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Old 05-11-2009, 10:21 PM   #61
cleopatraxxx
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Originally Posted by wakeup2nwo View Post
Anyone with NEW information on the implementation of RFID chips NANO chips or VERI chips, Please keep this Thread updated... Its our Future of control unless we learn and teach others the endgame to RFID technology.
Thanks!
THANK YOU wakeup2nwo for all the effort and brilliant useful info you have brought to us so far

SIncerely
Cleo

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Old 05-11-2009, 10:25 PM   #62
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Originally Posted by cleopatraxxx View Post
THANK YOU wakeup2nwo for all the effort and brilliant useful info you have brought to us so far

SIncerely
Cleo

:-)
not a problem cleo, im glad some people are interested!
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Old 05-11-2009, 10:36 PM   #63
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yea ive seen them in keys and i think they use them for the immobiliser on you ignition... i never thought of them as a tracking device, it was years ago when i was quite asleep, but your right , they look just like the rfid chip...
because they receive and transmit radio frequency to activate the other side?

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Old 05-11-2009, 10:38 PM   #64
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Originally Posted by rollotomaz1 View Post
If you open your mind and think of a way to hide one of these things, no matter how obsurd you think it is, the powers at large and their think tanks will have already done so, and by mentioning ways on this forum they will probably use your own ideas against you, no paranioa needed, they are everywhere already.
that thought occurs to me all the time, that is why i do not mention my ideas here. i am investigating ;-)
i wil create the solution. i know it.

stuff them and their total control
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Old 05-11-2009, 10:52 PM   #65
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because they receive and transmit radio frequency to activate the other side?
yea without the key that has the chip you can't start your car, there are ways to bypass the immobilizer though, i had to do it to a van i had because the key broke..
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Old 07-11-2009, 12:33 AM   #66
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Rumor Has It: 8GB 3GS, RFID-Capable iPhones on the Way?
By Darrell Etherington



Watch the VIDEO HERE.... http://www.pocket-lint.com/news/2933...g-rfid-iphones

iPhone3GS-2What better way to end the week than with two fresh, shiny new iPhone rumors to chew on? According to various reports, the iPhone 3GS could get an 8GB model just in time for the holidays, and Apple is said to be testing iPhones that support radio-frequency identification (RFID), a tech that allows devices to sense nearby embedded chips without coming in actual contact with them.

While the timing of both rumors happens to be concurrent, please note that it is very unlikely that if Apple were to release an 8GB iPhone 3GS in time for the holiday season, it would use the new RFID tech. It’s more likely that the RFID integration will come to fruition in later models of the iPhone.
$99 8GB 3GS

Rumors of the smaller capacity 3GS come via Boy Genius Report, which has proved fairly reliable in the past when it comes to predicting product launches by Apple. They claim to have heard news of the 8GB model from two separate sources at AT&T:

Definitely not confirmed, but rather interesting nonetheless. We’ve heard now from two sources that AT&T, and we guess Apple, are contemplating launching an 8GB iPhone 3GS at the $99 price point before Christmas. One source said this was AT&T’s way of combating the Droid madness.

It should be noted that BGR specifically points out that they haven’t heard any of this from Apple or any of its personnel, which could mean that AT&T is pitching the idea but doesn’t necessarily confirm that Apple is receptive. Still, a 3GS at the magical $99 sweet-spot would definitely take some of the wind out of Droid’s sails.

Of course, there is the fact that Phil Schiller said the Apple holiday lineup is set. That should mean no new products, right? Or it could mean that the 8GB 3GS was already on the roster and that it just hasn’t been announced yet. Still, if it is coming in time for Christmas, Apple is already missing out on some prime holiday buying time. We’ll definitely see it before Black Friday if we’re going to see it at all.
RFID

Apple is looking into integrating RFID swipe support into new iPhone prototypes, AppleInsider reports. iPhones boasting RFID capabilities could allow for things like making swipe payments, proximity alerts, and getting data from swiping RFID-embedded objects or even animals.

RFID tech is ideal for this sort of thing because it requires little power, since the data transferred is often small in size, usually only a number or a URL. There’s also the cost benefits of the tech, and the fact that they’re already in wide use. According to AppleInsider:

The cost of RFID chips is now down to just a few cents each in quantity, making it possible to apply them to a wide variety of uses. Shipping companies and retailers already use RFIDs to track packages much like barcodes; libraries use them to track books, farmers use them to identify animals in herds, and the army, theme parks and schools attach RFIDs to people.

