say that, because the n-6 they’re recommending are damaged, provide toxic molecules (1 million for every one of the body’s 60 trillion cells), and increase inflammation and cancer.

To improve their health, I want people off those “white” oils just as I want people to avoid white sugar and white flour. To improve their health, I want people to use oils made with health in mind with the ratio on n-3 & n-6 that is optimal, just like I want them to use molasses and stevia instead of sugar.
Hemp seeds have the perfect combination of omega 3-6-9. drink hemp milk every day!
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Old 29-07-2011, 11:21 PM   #3
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after much deliberation, to-ing and fro-ing and research over the past few days i've decided to go back to my previous low-fat diet. i believe that low-fat, high carb, high raw is the way to go. the problems i experienced on my previous diet related to too much sugar not lack of fat, so i'm going to keep the fruit 0-low just for now. interestingly Max Gerson found that when patients were given any form of plant fat as in nuts/seeds...etc their tumours grew. there's so much evidence for keeping the fat low it's ridiculous. the high-fat approach seems unappealing, illogical and difficult for me personally, and am henceforth switching back. i have to listen to my gut feeling.
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Old 29-07-2011, 11:25 PM   #4
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after much deliberation, to-ing and fro-ing and research over the past few days i've decided to go back to my previous low-fat diet. i have to listen to my gut feeling.
Blessings of Health and Happiness to you and your family, lulushka
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Old 29-07-2011, 11:40 PM   #5
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Blessings of Health and Happiness to you and your family, lulushka
thank you Akana, you're a sweetheart same to you.
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Old 30-07-2011, 05:23 AM   #6
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Interesting article, could be why the low fat raw vegan seems to work the best or even low fat vegan diets. Animals foods such as meat are also extraoridinary high in omega 6 fats unless it is wild meat which is low in saturated fat and high in omega 3 type fats. all farmed meat is high in omega 6 even organically farmed.

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Old 30-07-2011, 07:27 AM   #7
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Lol, the omega-3 omega-6 ratio in the meat of livestock is wholly effected by the diet of the animal. An animal with a diet high in grain, hay and/or silage is going to be high in omega 6 and saturated fat. An animal with a diet high in grass, even with a small amount of supplementation will have a much more balanced ratio which is easily balanced in us by also consuming fish.

Honestly though, I would easily gamble on free range duck eggs and cow's milk for being the perfect foods grown on land to eat to the point of exclusion of most other things.
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Old 30-07-2011, 10:20 AM   #8
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I thought fats are the best fuel source for YOU...not cancer! I thought it was sugar
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Old 30-07-2011, 11:07 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by akana View Post
There needs to be a balance of n-3 and n-6 in the body. (omegas)

A deficiency in one, will cause health problems.

Fats that Heal, Fats that Kill



Hemp seeds have the perfect combination of omega 3-6-9. drink hemp milk every day!
Akana, your missing the point of the article. It has never been proven that these fats are essential, and even if they were, the amounts required are so small that the tiny amounts present in all foods are more than adequate. The more we take into our diet, the more our tissues will degenerate over time. Udo Erasmus, they guy you have quoted, is an oil supplement salesman, and promoting "essential fatty acids" in a particular ratio is big business for him.
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Old 30-07-2011, 11:08 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by akana View Post
There needs to be a balance of n-3 and n-6 in the body. (omegas)

A deficiency in one, will cause health problems.

