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Old 01-12-2018, 07:34 PM   #1
cosmicpurpose1.618
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Default has anyone ever had a laughing fit?

I just had one and it actually felt really good

Like someone was telling me really funny jokes about every five seconds, that I couldn't help laughing for at for at least five seconds each...

for like 10-15 minutes in total, I'm not sure how long it went on


Anyone experienced this?
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Old 01-12-2018, 08:23 PM   #2
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“Have you also learned that secret from the river; that there is no such thing as time?" That the river is everywhere at the same time, at the source and at the mouth, at the waterfall, at the ferry, at the current, in the ocean and in the mountains, everywhere and that the present only exists for it, not the shadow of the past nor the shadow of the future.” ? Hermann Hesse, Siddhartha

Y Gwir Erbyn Y Byd ("Truth Against the World") - Druidic Motto
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Old 01-12-2018, 09:19 PM   #3
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Old 01-12-2018, 09:26 PM   #4
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I had one the other day at this meme - I was literally rolling on the floor - bit random - can't recall the last time I really went off on one

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Old 01-12-2018, 09:44 PM   #5
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I struggle to 'lol' can't remember last time I was so tickled. Probably Colin Mochrie on whose line is it anyway, random improv for the win!
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Old 01-12-2018, 10:42 PM   #6
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The PM gives Brexit speech ,,



Then relaxes at home ,,

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Old 01-12-2018, 10:48 PM   #7
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I remember when those strange people did 'laughter chains' on skype'

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Old 01-12-2018, 11:02 PM   #8
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has anyone ever had a laughing fit?
Yes, when I ate space cake. Never again.
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Old 01-12-2018, 11:46 PM   #9
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Yes but my face turns ugly
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Old 02-12-2018, 10:45 AM   #10
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I used to get the laughing fit thing at school in class. I remember my mate and I got thrown out into the hallway for doing it once, and then the teacher came bursting out to tear us new ones, and he looked so angry that we literally dropped to our knees in hysterics.

Detention.

Also happened in a board room meeting when I worked for a bank. This guy from another branch sat next to me and my manager, and he looked and talked exactly like a white, gay Eddie Murphy...but he didn't know it. Everything he said was accidentally funnier than the last thing, and me and her kept making each other piss ourselves every time he spoke. It got to the point where we were making fools of ourselves in front of the whole management group. Bottling that up was a nightmare. Thought my lungs were going to explode out of my ass.

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Old 03-12-2018, 11:33 PM   #11
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this set me off
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Old 08-12-2018, 07:32 PM   #12
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Laughter is a strange phenomenon indeed. Let’s check this study by physician doctor William B. Strean that's to die by laughter…

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Laughter prescription
William B. Strean, PhD

Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer
This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.

Laughter is the tonic, the relief, the surcease for pain.

