Go Back   David Icke's Official Forums > Main Forums > Ancient & Forbidden Knowledge / False History

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 30-03-2010, 06:17 PM   #501
curly
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,899
Likes: 66 (63 Posts)
Default

curly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-03-2010, 06:19 PM   #502
curly
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,899
Likes: 66 (63 Posts)
Default

Yeah i'll have to get clearer one's of those.i'll mark them up as well
curly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-03-2010, 06:29 PM   #503
curly
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,899
Likes: 66 (63 Posts)
Default

I thought i'd post one or two of these type of things up,these could be something or nothing,i think they are something.These type of markings can be found in the Derbyshire peak district,Yorkshire dales and places like that.I think these are really really really old.There seems to be a lot covered up in these type of areas,or maybe it's the original markings in their entirety.I can't make head nor tail of them yet,but they just don't look right to me.

curly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-03-2010, 06:30 PM   #504
curly
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,899
Likes: 66 (63 Posts)
Default

curly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-03-2010, 06:32 PM   #505
curly
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,899
Likes: 66 (63 Posts)
Default

Could just be the way they farm up there
curly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-03-2010, 06:36 PM   #506
curly
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,899
Likes: 66 (63 Posts)
Default

curly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-03-2010, 06:39 PM   #507
curly
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,899
Likes: 66 (63 Posts)
Default

Just above hill top road there is a big human head that looks like it is looking west but when you go closer he faces east,i'll post a shot of that later,big bird near Orlingbury.

curly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-03-2010, 06:49 PM   #508
curly
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,899
Likes: 66 (63 Posts)
Default

Theres very often a business or farm in the eye of a figure,the lakes you can see are all man-made gravel pits,they stretch for quite a few miles,quarries all along a dragon line i bet.

curly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-03-2010, 07:31 PM   #509
curly
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,899
Likes: 66 (63 Posts)
Default

This is across the river and the town of Raunds[pronounced rorns],notice how the figure meeting the other figure has a new business park as it's eye as well,only in the last few years did that one get built,i grew up in Raunds and there is a graveyard on the main road two arrows lead from that to the eye,there seems to be a natural flow between them.I used to live in the two squares i marked at the top and bottom of the town and also where the cross is marked in the centre of town.There's more Saxon finds around here than you can shake a stick at,there was a major archeological dig going on at a saxon burial ground in rotten row when i was at junior school and we all had to go up there and look at the skeletons in their holes and whatever.Theres a Saxon museum in the town and i remember finding loads of old green coins in all the piles of earth the archeologists had finished with.I think they used to rely on us to find all the bit's they didn't and when we lived in Marshall's road [x] just a couple of hundred yards away my dad dug up a dagger or small sword in the back garden and he ended up throwing it away as we kept having bad luck.The time team even came and dug up our old back garden amongst others a few years back -honestly it was on telly.I also remember seeing a cigar shaped ufo over this area of the dig and i mentioned it in a post on the forum a couple of years ago when someone started a thread called cigar shaped ufo's,this thing was just stationary in the sky when i spotted it as i said over rotten row,i was in the playground and about 8 years old at the time 1975 ish,this cigar shaped thing jigged about a bit at the ends like it was just jigging from side to side,or the ends were morphing is the only word i can think of to describe it.I ran and got my teacher and told him to come and look at it,then he ran off and got the headmaster and he came out and saw it too,i pointed it out to one of my mates but he wasn't interested and then well i can't remember what happened next we must have all just gone back inside.But my point being a ufo over an old burial ground near what i beleive to be a terrestrial dragon[unproved as yet].Sightings of these things near magnetic earth currents and all that stuff.

curly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-03-2010, 07:38 PM   #510
curly
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,899
Likes: 66 (63 Posts)
Default

curly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-03-2010, 08:05 PM   #511
curly
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,899
Likes: 66 (63 Posts)
Default

On the bing map you can see this guy has a nose.His helmet touches the lions nose.

curly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-03-2010, 08:09 PM   #512
lw71
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: ...albion sleeping....
Posts: 492
Likes: 0 (0 Posts)
Default 'Voice Of The Fire'

Relative to Northampton you may be interested by this book if you don't know of it already...

