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Old 09-02-2019, 08:36 AM   #125
iamawaveofthesea
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Vaccinating against chickenpox often causes shingles, even in children
Friday, February 08, 2019 by: Jessica Dolores

According to researchers from Harvard Medical School, healthy children who were vaccinated for chickenpox developed shingles soon after. The study, published in the journal Pediatric Dermatology, looked at case studies of shingles that were first thought to be skin rashes.
Shingles and chickenpox are cut from the same cloth

Both shingles and chickenpox come from the varicella-zoster virus. When a person first comes in contact with the virus, usually by touching or breathing it in, it results to “itchy, fluid-filled blisters” that result to scabs – the common symptoms of chickenpox.

A person with chickenpox will experience headaches and fevers, feel tired, and lose his appetite as a result of the condition, which usually lasts from five to seven days.

Some parents consider vaccines to prevent their children from the condition; however, this does not guarantee that they are completely protected. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, people who have been vaccinated may still get chickenpox. In some cases, it may develop to be as serious as those without vaccination. (Related: Chickenpox vaccine now causing shingles epidemic in children and adults.)

After having chickenpox, the virus “hibernates” in nerve tissue near the spinal cord and the brain. While the reasons for the reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus are still unclear, it can reactivate and travel along nerve pathways to the skin – this is the onset of shingles.
https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-02-...-children.html
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