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Old 28-01-2013, 06:51 PM   #1
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Default Believe Your Own Eyes

Believe Your Own Eyes
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GDgyhIfTbkU
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Old 28-01-2013, 07:06 PM   #2
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Default The sphere



The release of something inside the earth



The new world to come.
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Old 28-01-2013, 07:16 PM   #3
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I get it now.This is the same symbol jewish news 1 uses as a wallpaper background between comercials once and awhile on http://jn1.tv/.
The only difference is a woman looks at sphere waiting for the release.

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Old 28-01-2013, 07:20 PM   #4
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Old 28-01-2013, 07:25 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 10thlight View Post
Look at the sphere at 25:18 in the video above
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Old 28-01-2013, 07:31 PM   #6
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The Sphere
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For other uses, see Sphere (disambiguation).
The Sphere German: Große Kugelkaryatide (Great Spherical Caryatid)
The Sphere at the Austin J. Tobin Plaza before the September 11 Attacks.
Artist Fritz Koenig
Year 1971
Type Bronze
Dimensions 762 cm (300 in)
Location Austin J. Tobin Plaza (original location, pictured above), Battery Park (current installation), New York City

Coordinates: 40°42′15″N 74°0′55″W
Owner Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ)

The Sphere is a large metallic sculpture by German sculptor Fritz Koenig, displayed in Battery Park, New York City, that once stood in the middle of Austin J. Tobin Plaza, the area between the World Trade Center towers in Manhattan. After being recovered from the rubble of the Twin Towers after the September 11 attacks in 2001, the artwork faced an uncertain fate, and it was dismantled into its components. Although it remained structurally intact, it had been visibly damaged by debris from the airliners that were crashed into the buildings and from the collapsing skyscrapers themselves.

Six months after the attacks, following a documentary film about the sculpture, it was relocated to Battery Park on a temporary basis—without any repairs—and formally rededicated with an eternal flame as a memorial to the victims of 9/11. It has become a major tourist attraction, due partly to the fact that it survived the attacks with only dents and holes.
Contents

1 Description
2 Acquisition
3 Location history
3.1 Current location
4 Gallery
5 See also
6 References
7 External links

Description

The Sphere is 25 feet high and cast in 52 bronze segments. Koenig considered it his "biggest child". It was put together in Bremen, Germany and shipped as a whole to Lower Manhattan.[1] The artwork was meant to symbolize world peace through world trade, and was placed at the center of a ring of fountains and other decorative touches designed by trade center architect Minoru Yamasaki to mimic the Grand Mosque of Mecca, Masjid al-Haram, in which The Sphere stood at the place of the Kaaba.[2] It was set to rotate once every 24 hours, and its base became a popular lunch spot for workers in the trade center on days with good weather.
Acquisition

The piece was commissioned by the owner of the World Trade Center, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ), in 1966. The Authority's original choice had been Henry Moore, but Koenig was chosen after architect Minoru Yamasaki saw some of Koenig's work at the Staempfli Gallery in Manhattan. Koenig started work in 1967 in his barn in Bavaria, while the WTC was in the planning stages, and finished it four years later in time for the opening of the towers. Officially titled Große Kugelkaryatide (Great Spherical Caryatid) by the artist, New Yorkers soon nicknamed it The Sphere.[1]
Location history
The Sphere after 9/11.

After the attacks on 11 September 2001, upon recovery from the rubble pile the sculpture was dismantled and sent to storage near John F. Kennedy International Airport. Its extraction had been widely covered in local news media in the New York metropolitan area. As it was a memorable feature of the Twin Towers site, there was much discussion about using it in a memorial, especially since it seemed to have come through the attacks relatively unscathed.[3]

German film director Percy Adlon, who had twice previously devoted films to Koenig, made Koenigs Kugel (Koenig's Sphere) at a time when the sculpture's fate was still uncertain. In the film, the artist and the director visit Ground Zero five weeks after the attacks as the former retells the story of its creation. At first, Koenig opposed reinstalling The Sphere, considering it "a beautiful corpse."[4]

The sculpture was eventually returned to Manhattan, and on 11 March 2002, six months to the day after the attacks, it was re-erected in Battery Park, near the Hope Garden, several blocks away from where it once stood. Koenig himself supervised the work; it took four engineers and 15 ironworkers to create a new base. Mayor Michael Bloomberg, his predecessor Rudolph Giuliani and other local officials spoke at a ceremony rededicating it as a memorial to the victims.

"It was a sculpture, now it's a monument," Koenig said, noting how the relatively fragile metal globe had mostly survived the cataclysm. "It now has a different beauty, one I could never imagine. It has its own life – different from the one I gave to it."