Charlie Chaplin


It has been more than 30 years since Norman Cousins published an article in the New England Journal of Medicine1 extolling the potential medicinal benefits of laughter and humour. Yet the study of laughter still occupies a rather modest place in scientific inquiry.2 It was not until 1995 that laughter as an exercise, or laughter yoga,emerged systematically through laughter clubs. The popularity of such laughter programs has grown markedly during the past decade. With increasing recognition, one might expect that there would be growing application of laughter and humour for their complementary and alternative medical benefits. (It should be noted that laughter is an adjunct to and not a replacement for accepted therapies.) They are easy to prescribe and there are no substantial concerns with respect to dose, side effects, or allergies. It seems, however, that the medical community has been reluctant to embrace and support laughter for health.
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History and importance of the role of humour in medicine
Humour researchers3–8 have reported shortcomings of studies on the physiologic effects of laughter. For example, “Taken together, the empirical studies reviewed ... provide little evidence for unique positive effects of humor and laughter on health-related variables.”4 Other commentators have cautioned practitioners about advocating the benefits of laughter, fashioning themselves as self-styled laughter police. “For practitioners to implement credible programs and effectively teach self-management techniques, further empirical research on the physical, psychosocial, debonafide [sic], and placebo effects of humor and laughter needs to be conducted.”9 Furthermore, Bennett10 argued that although humour and laughter have been the focus of attention in the popular media and medical literature, and despite statements about the health benefits of humour, current research was insufficient to validate such claims. He identified support for the role of humour and laughter in other areas, including patient-physician communication, psychological aspects of patient care, medical education, and reducing stress among medical professionals. It is also important to note that while humour and laughter are often connected, there are some important distinctions. For example, laughter yoga produces laughter and the concomitant physiologic benefits without the use of humour; humour without laughter might not produce those benefits and potentially could have adverse effects on the therapeutic relationship.
When considering new pharmacologic interventions or invasive procedures, it is quite appropriate to place the onus of proof of efficacy on the creator of the protocol. This mind-set is driven by appropriate concerns for false-positive errors. Given the side effects and inherent risks associated with pharmaceuticals, one exercises caution to be clear that the intended effect is achieved beyond reasonably considered chance factors. Thus recommendations suggest P values be set conservatively and techniques employed to avoid a “false discovery rate.”11
Similar thinking seems to have been applied to the consideration of laughter’s potential medicinal effects. Although proponents of laughter and humour can be traced back to the Bible (“A merry heart doeth good like a medicine, but a broken spirit drieth the bones” [Proverbs 17:22]), and a variety of medical benefits of laughter have been supported through research, the scales seem to remain tipped markedly in the direction of caution.
The most positive claim that researchers seem willing to make is that “current research indicates that using humor is well accepted by the public and is frequently used as a coping mechanism. However, the scientific evidence of the benefits of using humor on various health related outcomes still leaves many questions unanswered.”12
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Biology of laughter and humour
There are, however, several good reasons to conclude that laughter is effective as an intervention. Although the evidence (detailed below) demonstrating laughter’s benefits could be stronger, virtually all studies of laughter and health indicate positive results. Similarly, there are almost no negative side effects or undesirable ramifications associated with laughter as an intervention. This is a case in which the appropriate logic might be more akin to the legal perspective of “innocent until proven guilty.”