Fats that Heal, Fats that Kill



Hemp seeds have the perfect combination of omega 3-6-9. drink hemp milk every day!
Nice post
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Old 30-07-2011, 11:08 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by lulushka8 View Post
after much deliberation, to-ing and fro-ing and research over the past few days i've decided to go back to my previous low-fat diet. i believe that low-fat, high carb, high raw is the way to go. the problems i experienced on my previous diet related to too much sugar not lack of fat, so i'm going to keep the fruit 0-low just for now. interestingly Max Gerson found that when patients were given any form of plant fat as in nuts/seeds...etc their tumours grew. there's so much evidence for keeping the fat low it's ridiculous. the high-fat approach seems unappealing, illogical and difficult for me personally, and am henceforth switching back. i have to listen to my gut feeling.
Dont throw the baby out with the bathwater! Not all fats are created equal. Coconut fat is vegan and has a multitude of health benefits.
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Old 30-07-2011, 11:14 AM   #12
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Nice post
Domathy, im guessing that you sell Udo's Choice as part of your supplement range?
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Old 30-07-2011, 11:18 AM   #13
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Akana, your missing the point of the article. It has never been proven that these fats are essential, and even if they were, the amounts required are so small that the tiny amounts present in all foods are more than adequate. The more we take into our diet, the more our tissues will degenerate over time. Udo Erasmus, they guy you have quoted, is an oil supplement salesman, and promoting "essential fatty acids" in a particular ratio is big business for him.
To be fair, all you have done is quoted an article which is pure specualtion.

Every single red blood cell has a lipid membrane made of omega 3 and 6 fatty acids. 2-4 million RBC produced every second. Blood cells become body cells and the brain is something like 80% EFA's. To say we only need a 'small' amount is not accurate.

When i look at live blood under a microscope, most people are so deficient in EFA's that their cell membranes are weak and flimsy. If i gently crush the slide with the objective the cells pop and disorganise. After 3 months (life span of RBS's) of Udos, barleans or pure hemp milk the RBC membrane is tough and resiliant. I can crush the slide and the cells keep their integrity.
The article you site is wrong. Something I'd expect to find on quackwatch.
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Old 30-07-2011, 11:19 AM   #14
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Domathy, im guessing that you sell Udo's Choice as part of your supplement range?
It needs to be refrigerated so its not practical to stock that product. I always advocate raw hemp as a source of oils. You could live off the hemp plant.
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Old 30-07-2011, 11:28 AM   #15
domathy
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Hemolysis/shadow cells before and after pics. Classic omega 3&6 deficiency profile. You need omega oils to build a good cell membrane








As you can see, chlorophyll is good for building hemoglobin (the 'inside' bit of the cell that holds oxygen). Even the red cross admits this (though money is in blood not chlorophyll)

The blood never lies

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Old 30-07-2011, 11:44 AM   #16
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Hemolysis (cont.)
• Fats: Omega 3 has 3 breaks, omega 6 has 6 breaks within it’s chain that is unsaturated with hydrogen so its more flexible and usable by the body, omega 9 has 9 breaks. Body uses saturated fats for energy but can’t use it to build membranes because it’s not pliable enough. There are saturated fats in every oil.
• Hemp seed, Borage seed and flax seed has a higher ratio of unsaturated fats to saturated fats. To build cells we want a 3:1 ratio. Some of the mixed oils like Udo’s oil, Manitoba Harvest and Essential Balance may be even higher. For diabetics moving from carbohydrate metabolism to fat metabolism takes stress off the pancreas. Provides secretin, insulin and glucogen. Alpha cells and beta cells.
• Take 5 to 6 tablespoons up to 12 tablespoons, the more active you are the higher fat content you need.

• Healthy Fats:
• Protective to store acids (fats buffer acids)
• Lubricants
• Help build bi-lipid layer of the cell membrane – strength of the cell is determined by the good fats
• Used for energy
• Helps support the endocrine or energy system with less acidic waste
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Old 30-07-2011, 11:49 AM   #17
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To be fair, all you have done is quoted an article which is pure specualtion.

Every single red blood cell has a lipid membrane made of omega 3 and 6 fatty acids. 2-4 million RBC produced every second. Blood cells become body cells and the brain is something like 80% EFA's. To say we only need a 'small' amount is not accurate.

When i look at live blood under a microscope, most people are so deficient in EFA's that their cell membranes are weak and flimsy. If i gently crush the slide with the objective the cells pop and disorganise. After 3 months (life span of RBS's) of Udos, barleans or pure hemp milk the RBC membrane is tough and resiliant. I can crush the slide and the cells keep their integrity.
The article you site is wrong. Something I'd expect to find on quackwatch.
Speculation eh? Im guessing you didnt read the article's references then?