According to the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation spokeswoman Vickie Karp, the city is looking to relocate The Sphere by summer 2012 when construction will begin to restore the park’s lawn, requiring the sculpture to be moved. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ), which owns The Sphere, is considering placing the sculpture in Liberty Park, which will be located between the 90 West Street building and the World Trade Center Memorial site. Liberty Park won’t be constructed until at least 2013, so a location is needed to place The Sphere until Liberty Park is completed. As of February 2011, PANYNJ had not made an official final decision on where to place the sculpture once Battery Park construction commences, forcing the sculpture to move. Until Liberty Park opens, the Sphere may have to go into storage.[5][6]

An online petition created by 9/11 families demanding the return of The Sphere to the 9/11 Memorial has gained more than 7,123 signatures as of 23 July 2011.[7]

Officials from the 9/11 Memorial have stated that they do not want any 9/11 artifacts cluttering the 8-acre memorial plaza. There are no plans to place The Sphere on the 9/11 Memorial site. Liberty Park, which is south of the 9/11 Memorial, is not part of or on the site of the 9/11 Memorial.[5][6]

On June 28, 2012, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey expressed support for the effort to move The Sphere to the plaza of the National September 11 Memorial & Museum.[8] After a public comment by Michael Burke during a meeting of the Board of Commissioners, Executive Director Patrick J. Foye stated:

The point that Mr. Burke made resonates with many people in New York and New Jersey and many people here at the Port Authority, especially given the fact that 84 members of the Port Authority family were killed on 9/11. This is an artifact that survived and was affected by the horrors of 9/11, and placing it on the memorial plaza, we think, is entirely appropriate.

— Patrick J. Foye, Port Authority head supports making WTC sphere that survived 9/11 attacks part of memorial, The Washington Post

Current location
The Sphere in Battery Park, July 2007.

The Sphere is located on Battery Park, near the Hope Garden and stands as a 9/11 memorial.

A plaque alongside The Sphere reads as follows:

"For three decades, this sculpture stood in the plaza of the World Trade Center. Entitled "The Sphere", it was conceived by artist Fritz Koenig as a symbol of world peace. It was damaged during the tragic events of 11 September 2001, but endures as an icon of hope and the indestructible spirit of this country. The Sphere was placed here on 11 March 2002 as a temporary memorial to all who lost their lives in the terrorist attacks at the World Trade Center."


"This eternal flame was ignited on 11 September 2002 in honor of all those that were lost. Their spirit and sacrifice will never be forgotten."[9]


Description

The Sphere is 25 feet high and cast in 52 bronze segments. Koenig considered it his "biggest child". It was put together in Bremen, Germany and shipped as a whole to Lower Manhattan.[1] The artwork was meant to symbolize world peace through world trade, and was placed at the center of a ring of fountains and other decorative touches designed by trade center architect Minoru Yamasaki to mimic the Grand Mosque of Mecca, Masjid al-Haram, in which The Sphere stood at the place of the Kaaba.[2] It was set to rotate once every 24 hours, and its base became a popular lunch spot for workers in the trade center on days with good weather.


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Old 28-01-2013, 07:39 PM   #7
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Current location
The Sphere in Battery Park, July 2007.

The Sphere is located on Battery Park, near the Hope Garden and stands as a 9/11 memorial.

A plaque alongside The Sphere reads as follows:

"For three decades, this sculpture stood in the plaza of the World Trade Center. Entitled "The Sphere", it was conceived by artist Fritz Koenig as a symbol of world peace. It was damaged during the tragic events of 11 September 2001, but endures as an icon of hope and the indestructible spirit of this country. The Sphere was placed here on 11 March 2002 as a temporary memorial to all who lost their lives in the terrorist attacks at the World Trade Center."


"This eternal flame was ignited on 11 September 2002 in honor of all those that were lost. Their spirit and sacrifice will never be forgotten."[9]



On June 28, 2012, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey expressed support for the effort to move The Sphere to the plaza of the National September 11 Memorial & Museum.[
National September 11 Memorial & Museum
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Old 28-01-2013, 07:49 PM   #8
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Default Tefillin


Tefillin
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Tefillin (Askhenazic: pron.: /ˈtfɪlɨn/; Israeli Hebrew: [tfiˈlin], תפילין) also called phylacteries (/fɪˈlæktəriːz/ from Ancient Greek phylacterion, form of phylássein, φυλάσσειν meaning "to guard, protect") are a set of small black leather boxes containing scrolls of parchment inscribed with verses from the Torah, which are worn by observant Jews during weekday morning prayers. Although "tefillin" is technically the plural form (the singular being "tefillah"), it is loosely used as a singular as well.[1] The hand-tefillin, or shel yad, is placed on the upper arm, and the strap wrapped around the arm, hand and fingers; while the head-tefillin, or shel rosh, is placed above the forehead. The Torah commands that they should be worn to serve as a "sign" and "remembrance" that God brought the children of Israel out of Egypt.