The site also speculates that Apple could then leverage its existing iTunes accounts, broadening it to make it a method for paying for anything via your iPhone, so long as the vendor you’re dealing with is equipped to accept RFID payments. Such payment systems using cell phones have already been used widely in parts of Asia and Europe.

If Apple gets in early on widespread RFID adoption here in North America, it could see the kind of industrial and business success it’s been missing thus far. It might become as common to see an iPhone-based device on the loading dock as it is to see one in a Starbucks.

http://www.salon.com/tech/giga_om/ma...way/index.html
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Old 07-11-2009, 04:49 PM   #67
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Default RFID coming to iPhones?

by Sang Tang (RSS feed) on Nov 6th, 2009
http://www.tuaw.com/category/iphone/


Photo courtesy of flickr: Thijs Jacobs Back in April 2009, TUAW's Dave Caolo posted a video showing off the potential (and some of the potential annoyances as well) and possibilities of an RFID-enabled iPhone world via an iPhone RFID prototype by Near Field. And, according to a Near Field Communications blog posting, Apple is said to have equipped prototypes of the next-generation iPhone with RFID readers.

How awesome would it be if, instead of using my Mobil Speedpass, I could turn to my iPhone and swipe that against the gas pumping station to pay for gas? And, because there may eventually be "an app for that," I may also be able to view my current balance and fuel economy statistics. Or, instead of needing to put a FasTrak transponder atop my windshield (which is annoying), I could simply put my iPhone on the dashboard as I cross the toll road. I could then view my balance, as well as fill up my credits on the fly. These are just some examples of RFID applications in use today.
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Old 07-11-2009, 10:45 PM   #68
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Ex-IBM Employee reveals TV Abandoned Analog Band to Make Room for RFID Chips
Posted by sakerfa on July 12, 2009
According to a former 31-year IBM employee, the highly-publicized, mandatory switch from analog to digital television is mainly being done to free up analog frequencies and make room for scanners used to read implantable RFID microchips and track people and products throughout the world.
So while the American people, especially those in Texas and other busy border states, have been inundated lately with news reports advising them to hurry and get their expensive passports, “enhanced driver’s licenses,” passport cards and other “chipped” or otherwise trackable identification devices that they are being forced to own, this digital television/RFID connection has been hidden, according to Patrick Redmond.
Redmond, a Canadian, held a variety of jobs at IBM before retiring, including working in the company’s Toronto lab from 1992 to 2007, then in sales support. He has given talks, written a book and produced a DVD on the aggressive, growing use of passive, semi-passive and active RFID chips (Radio Frequency Identification Devices) implanted in new clothing, in items such as Gillette Fusion blades, and in countless other products that become one’s personal belongings. These RFID chips, many of which are as small, or smaller, than the tip of a sharp pencil, also are embedded in all new U.S. passports, some medical cards, a growing number of credit and debit cards and so on. More than two billion of them were sold in 2007.
Whether active, semi-passive or passive, these “transponder chips,” as they’re sometimes called, can be accessed or activated with “readers” that can pick up the unique signal given off by each chip and glean information from it on the identity and whereabouts of the product or person, depending on design and circumstances, as Redmond explained in a little-publicized lecture in Canada last year. AFP just obtained a DVD of his talk.
Noted “Spychips” expert, author and radio host Katherine Albrecht told AMERICAN FREE PRESS that while she’s not totally sure whether there is a rock-solid RFID-DTV link, “The purpose of the switch [to digital] was to free up bandwidth. It’s a pretty wide band, so freeing that up creates a huge swath of frequencies.”
As is generally known, the active chips have an internal power source and antenna; these particular chips emit a constant signal. “This allows the tag to send signals back to the reader, so if I have a RFID chip on me and it has a battery, I can just send a signal to a reader wherever it is,” Redmond stated in the recent lecture, given to the Catholic patriot group known as the Pilgrims of Saint Michael, which also is known for advocating social credit, a dramatic monetary reform plan to end the practice of national governments bringing money into existence by borrowing it, with interest, from private central banks. The group’s publication The Michael Journal advocates having national governments create their own money interest-free. It also covers the RFID issue.