Seeing as you place so much stock in quackwatch, im sure you will have read the following article

Live Blood Cell Analysis:Another Gimmick to Sell You Something
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Old 30-07-2011, 11:49 AM   #18
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Akana, your missing the point of the article. It has never been proven that these fats are essential, and even if they were, the amounts required are so small that the tiny amounts present in all foods are more than adequate. The more we take into our diet, the more our tissues will degenerate over time. Udo Erasmus, they guy you have quoted, is an oil supplement salesman, and promoting "essential fatty acids" in a particular ratio is big business for him.
i have to agree with you al, i've read so many medical articles about how the amounts we really need are so small, we could get most our needs from just eating green vegetables. in fact i never had dry skin before until i started my fatty experiment! how could we possibly be designed to need spoons of mixed udos oils to be healthy anyway.

Last edited by lulushka8; 30-07-2011 at 11:53 AM.
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Old 30-07-2011, 11:51 AM   #19
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Default Myelin sheath and fatty acids

Despite this decade's medical explanation, a description of the 'real' Multiple Sclerosis occurs when the myelin sheath becomes sufficiently damaged from over-acidity. The myelin sheath is an electrically insulating phospholipid layer that surrounds the axons of many neurons. It is kind of like the rubber coating on a power cord that keep the electricity traveling forward rather then shooting out in all directions--virtually all over the place.

The main function of a myelin sheath is to increase the speed at which electrical impulses transmit and spread along the myelinated fibers. Along unmyelinated fibers (which are those nerve fibers that lack a fatty sheath) impulses move continuously as waves. But in myelinated fibers, they hop or advance quickly by leaps. Myelin increases resistance across the cell membrane by a factor of 5,000 and decreases the ability to collect a
charge of electricity by a factor of 50. Thus, the impulses keep moving and are not absorbed.

Myelination also helps prevent the electrical current from leaving the axon. When a peripheral fiber is severed, the myelin sheath provides a track along
which regrowth can occur because it is essential that the body be able to repair itself. Myelin is composed of about 80% lipid fat (omega 3&6) and about 20% protein.

Remember that fat is a major buffer of acidity!

From the perspective of the 'New Biology,' (Dr Robert Young's alkaline theorys) the loss of the myelin sheath insulating the nerves, otherwise known as demyelination, is caused by glucose, acetlyaldehyde,
lactic acid, alcohol and other acids stripping this 'fatty sheath' off the nerves. When myelin degrades, conduction of signals along the nerve can be impaired or lost. The nerve then eventually withers.

One of my foundational theories is that the body uses fat as a primary buffer of acidity. This is the hallmark of nerodegenerative autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's Alzheimers or Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS).

Medical science believes that the immune system plays a role in the demyelination associated with such diseases as MS or ALS but the 'New Biology' does not support this. We believe that the demyelination is caused by metabolic and gastointestinal acids.

The predominant theory of today's medical science is that MS results from attacks by an individual's immune system on the nervous system and is therefore usually categorized
as an autoimmune disease. To the contrary, it is actually caused by the consumption of excess sugar (acid), carbohydrates (acid), high sugar fruit, fruit juices and exotic
fruit drinks (acid), artificial sweeteners (acid), heavy metal poisoning (acidic toxin), animal proteins (acid),dairy products including cheese, yogurt, ice-cream (acid),
emotional stress from anger, fear or worry (acid), EMF from cell phones, hair dryers computer, TV's and
electric motors (acid) and even from toxins that come from taking medication which includes mercury (more acid). Even small amounts of mercury have been shown to be
particularly destructive to nerve sheaths.

The white blood cells actually function like 'garbage collectors.' We can observe this in live blood analysis.
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Old 30-07-2011, 11:53 AM   #20
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Speculation eh? Im guessing you didnt read the article's references then?

Seeing as you place so much stock in quackwatch, im sure you will have read the following article

Live Blood Cell Analysis:Another Gimmick to Sell You Something
Always the insults with you

I could make way more money in direct sales - believe me i could. I have stuck with this line of work (even though i would often rather pack it all in) because i have been able to help so many people.

Im telling you that i can see omega 3&6 deficiency in the blood. I know you wont recognise my objective observations as legitimate but im just posting this info for the benefit of other readers.

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