The scriptural texts for tefillin are obscure in literal meaning. For example, the verse in Deut. 11:18 does not designate what specifically to "bind upon your arm," and the definition of totafot is not obvious. It is the Talmud, the authoritative oral tradition for Rabbinic Judaism, which explains what are to be bound to the body and the form of tefillin.[2]
Contents

1 Biblical source
2 Etymology
3 Purpose
4 Manufacture and contents
4.1 Parchment scrolls
5 Obligation
6 Performance
6.1 How to put on tefillin
7 See also
8 References
9 External links
10 Further reading

Biblical source

The obligation of tefillin, as expounded by the Oral Law, is mentioned four times in the Torah: twice when recalling the The Exodus from Egypt:

And it shall be for a sign for you upon your hand, and for a memorial between your eyes, that the law of the LORD may be in your mouth; for with a strong hand did the LORD bring you out of Egypt.
—Exodus 13:9

And it shall be for a sign upon your hand, and as totafot between your eyes; for with a mighty hand did the LORD bring us forth out of Egypt.
—Exodus 13:16

and twice in the shema passages:

And you shall bind them as a sign upon your arm, and they shall be as totafot between your eyes.
—Deuteronomy 6:8

You shall put these words of mine on your heart and on your soul; and you shall tie them for a sign upon your arm, and they shall be as totafot between your eyes.
—Deuteronomy 11:18

Etymology

The ultimate origin of Hebrew "tefillin" is uncertain.[3] The word "tefillin" is not found in the Bible, which calls them ṭoṭafot. The Septuagint renders "ṭoṭafot" ἀσαλευτόν, "something immovable."[2] Some believe it refers to a charm, similar to the Hebrew neṭifot, "round jewel."[2] The Talmud (Sanhedrin 4b) explains that the word ṭoṭafot is combination of two foreign words: Tot means "two" in the "Caspi" language and Fot means "two" in the "Afriki" language,[4] hence tot and fot means "two and two", corresponding to the four compartments of the head-tefillin.[5] Menahem ben Saruq explains that the word is derived from the Hebrew Ve'hateif and Tatifoo, both expressions meaning "speech", "for when one sees the tefillin it causes him to remember and speak about The Exodus from Egypt."[6]

The first texts to use "tefillin" are the Targumim and Peshitta[2] and it is also used in subsequent Talmudic literature, although the word "ṭoṭafah" was still current, being used with the meaning of "frontlet."[2] "Tefillin" may have derived from the Aramaic palal, "to plead, pray," a word closely related to the Hebrew tefillah, "prayer."[3] Jacob ben Asher (14th century) suggests that "tefillin" is derived from the Hebrew pelilah, "justice, evidence," for tefillin act as a sign and proof of God's presence among the Jewish people.[7]

The only instance of the name "phylacteries" in ancient times occurs once in the Greek New Testament whence it has passed into the languages of Europe.[2] "Phylacteries" derives from the Greek phulaktērion - φυλακτήριον, "defences," and in late Greek, "amulets" or "charms."[8] Neither Aquila nor Symmachus use the word "phylacteries."[2]
Purpose

The tefillin are to serve as a reminder of God's intervention at the time of the Exodus from Egypt.[9] Maimonides details of the sanctity of tefillin and writes that "as long as the tefillin are on the head and on the arm of a man, he is modest and God-fearing and will not be attracted by hilarity or idle talk; he will have no evil thoughts, but will devote all his thoughts to truth and righteousness."[10] The Sefer ha-Chinuch (14th century) adds that the purpose of tefillin is to help subjugate a person's worldly desires and encourage spiritual development.[11] Joseph Caro (16th century) explains that tefillin are placed on the arm adjacent to the heart and on the head above the brain to demonstrate that these two major organs are willing to perform the service of God.[12]
Manufacture and contents
Medieval cylindrical arm-tefillin found in the Cairo genizah
Leather moulded into shape for the head-tefillin
The single scroll of the arm-tefillin