Yet, given the prevailing orientation toward laughter as an intervention, an exhaustive review of the medical literature to assess demonstrated benefits of laughter was completed. Several databases were searched for all occurrences of laughter, and reviews of laughter and humour2,4,13,14 were examined. The intent was to find studies related to benefits of laughter and laughter effects. Although the literature contains “an abundance of non–evidence-based opinion”14 exploring how laughter and humour should or should not be applied in medical settings, there is also a substantial body of well-researched information demonstrating many benefits and potential benefits of laughter and humour. Future studies might enhance the literature by considering that laughter is highly social and examining laughter in social settings. Furthermore, careful descriptive work linking physiologic systems with types, kinds, and contexts of laughter will be valuable.2
Morse’s conclusion about laughter and humour in the dental setting summarized the literature to date: “Laughter and humor are not beneficial for everyone, but since there are no negative side effects, they should be used ... to help reduce stress and pain and to improve healing.15 Findings range from suggesting that, in addition to a stress-relief effect, laughter can bring about feelings of being uplifted or fulfilled16 to showing that the act of laughter can lead to immediate increases in heart rate, respiratory rate, respiratory depth, and oxygen consumption.17 These increases are then followed by a period of muscle relaxation, with a corresponding decrease in heart rate, respiratory rate, and blood pressure.
Overall, the arguments against using laughter as an intervention appear to be both unduly cautious and based on the desire for more evidence. The arguments in favour of laughter as an intervention are grounded in the virtually universal positive results associated with existing studies of laughter. Although scholars and practitioners recognize the value of further study, more replication, and identification of specifics, the call for more application of laughter as an intervention seems warranted. Perhaps it is time to usher in a new era in which we reverse our concerns about errors.
It might be time to start giving more credence to positive views about laughter, such as that laughter might reduce stress and improve natural killer cell activity. As low natural killer cell activity is linked to decreased disease resistance and increased morbidity in those with cancer or HIV disease, laughter might be a useful cognitive-behavioural intervention.18
The many voices of cancer survivors and of those who have employed laughter in their recoveries supply further promising support. One such person, Scott Burton, said, “The other reactions; anger, depression, suppression, denial, took a little piece of me with them. Each made me feel just a little less human. Yet laughter made me more open to ideas, more inviting to others, and even a little stronger inside. It proved to me that, even as my body was devastated and my spirit challenged, I was still a vital human.”19 Perhaps medical prescription of laughter and humour can illuminate what cancer patients already know; studies have shown that 50% of cancer patients used humour20 and 21% of a group of breast cancer patients used humour or laughter therapy.21
Go to:
Clinical evidence
As Rosner22 reported, randomized controlled clinical trials have not been conducted validating the therapeutic efficacy of laughter. Benefits, however, have been reported in geriatrics,23 oncology,24–26 critical care,27psychiatry,28,29 rehabilitation,30 rheumatology,1 home care,31 palliative care,32 hospice care,33 terminal care,34and general patient care.35 These and other reports constitute sufficient substantiation to support what is experientially evident—laughter and humour are therapeutic allies in healing.
One area where questions remain is the effect of laughter on the so-called stress hormones: epinephrine, norepinephrine, and cortisol. This is important because it is theorized that if laughter does, in fact, decrease stress hormones, this would be one mechanism that might explain the proposed connection between laughter and immune function, and from there to improved health outcomes.17
“The relationship between humor and health is a complex one. Groucho Marx once noted that ‘A clown is like an aspirin, only he works twice as fast.’ Patch Adams, the founder of the Gesundheit community, where laughter therapy is a daily medical routine, would no doubt agree. Both men, to do their work, require a community—the former as an audience and the latter to magnify the power of the healing response. After all, half of the fun in laughter, as well as healing, is sharing it.”36 Yet, research might not be ready and able to measure and understand the complexities of how laughter works, particularly when laughter occurs in a group environment, such as laughter clubs. “The prevailing medical paradigm has no capacity to incorporate the concept that a relationship is a physiologic process, as real and as potent as any pill or surgical procedure.”37