Alan Moore - Voice Of The Fire (1996)


"Voice of the Fire is the first novel from Alan Moore, acclaimed comic book writer. The twelve-chapter tome was initially published in the United Kingdom circa 1996. The narratives take place around Moore's hometown of Northampton, England during the month of November, and span several millennia — from 4000 B.C. to the present day." "The story follows twelve people's lives who lived in the same area of England over a period of 6000 years, and how their lives link to one another's. The opening chapter, "Hob's Hog" proves challenging for many readers, as the first-person narrative voice is supplied as Moore attempts to render the language and thoughts of a character from around 4,000 BC (similar in fashion, though used in a more immersive manner than Russell Hoban's post-apocalyptic characters in Riddley Walker). Each chapter carries the reader forward in time, but circles around the center of Northampton, drawing in historical events and touchstones, before finally segueing into metafictional narrative in the closing chapter, as the author himself comments directly upon the previous chapter's ambiguous closing line, before relating a personal (possibly fictional) anecdote about Northampton which relates a personal experience of local myth, and features an appearance by his daughter and son-in-law, the writers Leah Moore and John Reppion. Throughout, the image of the fire sparks resonances between the tales, while Moore finds a different voice for each character - though most are inherently duplicitous in some manner, leading to a further commentary on the disparity between myth and reality, and which is more likely to endure over time."


http://www.sfsite.com/12b/vf190.htm

"This novel is actually a collection of thematically-linked stories, 12 of them, that all take place in Northampton over a span of 6,000 years. The first story, set in 4,000 BC, is narrated by a simpleton paleolithic nomad, who speaks in a difficult dialect, with a severely limited vocabulary, strange grammar, and a naively warped understanding of the world around him. He's unable, for example, to distinguish dreams from waking reality, and believes that clouds are great amorphous sky-beasts who occasionally devour the sun and then, presumably, spit it out again. (He isn't nearly clever enough to understand the concept of metaphor, so it seems he believes this to be the literal truth about clouds.) The first several pages are particularly difficult, until you manage to get into the swing of this strange dialect. It never becomes easy. It's much like the first time you read Shakespeare as a young child -- you recognize most of the words, but they don't seem to have been fit together in quite the right way, so you only almost understand what you're reading. This first story is nearly 50 pages long, and it's a trying slog all the way through. By the end of it, I found the world looked and sounded strange when I finally glanced up from the pages, trying to interpret what my wife had just said to me in modern, colloquial English.

Each succeeding story uses progressively more elegant language as each jumps ahead further in history, until the last episode, which is set in 1995, the time of the author's writing. The final story appears to be semi(?)-autobiographical, and is largely about the author's difficulty finishing a difficult project that is the book you're reading. On one level, the final story seems somewhat anti-climactic; but on an another level it is ingeniously haunting. None of the stories are what you would call pleasant. They deal with violence, madness, death, mutilation, betrayal, loss of faith, and other such unhappy subjects. Most of them, however, have moments of agonizing brilliance. Ultimately, the book is about the myth and magic of story. Images and events from one tale recur in later one, so that each contains echoes of the others. Finally, all the themes are loosely brought together in that last, authorial-voiced story. The whole is a work of surprising genius."