“The increased use of RFID chips is going to require the increased use of the UBF [UHF] spectrum,” Redmond said, hitting on his essential point that TV is going digital for a much different reason than the average person assumes, “They are going to stop using the [UHF] and VHF frequencies in 2009. Everything is going to go digital (in the U.S.). Canada is going to do the same thing.”
Explaining the unsettling crux of the matter, he continued: “The reason they are doing this is that the [UHF-VHF] analog frequencies are being used for the chips. They do not want to overload the chips with television signals, so the chips’ signals are going to be taking those [analog] frequencies. They plan to sell the frequencies to private companies and other groups who will use them to monitor the chips.”
Albrecht responded to that quote only by saying that it sounds plausible, since she knows some chips will indeed operate in the UHF-VHF ranges.
“Well over a million pets have been chipped,” Redmond said, adding that all 31,000 police officers in London have in some manner been chipped as well, much to the consternation of some who want that morning donut without being tracked. London also can link a RFID chip in a public transportation pass with the customer’s name. “Where is John Smith? Oh, he is on subway car 32,” Redmond said.
He added that chips for following automobile drivers – while the concept is being fought by several states in the U.S. which do not want nationalized, trackable driver’s licenses (Real ID ) – is apparently a slam dunk in Canada, where license plates have quietly been chipped. Such identification tags can contain work history, education, religion, ethnicity, reproductive history and much more.
Farm animals are increasingly being chipped; furthermore, “Some 800 hospitals in the U.S. are now chipping their patients; you can turn it down, but it’s available,” he said, adding: “Four hospitals in Puerto Rico have put them in the arms of Alzheimer’s patients, and it only costs about $200 per person.”
VeriChip, a major chip maker (the devices sometimes also are called Spychips) describes its product on its website: “About twice the length of a grain of rice, the device is typically implanted above the triceps area of an individual’s right arm. Once scanned at the proper frequency, the VeriChip responds with a unique 16 digit number which could be then linked with information about the user held on a database for identity verification, medical records access and other uses. The insertion procedure is performed under local anesthetic in a physician’s office and once inserted, is invisible to the naked eye. As an implanted device used for identification by a third party, it has generated controversy and debate.”
The circles will keep widening, Redmond predicts. Chipping children “to be able to protect them,” Redmond said, “is being promoted in the media.” After that, he believes it will come to: chip the military, chip welfare cheats, chip criminals, chip workers who are goofing off, chip pensioners – and then chip everyone else under whatever rationale is cited by government and highly-protected corporations that stand to make billions of dollars from this technology. Meanwhile, the concept is marketed by a corporate media that, far from being a watchdog of the surveillance state, is part of it, much like the media give free publicity to human vaccination programs without critical analysis on possible dangers and side effects of the vaccines.
“That’s the first time I have heard of it,” a Federal Communications Commission official claimed, when AFP asked him about the RFID-DTV issue on June 2. Preferring anonymity, he added: “I am not at all aware of that being a cause (of going to DTV).”
“Nigel Gilbert of the Royal Academy of Engineering said that by 2011 you should be able to go on Google and find out where someone is at anytime from chips on clothing, in cars, in cellphones and inside many people themselves,” Redmond also said.
http://dprogram.net/2009/07/12/ex-ib...or-rfid-chips/
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Old 08-11-2009, 09:39 AM   #69
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Originally Posted by secret66mechanism View Post
Ex-IBM Employee reveals TV Abandoned Analog Band to Make Room for RFID Chips
Posted by sakerfa on July 12, 2009
According to a former 31-year IBM employee, the highly-publicized, mandatory switch from analog to digital television is mainly being done to free up analog frequencies and make room for scanners used to read implantable RFID microchips and track people and products throughout the world.