Go to:
Clinical bottom line
As Robert Provine, the noted laughter researcher, commented in the documentary Laugh Out Loud, “Until the scientists work out all the details, get in all the laughter that you can!”38 Medical practitioners could begin to help patients get more laughter in their lives. Following the announcement of a study of the benefits of laughter on endothelial function,39 Dr Michael Miller, one of the study’s authors, said he envisioned a time when physicians might recommend that everyone get 15 to 20 minutes of laughter in a day in the same way they recommend at least 30 minutes of exercise. Although physicians’ advice about health-promoting behaviour might have a limited effect in some cases,40 it can certainly be a catalyst for change.41 Specifically, medical practitioners might acquaint themselves with opportunities such as laughter clubs, which are available for their patients and provide information and endorsements. Let us begin to consider that, along with eating your vegetables and getting enough sleep, laughter is a sound prescription as a wonderful way to enhance health.
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Footnotes
This article has been peer reviewed.
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Competing interests
None declared
The opinions expressed in commentaries are those of the authors. Publication does not imply endorsement by the College of Family Physicians of Canada.
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References
1. Cousins N. Anatomy of an illness as perceived by the patient. N Engl J Med. 1976;295(26):1458–63.[PubMed]
2. Devereux PG, Heffner KL. Psychophysiological approaches to the study of laughter: toward an integration with positive psychology. In: Ong AD, van Dulmen MHM, editors. Oxford handbook of methods in positive psychology. New York, NY: Oxford University Press; 2007. pp. 233–49.
3. Berk RA. Humor as an instructional defibrillator: evidence-based techniques in teaching and assessment.Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing; 2002.
4. Martin RA. Humor, laughter, and physical health: methodological issues and research findings. Psychol Bull.2001;127(4):504–19. [PubMed]
5. Martin RA. Is laughter the best medicine? Humor, laughter, and physical health. Curr Dir Psychol Sci.2002;11(6):216–20.
6. McGhee PE. Health, healing and the amuse system: humor as survival training. 3rd ed. Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt; 1999.
7. McGhee PE. Comprehensive review of humor research. Paper presented at: Annual Meeting of the Association for Applied and Therapeutic Humor; 2002; Baltimore, MD.
8. Provine RR. Laughter: a scientific investigation. New York, NY: Viking Penguin; 2000.
9. MacDonald CM. A chuckle a day keeps the doctor away: therapeutic humor and laughter. J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2004;42(3):18–25. [PubMed]
10. Bennett HJ. Humor in medicine. South Med J. 2003;96(12):1257–61. [PubMed]
11. Curran-Everett D. Multiple comparisons: philosophies and illustrations. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2000;279(1):R1–8. [PubMed]
12. Bennett MP, Lengacher CA. Humor and laughter may influence health. I. History and background. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2006;3(1):61–3. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
13. Berk RA. The active ingredients in humor: psychophysiological benefits and risks for older adults. Educ Gerontol. 2001;27(3–4):323–39.
14. McCreaddie M, Wiggins S. The purpose and function of humour in health, health care and nursing: a narrative review. J Adv Nurs. 2008;61(6):584–95. [PubMed]
15. Morse DR. Use of humor to reduce stress and pain and enhance healing in the dental setting. J N J Dent Assoc. 2007;78(4):32–6. [PubMed]
16. Toda M, Kusakabe S, Nagasawa S, Kitamura K, Morimoto K. Effect of laughter on salivary endocrinological stress marker chromogranin A. Biomed Res. 2007;28(2):115–8. [PubMed]
17. Bennett MP, Lengacher C. Humor and laughter may influence health. III. Laughter and health outcomes. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2008;5(1):37–40. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