http://www.themodernword.com/reviews/moore_fire.html

"Originally published in 1996 in the UK, comics writer Alan Moore’s first novel has recently been given its American debut by Top Shelf. Forsaking a continual narrative and spanning some 6000 years, the novel consists of twelve chapters, all of which are set in or around the English city of Northampton during the month of November. As Northampton has been Moore’s hometown for the duration of his life, and November the month of his birth, Voice of the Fire can be taken as a piece of “site-specific” writing in which Moore seeks to get a firmer grasp on the history of the city and his own life. He goes about this psychogeographical experiment by delving into the strata of local legend and history from 4000 BCE to 1995, picking up uncanny details and strange connections along the way.
The origins of this unusual novel most certainly lie in Moore’s 1994 decision to become a magician (think Aleister Crowley or Austin Osman Spare), and Voice of the Fire is one of his first works to directly reflect the impact of that choice. Although it is impossible to summarize Moore’s complex beliefs in a single statement, it is useful to note that for Moore, magic is a way to explore questions about the nature of creativity: What is happening to the artist when he is creating art? What kind of sources are being tapped into during the act of creation? Questions like these are at the heart of the novel, and Moore explores them with his usual ingenuity.
However, since the history of magic and witchcraft is also the history of secrecy and persecution, the novel presents an array of characters trying to understand both their experiences with the supernatural as well as the reactions of the people around them. The encounters range from the comparably mundane to the utterly fantastic – from a fisherman who discovers that the whole population of his village has disappeared without a trace, to witches who conjure up imps to do their bidding.
In his best comics, Moore combines fascinating stories with complex structural arrangements, always careful that his formal innovation remains a crucial aspect of the entire work – readability and coherence are never sacrificed for the sake of a clever gimmick. Watchmen, for instance, uses shifting time frames and parallel narratives, gathering momentum by simultaneously developing numerous related stories across space and time. From Hell revisits the “Jack the Ripper” murders by drawing from a stockpile of relatively ordinary historical characters and occurrences and fusing them into patterns of great narrative force. And while Moore arguably took comics to a “new level” in terms of technique, his work is also known for its blend of heart, wit, and intelligence, and many of his characters have made unforgettable impressions in the mind of his readers.
Above anything else, Moore’s best comics function on the level of literature, and this is the reason that Voice of the Fire succeeds as a novel: the formal fireworks permitted by any one medium never constitute his only point of interest. Although he joggles time frames and bases many of his stories upon elaborate premises, Moore’s main fascination in Voice of the Fire, rests upon our human conception of the world – how it has become increasingly more familiar to us, while at the same time retaining an innate sense of mystery.

The first two stories, which are also the longest ones in the book, introduce the overall intent of the work. In “Hob’s Hog,” a young boy learns for the first time that shamans like the Hob-man truly exist, their aura of power derived from a place outside the normal boundaries of the world:

She is now say of stick-head men, and of they saying-path. [...] Say she, for make this saying-path they stick-head men is want of a strongness and a queer glean that is not hind-whiles in of they. A strongness that come from other world, in neath of dirt, where is they spirit walk.

The second story, called “The Cremation Fields,” features a young trickster who manages to get herself close to a dying “cunning-man.” While patiently waiting for the old man to reveal the location of his treasure, she listens to his troubles in persuading his child to accept the duties of the shaman. The opinions of the cunning-man’s son go on to show that magic has been old-fashioned for a terribly long time – even in 2500 BCE:

Garn will not take up the task, and sets a face against his duty. Says he’s not a cunning-man and makes work as metal-monger, which he thinks a craft more fitted to our time. He says he does not care to know the old and secret ways. We cannot talk save that we quarrel, so we do not talk at all.

By suggesting that life’s mysteries far outweigh the accumulated knowledge of any human being, Hob and layman alike, the conclusion of the story sets the tone for the tales to come. In this light, Voice of the Fire becomes a series of initiations, twelve licks of the flame occurring at the same time.
Despite the obvious changes in character and incident, such a structure still contains the potential for monotony; but Moore is attuned to this danger, and consequentially varies the tempo and texture of his narrative. His prose is both rich and precise, largely rid of the purple excess found in his early comics such as Swamp Thing. Still, Moore is a passionate wordsmith who enjoys the richness of language – whether drawing together an extended mesh of metaphors or describing the minute details of his setting, his forceful style can approach sensory bombardment; a quality that owes something to the prose of Iain Sinclair. But even if Moore may be a spendthrift of words, he’s far closer to a lavisher than a wastrel. For example, here is how the narrator of “The Head of Diocletian,” a Roman official who has been sent to Britain to investigate cases of coin forgery, gives his first impressions of London and its denizens:

When I came to Londinium a half-year since, I thought it hunched and squalid, breeding ugly humours, pestilences in amongst the jetties and the narrow yards, pooled urine yellowing there where the cobbles dip. The locals, hulking Trinovante fishermen or shifty Cantiaci traders, had a pleasing insularity, despite their sullenness. They kept amongst their own kind and made little fuss, yet fresh from home I thought the city Hades; they its fiends and chimaera.

In another chapter, a pair of witches are being burned alive in the year 1705; one of them relates their shared history, and reaches an epiphany of sorts:

Beneath the base of every flame there is a still, clear absence; a mysterious gap between the death of substance and the birth of light, with time itself suspended in this void of transformation, this pause between two elements. I understand it now, that there has only ever been one fire, that blazed before the world began and shall not be put out until the world is done. I see my fellows in the flame, the unborn and the dead.

At the moment of her death, the witch’s final words are words of fire.
Though the general atmosphere of the novel verges between dread and transcendence, humor plays a major role in the proceedings, sometimes even taking the center stage. This is certainly the case with “Confessions of a Mask,” in which a head on a spike receives a new neighbor. “Did you know, Sir, there is something in your eye?” he, a freshly decapitated head, asks his more careworn companion, whose laconic reply is: “Yes, I did. Unless I am mistaken, it’s a lump of coal.”

Voice of the Fire aligns itself with Moore’s other magical “works” of the period, particularly his performances with the grandiosely named The Moon and Serpent Grand Egyptian Theater of Marvels. As he makes evident through these works, the essential assumption behind magic is that an overlay of meaningful symbolism can be assigned to the world. These symbols in turn can be used to build up a conceptual structure which somehow yields results that couldn’t be reached as easily (or at all) by other means. Like religion, philosophy, and other systems of thought, magic tries to strike a balance between so-called reality and its kaleidoscopic distortions. But the thing that seems to separate magic (or at least certain types of magical thinking) from most other models of thought is its willingness to revise its foundations and practices. Magic revels in the complexities of human experience, and doesn’t consider all that ragtag data in the back of our heads as a nuisance. Rather, magic welcomes the distortions and paradoxes that form such a considerable part of the human consciousness, and tries to turn these notions into something truly worthwhile.
In numerous interviews over the past several years, Moore has stressed the close relationship he perceives as existing between magic and art. In fact, Moore sees the two as completely intermingled, and this is precisely what is interesting about his writing, the public manifestations of his magical thinking. In Moore’s recent work, one individual’s flexible set of tools for dealing with the relation between reality and consciousness produces a series of elegant signs and symbols, an artistic clockwork connecting the individual to the universe. A working becomes a work of art, and the unsuspecting reader is none the wiser."
__________________
"Near the day of the Great Purification, there will be cobwebs spun back and forth in the sky"
Pre-Columbian Hopi prophecy

"Facts are stupid things" Ronald Reagan

"The world needs a wake up call, we're gonna phone it in" They Live
lw71 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-03-2010, 08:23 PM   #513
curly
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,899
Likes: 66 (63 Posts)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by lw71 View Post
Relative to Northampton you may be interested by this book if you don't know of it already...