So while the American people, especially those in Texas and other busy border states, have been inundated lately with news reports advising them to hurry and get their expensive passports, “enhanced driver’s licenses,” passport cards and other “chipped” or otherwise trackable identification devices that they are being forced to own, this digital television/RFID connection has been hidden, according to Patrick Redmond.
Redmond, a Canadian, held a variety of jobs at IBM before retiring, including working in the company’s Toronto lab from 1992 to 2007, then in sales support. He has given talks, written a book and produced a DVD on the aggressive, growing use of passive, semi-passive and active RFID chips (Radio Frequency Identification Devices) implanted in new clothing, in items such as Gillette Fusion blades, and in countless other products that become one’s personal belongings. These RFID chips, many of which are as small, or smaller, than the tip of a sharp pencil, also are embedded in all new U.S. passports, some medical cards, a growing number of credit and debit cards and so on. More than two billion of them were sold in 2007.
Whether active, semi-passive or passive, these “transponder chips,” as they’re sometimes called, can be accessed or activated with “readers” that can pick up the unique signal given off by each chip and glean information from it on the identity and whereabouts of the product or person, depending on design and circumstances, as Redmond explained in a little-publicized lecture in Canada last year. AFP just obtained a DVD of his talk.
Noted “Spychips” expert, author and radio host Katherine Albrecht told AMERICAN FREE PRESS that while she’s not totally sure whether there is a rock-solid RFID-DTV link, “The purpose of the switch [to digital] was to free up bandwidth. It’s a pretty wide band, so freeing that up creates a huge swath of frequencies.”
As is generally known, the active chips have an internal power source and antenna; these particular chips emit a constant signal. “This allows the tag to send signals back to the reader, so if I have a RFID chip on me and it has a battery, I can just send a signal to a reader wherever it is,” Redmond stated in the recent lecture, given to the Catholic patriot group known as the Pilgrims of Saint Michael, which also is known for advocating social credit, a dramatic monetary reform plan to end the practice of national governments bringing money into existence by borrowing it, with interest, from private central banks. The group’s publication The Michael Journal advocates having national governments create their own money interest-free. It also covers the RFID issue.
“The increased use of RFID chips is going to require the increased use of the UBF [UHF] spectrum,” Redmond said, hitting on his essential point that TV is going digital for a much different reason than the average person assumes, “They are going to stop using the [UHF] and VHF frequencies in 2009. Everything is going to go digital (in the U.S.). Canada is going to do the same thing.”
Explaining the unsettling crux of the matter, he continued: “The reason they are doing this is that the [UHF-VHF] analog frequencies are being used for the chips. They do not want to overload the chips with television signals, so the chips’ signals are going to be taking those [analog] frequencies. They plan to sell the frequencies to private companies and other groups who will use them to monitor the chips.”
Albrecht responded to that quote only by saying that it sounds plausible, since she knows some chips will indeed operate in the UHF-VHF ranges.
“Well over a million pets have been chipped,” Redmond said, adding that all 31,000 police officers in London have in some manner been chipped as well, much to the consternation of some who want that morning donut without being tracked. London also can link a RFID chip in a public transportation pass with the customer’s name. “Where is John Smith? Oh, he is on subway car 32,” Redmond said.
He added that chips for following automobile drivers – while the concept is being fought by several states in the U.S. which do not want nationalized, trackable driver’s licenses (Real ID ) – is apparently a slam dunk in Canada, where license plates have quietly been chipped. Such identification tags can contain work history, education, religion, ethnicity, reproductive history and much more.
Farm animals are increasingly being chipped; furthermore, “Some 800 hospitals in the U.S. are now chipping their patients; you can turn it down, but it’s available,” he said, adding: “Four hospitals in Puerto Rico have put them in the arms of Alzheimer’s patients, and it only costs about $200 per person.”
VeriChip, a major chip maker (the devices sometimes also are called Spychips) describes its product on its website: “About twice the length of a grain of rice, the device is typically implanted above the triceps area of an individual’s right arm. Once scanned at the proper frequency, the VeriChip responds with a unique 16 digit number which could be then linked with information about the user held on a database for identity verification, medical records access and other uses. The insertion procedure is performed under local anesthetic in a physician’s office and once inserted, is invisible to the naked eye. As an implanted device used for identification by a third party, it has generated controversy and debate.”
The circles will keep widening, Redmond predicts. Chipping children “to be able to protect them,” Redmond said, “is being promoted in the media.” After that, he believes it will come to: chip the military, chip welfare cheats, chip criminals, chip workers who are goofing off, chip pensioners – and then chip everyone else under whatever rationale is cited by government and highly-protected corporations that stand to make billions of dollars from this technology. Meanwhile, the concept is marketed by a corporate media that, far from being a watchdog of the surveillance state, is part of it, much like the media give free publicity to human vaccination programs without critical analysis on possible dangers and side effects of the vaccines.
“That’s the first time I have heard of it,” a Federal Communications Commission official claimed, when AFP asked him about the RFID-DTV issue on June 2. Preferring anonymity, he added: “I am not at all aware of that being a cause (of going to DTV).”
“Nigel Gilbert of the Royal Academy of Engineering said that by 2011 you should be able to go on Google and find out where someone is at anytime from chips on clothing, in cars, in cellphones and inside many people themselves,” Redmond also said.
http://dprogram.net/2009/07/12/ex-ib...or-rfid-chips/
thanks for the info, most of us thought the switch over was to do with rfid but know we know for sure...
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Last edited by wakeup2nwo; 08-11-2009 at 09:55 AM.
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Old 08-11-2009, 05:08 PM   #70
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Default ID chip means your kids will have nowhere to hide