The manufacturing process of both the boxes and the parchment scrolls are intricate and governed by hundreds of detailed rules.[13] In earlier Talmudic times, tefillin were either cylindrical or cubical, but later the cylindrical form became obsolete.[14] Nowadays the boxes should be fashioned from a single piece of animal hide and form a base with an upper compartment to contain the parchment scrolls.[15] They are made in varying levels of quality. The most basic form are called peshutim ("simple") are made using several pieces of parchment to form the inner walls of the head tefillin. The higher quality tefillin, namely dakkot ("thin"), made by stretching a thin piece of leather, and the more durable gassot ("thick") are both fashioned from the single piece of hide.[15] Black leather straps (retsu'ot) pass through the rear of the base and are used to secure the tefillin onto the body.[2] On both sides of the head-tefillin, the Hebrew letter shin (ש) is moulded. The knot of the head-tefillin strap forms the letter dalet (ד) or double dalet (ד) (known as the square-knot) while the strap that is passed through the arm-tefillin is formed into a knot in the shape of the letter yud (י). These three letters spell Shaddai (שדי), one of the names of God.[2]
Parchment scrolls

Four biblical passages which refer to the tefillin are placed inside the leather boxes.[2] (See "Biblical passages contained in Tefillin" template below). They are written by a scribe with special ink on parchment scrolls (klaf).[2] The Hebrew Ashuri script must be and there are three main styles of lettering used: Beis Yosef – generally used by Ashkenazim; Arizal – generally used by Hasidim; Velish – used by Sefardim.[15] The passages contain 3,188 letters usually take between 10–15 hours to complete.[16] The arm-tefillin has one large compartment, which contains all four biblical passages written upon a single strip of parchment.[2] The head-tefillin has four separate compartments in each of which one scroll of parchment is placed.[2]

There was considerable discussion among the commentators of the Talmud as to the order in which the scrolls should be inserted into the four compartments of the head-tefillin.[2] In the Middle Ages, a famous debate on the issue was recorded between Rashi and his grandson Rabbeinu Tam.[2] Rashi held that the passages are placed according to the chronological order as they appear in the Torah: Kadesh Li, Ve-haya Ki Yeviehcha, Shema, Ve-haya Im Shemoa, while according to Rabbeinu Tam, the last two passages are switched around.[17] Sets of tefillin dating from the 1st-century CE discovered at Qumran in the Judean Desert revealed that some were made according to the order understood by Rashi and others in the order of Rabbeinu Tam.[17] The prevailing custom is to arrange the scrolls according to Rashi's view, but some pious Jews are also accustomed to briefly lay the teffilin of Rabbeinu Tam as well,[17] a custom adopted by the Hasidim.[18] The placement of the protrusion of a tuft of the sinew (se'ar eigel) identifies as to which opinion the tefillin were written.[15] The Vilna Gaon, who wore the tefillin of Rashi, rejected the stringency of also laying Rabbeinu Tam, pointing out that there were sixty-four permutations for the arrangement of the tefillin scrolls.[19]
Obligation

The duty of laying tefillin rests upon males after the age of thirteen years.[2] Although women are exempt from the obligation, some early codifers allowed them to do so.[20] Moses Isserles (16th century), however, strongly discourages it.[21] Historically, the mitzvah of tefillin was not performed by women, but the ritual was apparently kept by some women in medieval France and Germany.[22] Traditions exist of some prominent women laying tefillin[23] and the idea is gaining a following among women affiliated to the Conservative movement.[24]

Others who are not obliged to lay tefllin include a mourner during the first day of his mourning period, a bridegroom on his wedding-day.[2] A sufferer from stomach-trouble or one who is otherwise in pain and can not concentrate his mind is also exempt.[2] One who is engaged in the study of the Law and scribes of and dealers in tefillin and mezuzot while engaged in their work if it can not be postponed, are also free from this obligation.[2]

The codes view the commandment of tefillin as important and call those who neglect to observe it "transgressors."[25] Maimonides counts the commandment of laying the arm-tefillin and head-tefillin as two separate positive mitzvot.[10] The Talmud cites Rav Sheshet who said that by neglecting the precept, one transgresses eight positive commandments.[26] A report of widespread laxity in its observance is reported by Moses of Coucy in 13th century Spain. It may have arisen from the fear of persecution, similar to what had occurred to the Jews living in the Land of Israel under Roman rule in the 2nd-century.[9]
Performance
Member of the Chabad Tefillin campaign offers passers-by the opportunity to put on tefilin

Originally tefillin were worn all day, but not during the night. Nowadays the prevailing custom is to wear them only during the weekday morning service,[27] although some individuals wear them at other times during the day as well.