Alan Moore - Voice Of The Fire (1996)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voice_of_the_Fire

"Voice of the Fire is the first novel from Alan Moore, acclaimed comic book writer. The twelve-chapter tome was initially published in the United Kingdom circa 1996. The narratives take place around Moore's hometown of Northampton, England during the month of November, and span several millennia — from 4000 B.C. to the present day." "The story follows twelve people's lives who lived in the same area of England over a period of 6000 years, and how their lives link to one another's. The opening chapter, "Hob's Hog" proves challenging for many readers, as the first-person narrative voice is supplied as Moore attempts to render the language and thoughts of a character from around 4,000 BC (similar in fashion, though used in a more immersive manner than Russell Hoban's post-apocalyptic characters in Riddley Walker). Each chapter carries the reader forward in time, but circles around the center of Northampton, drawing in historical events and touchstones, before finally segueing into metafictional narrative in the closing chapter, as the author himself comments directly upon the previous chapter's ambiguous closing line, before relating a personal (possibly fictional) anecdote about Northampton which relates a personal experience of local myth, and features an appearance by his daughter and son-in-law, the writers Leah Moore and John Reppion. Throughout, the image of the fire sparks resonances between the tales, while Moore finds a different voice for each character - though most are inherently duplicitous in some manner, leading to a further commentary on the disparity between myth and reality, and which is more likely to endure over time."


http://www.sfsite.com/12b/vf190.htm

"This novel is actually a collection of thematically-linked stories, 12 of them, that all take place in Northampton over a span of 6,000 years. The first story, set in 4,000 BC, is narrated by a simpleton paleolithic nomad, who speaks in a difficult dialect, with a severely limited vocabulary, strange grammar, and a naively warped understanding of the world around him. He's unable, for example, to distinguish dreams from waking reality, and believes that clouds are great amorphous sky-beasts who occasionally devour the sun and then, presumably, spit it out again. (He isn't nearly clever enough to understand the concept of metaphor, so it seems he believes this to be the literal truth about clouds.) The first several pages are particularly difficult, until you manage to get into the swing of this strange dialect. It never becomes easy. It's much like the first time you read Shakespeare as a young child -- you recognize most of the words, but they don't seem to have been fit together in quite the right way, so you only almost understand what you're reading. This first story is nearly 50 pages long, and it's a trying slog all the way through. By the end of it, I found the world looked and sounded strange when I finally glanced up from the pages, trying to interpret what my wife had just said to me in modern, colloquial English.

Each succeeding story uses progressively more elegant language as each jumps ahead further in history, until the last episode, which is set in 1995, the time of the author's writing. The final story appears to be semi(?)-autobiographical, and is largely about the author's difficulty finishing a difficult project that is the book you're reading. On one level, the final story seems somewhat anti-climactic; but on an another level it is ingeniously haunting. None of the stories are what you would call pleasant. They deal with violence, madness, death, mutilation, betrayal, loss of faith, and other such unhappy subjects. Most of them, however, have moments of agonizing brilliance. Ultimately, the book is about the myth and magic of story. Images and events from one tale recur in later one, so that each contains echoes of the others. Finally, all the themes are loosely brought together in that last, authorial-voiced story. The whole is a work of surprising genius."