Imagine if the Nazis had the ID chip technology - no Ann Frank diaries!

We can look after and keep our kids safe, but when we are gone or taken away, where can our kids hide if they are tagged? People in this forum worry about posting photos of their children but getting them electronically tagged is the worst of all nightmares. We have tales of prisoners of war escaping Nazi prison camps, anti-war protestors escaping the draft and Tibetans escaping the oppressive Chinese regime, but how would this be possible if everyone was hooked up to a global satellite tracking system?
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Old 09-11-2009, 10:54 AM   #71
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Forgetful patients to be fitted with microchips to remind them to take their pills



By Ryan Kisiel
Last updated at 11:33 AM on 22nd September 2009

Patients will be fitted with a microchip in their shoulder to remind them to take their medicine, under a new scheme being developed by a drugs company.

Older people will be given pills containing a harmless microchip that sends a signal to the chip in the shoulder when the pill is taken.

But if the pill is not taken by the forgetful patient, the chip in the shoulder will then send a text to a carer or the patient to remind them.
pills

A microchip could let carers know if a forgetful patient has failed to take their medicine

Swiss pharmaceutical group Norvatis is developing the electronic pill that it hopes will reduce the number of patients who have to be supervised taking their medicine.

Joe Jiminez, head of pharmaceuticals at Novartis, said tests of the 'chip in the pill' to a shoulder receiver chip had been carried out on 20 patients.

The experiment with a drug that lowers blood pressure had increased the amount of times patients had taken their medicine on time from 30 per cent to 80 per cent in six months.

Drug companies are keen to improve 'compliance' rates among patients as most end up not taking their correct dosages because of unpleasant side effects or a failure to gain symptoms quickly.

Medical companies hope it will reduce the number of hospitalisations from patients whose conditions have deteriorated from not taking their drugs.

Mr Jiminez said: 'This industry is starting to explode.' He added that his company would have to work closely with medical watchdogs and doctors.

Rival drug company Pfizer recently developed an automated system to telephone patients to encourage them to take their medicine.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/ar...#ixzz0WMWdRDPl
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Old 09-11-2009, 12:09 PM   #72
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The PTb will try and usually suceed in getting their agenda across in so many small ways that in time so many groups will have acceeded that the rest of the population will look like they are the odd ones out. So comply.

I love this tip-toeing fascism/communism/slaveism.

Remember freedom is slavery.
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Old 09-11-2009, 03:09 PM   #73
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warwickshire county council to have new rfid system installed in their libarys.

i have this straight from the horses mouth as i was in their today getting some stuff out and one of the persons who works behind the desk says the new system is to be installed after christmas.

after trying to get out books like george orwell and denise wheatlys titles as mine have become worm fodder, the said person disclosed the system would be changing and many of the said titles that had gone missing off the shelves might crop up.
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Old 11-11-2009, 09:16 PM   #74
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November 10, 2009
Technology

HK to become RFID trendsetter

http://www.news.gov.hk/en/category/i...110en06002.htm

Commissioner for Innovation & Technology Janet Wong says the Government is working to make Hong Kong a Radio Frequency Identification centre and a RFID trendsetter in the Asia Pacific Region.



Speaking at the Hong Kong RFID Awards 2009 presentation ceremony today Miss Wong said the Government spares no effort in promoting the development of RFID technology, to facilitate its adoption in local industries, as well as to encourage the public to realise its importance.



"The establishment of the Hong Kong RFID Centre last year in the Hong Kong Science Park and the continuous funding support for RFID research projects are some examples [of RFID development]," she said.



However, all these efforts will not bear fruit without staunch support from industry and the community, she added.



On the introduction of the new U-21 Awards, she said they will enhance youngsters' awareness of the importance of technology development, facilitate experience sharing and knowledge transfer, and encourage more innovation.
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Old 11-11-2009, 09:21 PM   #75
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New RFID technology reduces shipping headaches

http://www.v3.co.uk/v3/news/2252893/...ogy-simplifies

New IBM technology could reduce inventory costs by up to 40 per cent

Cath Everett

V3.co.uk, 10 Nov 2009

IBM has released a new version of its InfoSphere Traceability Server, which includes Returnable Container Management functionality to enable customers to track the whereabouts of their containers using RFID tags.

The new offering has been designed to cut the costs and shipping delays associated with lost or misplaced returnable containers, said IBM. The containers are shipped by manufacturers to suppliers, who fill them and send them back.
Advertisement

The system is already used to track valuable items such as pharmaceuticals and medical implants, but was modified following work the vendor undertook with major car manufacturers to help them manage their automobile parts supply chain. It also includes analytics functionality from IBM’s Cognos acquisition.