18. Bennett MP, Zeller JM, Rosenberg L, McCann J. The effect of mirthful laughter on stress and natural killer cell activity. Altern Ther Health Med. 2003;9(2):38–45. [PubMed]
19. Burton S. Why not laugh? Minneapolis, MN: Inconvenience Productions; 2003. [Accessed 2008 Feb 11]. Available from: www.sburton.com/whynotlaugh.htm.
20. Bennett M, Lengacher C. Use of complementary therapies in a rural cancer population. Oncol Nurs Forum.1999;26(8):1287–94. [PubMed]
21. Lengacher CA, Bennett MP, Kip KE, Keller R, La Vance MS, Smith LS, et al. Frequency of use of complementary and alternative medicine in women with breast cancer. Oncol Nurs Forum. 2002;29(10):1445–52.[PubMed]
22. Rosner F. Therapeutic efficacy of laughter in medicine. Cancer Invest. 2002;20(3):434–6. [PubMed]
23. Williams H. Humor and healing: therapeutic effects in geriatrics. Gerontion. 1986;1(3):14–7. [PubMed]
24. Bellert JL. Humor. A therapeutic approach in oncology nursing. Cancer Nurs. 1989;12(2):65–70. [PubMed]
25. Erdman L. Laughter therapy for patients with cancer. Oncol Nurs Forum. 1991;18(8):1359–63. [PubMed]
26. Trent B. Ottawa lodges add humour to armamentarium in fight against cancer. CMAJ. 1990;142(2):163–4. 166. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
27. Leiber DB. Laughter and humor in critical care. Dimens Crit Care Nurs. 1976;5:162–70. [PubMed]
28. Saper B. The therapeutic use of humor for psychiatric disturbances of adolescents and adults. Psychiatr Q.1990;61(4):261–72. [PubMed]
29. Gelkopf M, Kreitler S, Sigal M. Laughter in a psychiatric ward. Somatic, emotional, social, and clinical influences on schizophrenic patients. J Nerv Ment Dis. 1993;181(5):283–9. [PubMed]
30. Basmajian JV. The elixir of laughter in rehabilitation. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1998;79(12):1597. [PubMed]
31. Hunter P. Humor therapy in home care. Caring. 1997;16(9):56–7. [PubMed]
32. Dean RA. Humor and laughter in palliative care. J Palliat Care. 1997;13(1):34–9. [PubMed]
33. Balzer JW. Humor—a missing ingredient in collaborative practice. Holist Nurs Pract. 1993;7(4):28–35.[PubMed]
34. Herth K. Contributions of humor as perceived by the terminally ill. Am J Hosp Care. 1990;7(1):36–40.[PubMed]
35. Mallett J. Use of humour and laughter in patient care. Br J Nurs. 1993;2(3):172–5. [PubMed]
36. Balick MJ, Lee R. The role of laughter in traditional medicine and its relevance to the clinical setting: healing with ha! Altern Ther Health Med. 2003;9(4):88–91. [PubMed]
37. Lewis T, Amini F, Lannon R. A general theory of love. New York, NY: Random House; 2000. pp. 80–1.
38. Wilson S. The world is flat (tee hee). Perspectives on humor research. Humor Connect. 2004. [Accessed 2009 Jun 19]. p. 5. Available from: www.aath.org/humor_connection/Summer04.pdf.
39. Miller M, Mangano C, Park Y, Goel R, Plotnick GD, Vogel RA. Impact of cinematic viewing on endothelial function. Heart. 2006;92(2):261–2. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
40. Eden KB, Orleans CT, Mulrow CD, Pender NJ, Teutsch SM. Does counseling by clinicians improve physical activity? A summary of the evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Ann Intern Med.2002;137(3):208–15. [PubMed]
41. Kreuter MW, Chheda SG, Bull FC. How does physician advice influence patient behavior? Evidence for a priming effect. Arch Fam Med. 2000;9(5):426–33. [PubMed]
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Articles from Canadian Family Physician are provided here courtesy of College of Family Physicians of Canada
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Similar articles in PubMed
• Humor.[Psychiatr Clin North Am. 2014]
• The gift of laughter.[Urol Nurs. 2004]
• The therapeutic value of laughter in medicine.[Altern Ther Health Med. 2010]
• Humor as natural medicine.[Midwifery Today Int Midwife. 2...]
• [Helpful laughter and psychotherapy].[Soins Psychiatr. 2004]
See reviews...See all...
Cited by other articles in PMC
• Osho Dynamic Meditation’s Effect on Serum Cortisol Level[Journal of Clinical and Diagno...]
• Patient-reported functioning in major depressive disorder[Therapeutic Advances in Chroni...]
• Laughter and Stress Relief in Cancer Patients: A Pilot Study[Evidence-based Complementary a...]
• Quality of Life in Major Depressive Disorder Before/After Multiple Steps of Treatment and One-year Follow-up[Acta psychiatrica Scandinavica...]
See all...
Links
• PubMed
Recent Activity
ClearTurn Off
• Laughter prescription
Laughter prescription
Canadian Family Physician. 2009 Oct; 55(10)965
See more...
• Review Multiple comparisons: philosophies and illustrations.[Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2000]
• Humor and laughter may influence health. I. History and background.[Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2006]