http://www.themodernword.com/reviews/moore_fire.html

"Originally published in 1996 in the UK, comics writer Alan Moore’s first novel has recently been given its American debut by Top Shelf. Forsaking a continual narrative and spanning some 6000 years, the novel consists of twelve chapters, all of which are set in or around the English city of Northampton during the month of November. As Northampton has been Moore’s hometown for the duration of his life, and November the month of his birth, Voice of the Fire can be taken as a piece of “site-specific” writing in which Moore seeks to get a firmer grasp on the history of the city and his own life. He goes about this psychogeographical experiment by delving into the strata of local legend and history from 4000 BCE to 1995, picking up uncanny details and strange connections along the way.
The origins of this unusual novel most certainly lie in Moore’s 1994 decision to become a magician (think Aleister Crowley or Austin Osman Spare), and Voice of the Fire is one of his first works to directly reflect the impact of that choice. Although it is impossible to summarize Moore’s complex beliefs in a single statement, it is useful to note that for Moore, magic is a way to explore questions about the nature of creativity: What is happening to the artist when he is creating art? What kind of sources are being tapped into during the act of creation? Questions like these are at the heart of the novel, and Moore explores them with his usual ingenuity.
However, since the history of magic and witchcraft is also the history of secrecy and persecution, the novel presents an array of characters trying to understand both their experiences with the supernatural as well as the reactions of the people around them. The encounters range from the comparably mundane to the utterly fantastic – from a fisherman who discovers that the whole population of his village has disappeared without a trace, to witches who conjure up imps to do their bidding.
In his best comics, Moore combines fascinating stories with complex structural arrangements, always careful that his formal innovation remains a crucial aspect of the entire work – readability and coherence are never sacrificed for the sake of a clever gimmick. Watchmen, for instance, uses shifting time frames and parallel narratives, gathering momentum by simultaneously developing numerous related stories across space and time. From Hell revisits the “Jack the Ripper” murders by drawing from a stockpile of relatively ordinary historical characters and occurrences and fusing them into patterns of great narrative force. And while Moore arguably took comics to a “new level” in terms of technique, his work is also known for its blend of heart, wit, and intelligence, and many of his characters have made unforgettable impressions in the mind of his readers.
Above anything else, Moore’s best comics function on the level of literature, and this is the reason that Voice of the Fire succeeds as a novel: the formal fireworks permitted by any one medium never constitute his only point of interest. Although he joggles time frames and bases many of his stories upon elaborate premises, Moore’s main fascination in Voice of the Fire, rests upon our human conception of the world – how it has become increasingly more familiar to us, while at the same time retaining an innate sense of mystery.

The first two stories, which are also the longest ones in the book, introduce the overall intent of the work. In “Hob’s Hog,” a young boy learns for the first time that shamans like the Hob-man truly exist, their aura of power derived from a place outside the normal boundaries of the world:

She is now say of stick-head men, and of they saying-path. [...] Say she, for make this saying-path they stick-head men is want of a strongness and a queer glean that is not hind-whiles in of they. A strongness that come from other world, in neath of dirt, where is they spirit walk.

The second story, called “The Cremation Fields,” features a young trickster who manages to get herself close to a dying “cunning-man.” While patiently waiting for the old man to reveal the location of his treasure, she listens to his troubles in persuading his child to accept the duties of the shaman. The opinions of the cunning-man’s son go on to show that magic has been old-fashioned for a terribly long time – even in 2500 BCE:

Garn will not take up the task, and sets a face against his duty. Says he’s not a cunning-man and makes work as metal-monger, which he thinks a craft more fitted to our time. He says he does not care to know the old and secret ways. We cannot talk save that we quarrel, so we do not talk at all.

By suggesting that life’s mysteries far outweigh the accumulated knowledge of any human being, Hob and layman alike, the conclusion of the story sets the tone for the tales to come. In this light, Voice of the Fire becomes a series of initiations, twelve licks of the flame occurring at the same time.
Despite the obvious changes in character and incident, such a structure still contains the potential for monotony; but Moore is attuned to this danger, and consequentially varies the tempo and texture of his narrative. His prose is both rich and precise, largely rid of the purple excess found in his early comics such as Swamp Thing. Still, Moore is a passionate wordsmith who enjoys the richness of language – whether drawing together an extended mesh of metaphors or describing the minute details of his setting, his forceful style can approach sensory bombardment; a quality that owes something to the prose of Iain Sinclair. But even if Moore may be a spendthrift of words, he’s far closer to a lavisher than a wastrel. For example, here is how the narrator of “The Head of Diocletian,” a Roman official who has been sent to Britain to investigate cases of coin forgery, gives his first impressions of London and its denizens:

When I came to Londinium a half-year since, I thought it hunched and squalid, breeding ugly humours, pestilences in amongst the jetties and the narrow yards, pooled urine yellowing there where the cobbles dip. The locals, hulking Trinovante fishermen or shifty Cantiaci traders, had a pleasing insularity, despite their sullenness. They kept amongst their own kind and made little fuss, yet fresh from home I thought the city Hades; they its fiends and chimaera.