IBM said that customers wanting to use the Returnable Container Management module need to affix sensors, which include RFID tags, to their reusable containers. Both standing and mobile devices are then employed to read the tags and capture data such as place, time of manufacture and serial number.

An online system subsequently enables manufacturers and supply chain partners to determine where the container is at any given point in time, and will alert them if it is sent to the wrong location.

IBM claimed that users can expect to improve container turnaround time by as much as 20 per cent, while container loss is likely to fall by between five and 15 per cent. Container inventory, which in the case of many automotive OEMs is in excess of $100 million (£59m), should drop by about 10 per cent.
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Old 11-11-2009, 09:33 PM   #76
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RFID on the next iPhone? Why?

An RFID-equipped iPhone could open doors – literally – and advance the technology.

http://features.csmonitor.com/innova...xt-iphone-why/



By Andrew Heining | 11.10.09

Reports are coming in that Apple (in addition to rolling out a smaller capacity Droid-fighter) has plans to build RFID capabilities into its next iPhone. Why would Steve Jobs and the folks in Cupertino do that?

Most people think of RFID (not always viewed as the most secure of systems) as the cards and scanners used for corporate building access. But recent advances in “near-field communication” (NFC) have broadened the spectrum of RFID’s uses.

Think of NFC as enhanced RFID. With RFID, there is a distinct card and reader, and the card can be read when it comes into proximity with the reader. NFC does the same thing, but combines the card and reader functions, enabling two-way communication.

What does Apple want with NFC?

Einar Rosenberg, who runs the Near Field Communications LinkedIn group, shared this:

A highly reliable source has informed me that Apple has built some prototypes of the next gen iPhone with an RFID reader built in and they have seen it in action. So its not full NFC but its a start for real service discovery and I’m told that the reaction was very positive that we can expect this in the next gen iPhone.

So we could soon be ditching those RFID cards and using our iPhones to open doors, ride the subway, or rent Zipcars. Big whoop, right? Well, yes, but there’s more.

Bill Ray, writing for the Register, points out that Nokia owns many of the patents surrounding NFC technology, and has been pushing it without success for some time. It’s a chicken and egg problem: Without a network of applications, there’s no reason for device makers to (pay to) adopt the tech. And without a range of uses, there’s no reason for users to demand that device makers include it.

An Apple adoption of the tech, with its army of App Store-loving users, could give NFC a real kickstart, bringing innovation to the field.

What might that mean? How ’bout an app from Boston’s MBTA that not only displays location-aware maps, but lets riders do away with cards and payments? Or one that, along the lines of the barcode scanning apps out now, could read embedded RFID tags on products and instantly display a place to buy them for cheaper.

More mundanely, NFC could smooth Bluetooth pairings – instead of the tedious search, wait, pair, wait, authorize dance that must currently happen, two NFC-equipped devices could sense each others’ presence, display an approval screen, and be done with it.

The truth is, many of NFC’s possible uses haven’t been conceived of yet – and won’t be, until they get a little help from a big endorser like Apple.
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Old 11-11-2009, 10:27 PM   #77
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VeriChip Corporation Completes Acquisition of Steel Vault Corporation

http://www.tmcnet.com/usubmit/2009/11/10/4473336.htm

DELRAY BEACH, Fla. --(Business Wire)-- VeriChip Corporation (NASDAQ:CHIP) ("VeriChip"), a provider of radio frequency identification (RFID) systems for healthcare and patient-related needs, and Steel Vault Corporation (OTCBB:SVUL) ("Steel Vault"), a premier provider of identity security products and services, announced today that VeriChip has completed its acquisition of Steel Vault to provide unique health and security identification tools to protect consumers and businesses. In conjunction with the merger, VeriChip has changed its name to PositiveID ("PositiveID" or the "Company").

PositiveID represents the convergence of a pioneer in personal health records and the first and only FDA-cleared implantable microchip for patient identification, VeriChip, with a leader in the identity security space, Steel Vault, focused on access and security of consumers' critical data.

PositiveID will initially operate primarily in two areas: HealthID and ID Security. HealthID will focus on bringing innovative health solutions to consumers and businesses based on the Company's intellectual property, specifically a rapid virus detection system for the H1N1 virus and other forms of pandemic viruses, and an in vivo glucose-sensing RFID microchip, both of which are currently under development with partner RECEPTORS LLC. The Company will also offer its Health Link personal health record to help consumers manage their health records online. Through its ID Security segment, the Company will offer identity theft protection and related services including credit monitoring and reporting through its NationalCreditReport.com website.