Tefillin are not donned on Shabbat and the major festivals because these holy days are themselves considered "signs" which render the need of the "sign" of tefillin superfluous. On Chol HaMoed (intermediate days) of Pesach and Sukkot, there is a great debate among the early halachic authorities as to whether tefillin should be worn or not. Those who forbid it consider the "sign" of intermediate days as having the same status as the festival itself, making the ritual of tefillin redundant.[28] Others argue and hold that Chol HaMoed does not constitute a "sign" in which case tefillin must be laid.[28] Three customs evolved resulting from the dispute:

To refrain from wearing tefillin: This ruling of the Shulchan Aruch is based on kabbalah and the Zohar which strongly advocate refraining from laying tefillin on Chol HaMoed. This position is maintained by Sephardic Jews and is also the opinion of the Vilna Gaon whose ruling has been universally accepted in Israel.[28]
To wear tefillin without reciting the blessings: This is the opinion of, among others, Jacob ben Asher, Moses of Coucy and David HaLevi Segal. The advantage of this compromise is that one avoids the transgressions of either not donning tefillin or making a blessing in vain.[28]
To wear tefillin and recite the blessings in an undertone: This opinion, based on Maimonides, is the ruling of Moses Isserles who writes that this is the universally accepted practice among Ashkenazic Jews.[28]

In light of the conflicting opinions, the Mishna Berura (20th-century) recommends Ashkenazim make the following stipulation before donning tefillin: "If I am obligated to don tefillin I intend to fulfill my obligation and if I am not obligated to don tefillin, my doing so should not be considered as fulfilling any obligation" and that the blessing not be recited.[29]

On the fast day of Tisha B'Av, tefillin are not worn in the morning as tefillin are considered an "adornment", symbols of beauty, which is deemed inappropriate for a day of mourning. They are worn instead at the afternoon Mincha service.[30]. There are those however who have a Custom(Jews from Allepo,Syria) on Tisha B'Ab to privately put on tefillin at home and pray privately, say the Amida and take off the tefilin and go to synagogue to finish the prayers.
How to put on tefillin
IDF officer davening with tefillin
See also: List of Jewish prayers and blessings: Tefillin

Ashkenazim put on and remove the tefillin while standing, while Sephardim do so while sitting.[31] It is forbidden to speak or be distracted while putting on the tefillin.[31] An Ashkenazi says two blessings when laying tefillin, the first before he ties the arm-tefillin: ...lehani'ach tefillin, and the second after placing the head tefillin: ...al mitzvat tefillin, thereafter he tightens the head straps and says "Baruch Shem Kovod...."[32] The Sephardic custom is that no blessing is said for the head-tefillin, the first blessing sufficing for both.[32] Many members of the Chabad Orthodox movement only recite the blessing on the Head-Tefillah if they spoke about something not related to tefillin since reciting the blessing on the Hand-Tefillah.(this is also the Sephardic custom).

Procedure

The arm-tefillin is laid on the inner side of the bare left arm, two finger breadths above the elbow, so that when the arm is bent the tefillin faces towards the heart.[2] If one is left-handed, it is placed on the right arm in the same place.[2] After the blessing is said, the arm-tefillin is tightened, and the strap wound seven times round the arm.[2] Then the head-tefillin is placed on the middle of the head just above the forehead, so that no parts rests below the hairline.[33] The knot of the head-tefillin sits at the back of the head, upon the part of the occipital bone that protrudes just above the nape, directly opposite the optic chiasm.[34] The two straps of the head-tefillin are brought in front of the shoulders, with their blackened side facing outwards.[2] Now the remainder of the arm-tefillin straps are wound three times around the middle finger and around the hand to form the shape of the Hebrew letter of either a shin (ש) according to Ashkenazim, or a dalet (ד) according to Sephardim. There are various customs regarding winding the strap on the arm and hand.[32] In fact, the arm strap is looped for clockwise wrapping with Ashkenazi tefillin while it is knotted for counter clockwise wrapping with Sephardic and Chabad tefillin. On removing the tefillin, the steps are reversed.[2]



Last edited by 10thlight; 28-01-2013 at 07:53 PM.
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Old 28-01-2013, 11:19 PM   #9
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After posting this stuff. My computer when i turned it on would not load. Had to reboot from a previous stored save.
Just for the record.

Remember be on the square .I mean cube.lol



Watch the feet of the statues.
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Old 29-01-2013, 06:30 PM   #10
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All Seeing Eye of Horus Ritual - During the 9/11 Memorial Service at Ground Zero
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Old 30-01-2013, 07:18 PM   #11
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911 Occult Ritual: The Geomancy and Ley lines of New York City
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CIxy0URHQgI
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Old 07-02-2013, 12:45 AM   #12
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911 is so obvious.That is was inside job.Its like the chemtrail crystalline nano program same thing.
Human are just to naive to see this stuff.Because they cant wrap there head around how evil these people can be.And that things are planned way way in advance.
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