In another chapter, a pair of witches are being burned alive in the year 1705; one of them relates their shared history, and reaches an epiphany of sorts:

Beneath the base of every flame there is a still, clear absence; a mysterious gap between the death of substance and the birth of light, with time itself suspended in this void of transformation, this pause between two elements. I understand it now, that there has only ever been one fire, that blazed before the world began and shall not be put out until the world is done. I see my fellows in the flame, the unborn and the dead.

At the moment of her death, the witch’s final words are words of fire.
Though the general atmosphere of the novel verges between dread and transcendence, humor plays a major role in the proceedings, sometimes even taking the center stage. This is certainly the case with “Confessions of a Mask,” in which a head on a spike receives a new neighbor. “Did you know, Sir, there is something in your eye?” he, a freshly decapitated head, asks his more careworn companion, whose laconic reply is: “Yes, I did. Unless I am mistaken, it’s a lump of coal.”

Voice of the Fire aligns itself with Moore’s other magical “works” of the period, particularly his performances with the grandiosely named The Moon and Serpent Grand Egyptian Theater of Marvels. As he makes evident through these works, the essential assumption behind magic is that an overlay of meaningful symbolism can be assigned to the world. These symbols in turn can be used to build up a conceptual structure which somehow yields results that couldn’t be reached as easily (or at all) by other means. Like religion, philosophy, and other systems of thought, magic tries to strike a balance between so-called reality and its kaleidoscopic distortions. But the thing that seems to separate magic (or at least certain types of magical thinking) from most other models of thought is its willingness to revise its foundations and practices. Magic revels in the complexities of human experience, and doesn’t consider all that ragtag data in the back of our heads as a nuisance. Rather, magic welcomes the distortions and paradoxes that form such a considerable part of the human consciousness, and tries to turn these notions into something truly worthwhile.
In numerous interviews over the past several years, Moore has stressed the close relationship he perceives as existing between magic and art. In fact, Moore sees the two as completely intermingled, and this is precisely what is interesting about his writing, the public manifestations of his magical thinking. In Moore’s recent work, one individual’s flexible set of tools for dealing with the relation between reality and consciousness produces a series of elegant signs and symbols, an artistic clockwork connecting the individual to the universe. A working becomes a work of art, and the unsuspecting reader is none the wiser."
That sounds absolutely fascinating,i tried to get a ticket to see him speak a while back,just because of his connections to v for vendetta,he still lives in the town and does little talks occasionally,but they were gone like a flash.I've just got a few pics i just found to post up then i will settle down to read that.cheers
curly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-03-2010, 08:28 PM   #514
lw71
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: ...albion sleeping....
Posts: 492
Likes: 0 (0 Posts)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by timelord View Post
The first thought I had when I saw this thread was Holly Wells, one of the two children murdered, allegedly, by Ian Huntley in Soham.
http://ellisctaylor.homestead.com/bmalignments.html
__________________
"Near the day of the Great Purification, there will be cobwebs spun back and forth in the sky"
Pre-Columbian Hopi prophecy

"Facts are stupid things" Ronald Reagan

"The world needs a wake up call, we're gonna phone it in" They Live
lw71 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-03-2010, 08:39 PM   #515
curly
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,899
Likes: 66 (63 Posts)
Default

A better view of the lion

curly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-03-2010, 08:41 PM   #516
curly
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,899
Likes: 66 (63 Posts)
Default

The horse hasn't got wings it was the lions nose i was seeing the beginning of,things just got an awful lot bigger.
curly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-03-2010, 08:47 PM   #517
curly
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,899
Likes: 66 (63 Posts)
Default

Another two birds at Geddington chase above the lion

curly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-03-2010, 08:48 PM   #518
curly
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,899
Likes: 66 (63 Posts)
Default

curly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-03-2010, 08:49 PM   #519
curly
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,899
Likes: 66 (63 Posts)
Default

curly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-03-2010, 08:54 PM   #520
curly
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,899
Likes: 66 (63 Posts)
Default

I think this is the lions front paw.

curly is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 11:06 AM.


Shoutbox provided by vBShout (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.