Under terms of the agreement and plan of reorganization, Steel Vault stockholders will receive 0.5 shares of VeriChip common stock for every share of Steel Vault common stock held. The outstanding stock options and warrants of Steel Vault will also be converted at the same ratio. No fractional shares of VeriChip common stock will be issued in connection with the proposed merger. Instead, VeriChip will make a cash payment to each Steel Vault stockholder who would otherwise receive a fractional share. This merger is a stock-for-stock transaction, and is expected to be a tax free exchange.

Commenting on the transaction, Scott R. Silverman, Chairman and CEO of PositiveID, stated, "In joining these two companies, we believe we are better positioned to accelerate the development of our exciting diagnostic and sensor applications such as glucose-sensing, as well as our rapid virus detection system for the H1N1 virus and other pandemic viruses. By moving beyond the original patient identification application of our implantable RFID microchip technology, we believe that we will be able to get high-value products to market faster with a more efficient use of capital." Silverman continued, "From a financial standpoint, we believe the merger has made us stronger by eliminating the duplicative costs of running two public companies. Furthermore, we are fully-funded to develop the glucose-sensing microchip and the rapid virus detection system and have no debt." About PositiveID Corporation PositiveID Corporation provides identification technologies and tools to protect consumers and businesses. PositiveID operates in two main divisions, its HealthID business and its ID Security business. For more information on PositiveID, please visit www.positiveidcorp.com.

Forward Looking Statements Statements about the Company's future expectations, including its ability to provide unique health and security identification tools to protect consumers and businesses, its ability to successfully develop and market an in vivo glucose-sensing RFID microchip and a rapid virus detection system for the H1N1 virus and other pandemic viruses, its ability to offer its Health Link personal health record to help consumers manage their records online and identity theft protection through its NationalCreditReport.com website, the belief that the Company is better positioned to accelerate the development of its diagnostic and sensor applications such as glucose-sensing, the belief that the Company will be able to get high-value products to market faster with a more efficient use of capital, the belief that the merger and formation of the Company has made it stronger from a financial standpoint by eliminating duplicative costs, the belief that it is fully-funded to develop an in vivo glucose-sensing RFID microchip and rapid virus detection system for the H1N1 virus, and all other statements in this press release other than historical facts are "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and as that term is defined in the Private Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties and are subject to change at any time, and the Company's actual results could differ materially from expected results. These risks and uncertainties include the Company's ability to successfully develop and commercialize the Health Link personal health record, in vivo glucose-sensing microchip and rapid virus detection system (its "Technologies"), its ability to fund the continued development of its Technologies, the Company's and RECEPTORS' ability to develop its Technologies, the validity, scope and enforceability of the Company's patents and those related to its Technologies, the protection afforded by the Company's patents and those related to its Technologies, government regulations relating to its Technologies, the Company's ability to fund the continued development of its Technologies, the timing and success of submission, acceptance and approval of required regulatory filings, the risk that expected synergies and benefits of the merger will not be realized, uncertainty as to its working capital requirements over the next 12 to 24 months, its ability to successfully integrate the businesses of acquired companies, competitive and economic influences, as well as certain other risks. Additional information about these and other factors that could affect the Company's business is set forth in the Company's various filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including those set forth in the Company's 10-K filed on February 12, 2009, under the caption "Risk Factors." The Company undertakes no obligation to update or release any revisions to these forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date of this statement or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events, except as required by law.

this is very bad news
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Old 11-11-2009, 10:37 PM   #78
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http://news.stv.tv/scotland/east-cen...-in-edinburgh/

Edinburgh

New research centre aims to examine the long-term safety of tiny particles present in everything from razor blades to sun screen.


WATCH THE SHOCKING VIDEO HERE: http://video.stv.tv/bc/stv-news-e2-20091111-nano/




Tiny man-made particles which are now used in the production of a huge range of everyday products are going under the microscope in Edinburgh.

A specialist research lab has opened its doors at Edinburgh Napier University, focussing on nanotechnology.

Nanoparticles are a thousand times smaller than the width of a human hair, however, they are becoming an increasingly important part of our lives.

They are used to make sunscreen more transparent on the skin and are used to fight bacteria on the coating on some razor blades.

However, scientists say very little is known about the long-term impact they could have on our health.

Critics worry that their use in skincare could lead to products permeating skin's protective layer or expose other cells to toxins.

The new research centre was opened by Scotland's Chief Scientific Advisor, Professor Anne Glover. She said: "Given the widespread use of nanomaterials in variety of everyday products, it is essential for us to fully understand them and their potential impacts.

