Thread: Persian Empire
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Old 10-09-2015, 02:08 PM   #3
lightgiver
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Arrow Satrap


Knights Inn..

Sheep's Heid Inn, interior..
Quote:
Satraps were the governors of the provinces of the ancient Median and Achaemenid (Persian) Empires and in several of their successors, such as the Sasanian Empire and the Hellenistic empires..The word satrap is also often used metaphorically in modern literature to refer to world leaders or governors who are heavily influenced by larger world superpowers or hegemonies and act as their surrogates...


Hospitality Industry...

The word "satrap" originates ultimately (via Ancient Greek and Latin) from Old Persian xšaçapāvan ("protector of the province"), Sanskrit kshatrapam (क्षत्रपम्) or kshtrapa, from xšaça ("realm" or "province") and pāvan ("protector").. In Greek, the word was rendered as satrápēs (σατράπης)—which later borrowed into Latin as satrapes—from a Western Iranian cognate xšaθrapā(van). In modern Persian the descendant of xšaθrapāvan is shahrbān (شهربان), but the components have undergone semantic shift so the word now means "town keeper" (shahr [شهر] meaning "town" + bān [بان] meaning "keeper")..

The first large scale use of satrapies, or provinces, originates from the conception of the first Persian Empire under Cyrus the Great, beginning at around 530 BCE.. However, provincial organization originated during the Median era from at least 648 BCE..Up to the time of the conquest of Media by Cyrus the Great, emperors ruled the conquered lands, through client kings and governors.. The chief difference was that in Persian culture the concept of kingship was indivisible from divinity: divine authority validated the divine right of kings..The 26 satraps established by Cyrus, were never kings, but viceroys ruling in the king's name, although in political reality many grabbed any chance to carve themselves an independent power base.. Darius the Great gave the satrapies a definitive organization, increased their number to 36 and fixed their annual tribute...

It is also used in modern times to refer (usually derogatorily) to the loyal subservient lieutenants or clients of some powerful figure (with equal imprecision also styled mogul, tycoon, or the like), in politics or business..In the Serbian language, "satrap" is used to mock a person who displays servile tendencies to an authority figure...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inn
http://biblehub.com/luke/2-7.htm
http://forum.davidicke.com/showthrea...=84188&page=46Are you still to learn that the end and perfection of our victories is to avoid the vices and infirmities of those whom we subdue?..The key to a great story is not who, or what, or when, but why...http://forum.davidicke.com/showpost....2&postcount=46

Last edited by lightgiver; 10-09-2015 at 02:13 PM.
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