• Review Humor, laughter, and physical health: methodological issues and research findings.[Psychol Bull. 2001]
• Review The purpose and function of humour in health, health care and nursing: a narrative review.[J Adv Nurs. 2008]
• Use of humor to reduce stress and pain and enhance healing in the dental setting.[J N J Dent Assoc. 2007]
• Effect of laughter on salivary endocrinological stress marker chromogranin A.[Biomed Res. 2007]
• Humor and Laughter May Influence Health: III. Laughter and Health Outcomes.[Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2008]
• The effect of mirthful laughter on stress and natural killer cell activity.[Altern Ther Health Med. 2003]
• Use of complementary therapies in a rural cancer population.[Oncol Nurs Forum. 1999]
• Frequency of use of complementary and alternative medicine in women with breast cancer.[Oncol Nurs Forum. 2002]
• Therapeutic efficacy of laughter in medicine.[Cancer Invest. 2002]
• Humor and healing: therapeutic effects in geriatrics.[Gerontion. 1986]
See more ...
• Humor and Laughter May Influence Health: III. Laughter and Health Outcomes.[Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2008]
• Review The role of laughter in traditional medicine and its relevance to the clinical setting: healing with ha![Altern Ther Health Med. 2003]
• Impact of cinematic viewing on endothelial function.[Heart. 2006]
• Review Does counseling by clinicians improve physical activity? A summary of the evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.[Ann Intern Med. 2002]
• How does physician advice influence patient behavior? Evidence for a priming effect.[Arch Fam Med. 2000]
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Save items
Similar articles in PubMed
Humor.
[Psychiatr Clin North Am. 2014]
The gift of laughter.
[Urol Nurs. 2004]
The therapeutic value of laughter in medicine.
[Altern Ther Health Med. 2010]
Humor as natural medicine.
[Midwifery Today Int Midwife. 2...]
[Helpful laughter and psychotherapy].
[Soins Psychiatr. 2004]
See reviews...
See all...
Cited by other articles in PMC
Osho Dynamic Meditation’s Effect on Serum Cortisol Level
[Journal of Clinical and Diagno...]
Patient-reported functioning in major depressive disorder
[Therapeutic Advances in Chroni...]
Laughter and Stress Relief in Cancer Patients: A Pilot Study
[Evidence-based Complementary a...]
Quality of Life in Major Depressive Disorder Before/After Multiple Steps of Treatment and One-year Follow-up
[Acta psychiatrica Scandinavica...]
See all...
Links
PubMed
Recent Activity
ClearTurn Off
Laughter prescription
Laughter prescription
Canadian Family Physician. 2009 Oct; 55(10)965
See more...
Review Multiple comparisons: philosophies and illustrations.
[Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2000]
Humor and laughter may influence health. I. History and background.
[Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2006]
Review Humor, laughter, and physical health: methodological issues and research findings.
[Psychol Bull. 2001]
Review The purpose and function of humour in health, health care and nursing: a narrative review.
[J Adv Nurs. 2008]
Use of humor to reduce stress and pain and enhance healing in the dental setting.
[J N J Dent Assoc. 2007]
Effect of laughter on salivary endocrinological stress marker chromogranin A.
[Biomed Res. 2007]
Humor and Laughter May Influence Health: III. Laughter and Health Outcomes.
[Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2008]
The effect of mirthful laughter on stress and natural killer cell activity.
[Altern Ther Health Med. 2003]
Use of complementary therapies in a rural cancer population.
[Oncol Nurs Forum. 1999]
Frequency of use of complementary and alternative medicine in women with breast cancer.
[Oncol Nurs Forum. 2002]
Therapeutic efficacy of laughter in medicine.
[Cancer Invest. 2002]
Humor and healing: therapeutic effects in geriatrics.
[Gerontion. 1986]
See more ...
Humor and Laughter May Influence Health: III. Laughter and Health Outcomes.
[Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2008]
Review The role of laughter in traditional medicine and its relevance to the clinical setting: healing with ha!
[Altern Ther Health Med. 2003]
Impact of cinematic viewing on endothelial function.
[Heart. 2006]
Review Does counseling by clinicians improve physical activity? A summary of the evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.
[Ann Intern Med. 2002]
How does physician advice influence patient behavior? Evidence for a priming effect.
[Arch Fam Med. 2000]
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