"This centre is one of the first in the UK to bring together nano-science research across human, environment, reproductive health and microbiology to ensure the safe and sustainable ongoing use of nanotechnology."

Director of the Centre for Nano Safety, Vicki Stone, said: "Nanomaterials are used in a diverse range of products from medicines and water purifiers to make-up, food, paints, clothing and electronics. It is therefore essential that we fully understand their long term impact.

"We are dedicated to understanding the ongoing health and environmental affects of their use and then helping shape future policy for their development. The launch of this new centre is a huge step forward in this important area of research."

Last updated: 11 November 2009, 19:53
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Last edited by wakeup2nwo; 11-11-2009 at 10:39 PM.
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Old 11-11-2009, 11:08 PM   #79
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Originally Posted by wakeup2nwo View Post
Forgetful patients to be fitted with microchips to remind them to take their pills



By Ryan Kisiel
Last updated at 11:33 AM on 22nd September 2009

Patients will be fitted with a microchip in their shoulder to remind them to take their medicine, under a new scheme being developed by a drugs company.

Older people will be given pills containing a harmless microchip that sends a signal to the chip in the shoulder when the pill is taken.

But if the pill is not taken by the forgetful patient, the chip in the shoulder will then send a text to a carer or the patient to remind them.
pills

A microchip could let carers know if a forgetful patient has failed to take their medicine

Swiss pharmaceutical group Norvatis is developing the electronic pill that it hopes will reduce the number of patients who have to be supervised taking their medicine.

Joe Jiminez, head of pharmaceuticals at Novartis, said tests of the 'chip in the pill' to a shoulder receiver chip had been carried out on 20 patients.

The experiment with a drug that lowers blood pressure had increased the amount of times patients had taken their medicine on time from 30 per cent to 80 per cent in six months.

Drug companies are keen to improve 'compliance' rates among patients as most end up not taking their correct dosages because of unpleasant side effects or a failure to gain symptoms quickly.

Medical companies hope it will reduce the number of hospitalisations from patients whose conditions have deteriorated from not taking their drugs.

Mr Jiminez said: 'This industry is starting to explode.' He added that his company would have to work closely with medical watchdogs and doctors.

Rival drug company Pfizer recently developed an automated system to telephone patients to encourage them to take their medicine.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/ar...#ixzz0WMWdRDPl
What's that then a small electric shock as a reminder or a large one to finish them off, or even an altering micro wave so they forget altogether and die from not taking it, beggers belief that a persons own family cannot take care of the person who gave them life in the first place, so they can live the rest of their lives in dignity, instead of being locked up in an old peoples home.

If we cannot make it work for everybody inour family then we are all doing something wrong, we have a room ready and waiting for both of them when they are ready.
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Old 12-11-2009, 12:20 AM   #80
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wakeup2nwo View Post
Forgetful patients to be fitted with microchips to remind them to take their pills



By Ryan Kisiel
Last updated at 11:33 AM on 22nd September 2009

Patients will be fitted with a microchip in their shoulder to remind them to take their medicine, under a new scheme being developed by a drugs company.

Older people will be given pills containing a harmless microchip that sends a signal to the chip in the shoulder when the pill is taken.

But if the pill is not taken by the forgetful patient, the chip in the shoulder will then send a text to a carer or the patient to remind them.
pills

A microchip could let carers know if a forgetful patient has failed to take their medicine

Swiss pharmaceutical group Norvatis is developing the electronic pill that it hopes will reduce the number of patients who have to be supervised taking their medicine.

Joe Jiminez, head of pharmaceuticals at Novartis, said tests of the 'chip in the pill' to a shoulder receiver chip had been carried out on 20 patients.

The experiment with a drug that lowers blood pressure had increased the amount of times patients had taken their medicine on time from 30 per cent to 80 per cent in six months.

Drug companies are keen to improve 'compliance' rates among patients as most end up not taking their correct dosages because of unpleasant side effects or a failure to gain symptoms quickly.

Medical companies hope it will reduce the number of hospitalisations from patients whose conditions have deteriorated from not taking their drugs.

Mr Jiminez said: 'This industry is starting to explode.' He added that his company would have to work closely with medical watchdogs and doctors.

Rival drug company Pfizer recently developed an automated system to telephone patients to encourage them to take their medicine.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/ar...#ixzz0WMWdRDPl
"Drug companies are keen to improve 'compliance' rates among patients as most end up not taking their correct dosages because of unpleasant side effects or a failure to gain symptoms quickly."= forced to be poisoned!
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