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Old 31-12-2018, 07:47 PM   #46
TheArranger
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The OP’s own contribution to this thread boils down to a collection of posts picturing historic characters, coins, medals and such memorabilia with mostly stupid comments by someone who fails to understand the meaning of the motto in the first place and snobbishly ignores whoever tries to explain it… If you consider yourself too high to mingle with ‘common people’ then don’t post on a public forum…

History tells that the countess of Salisbury one night dropped her garter when dancing at a ball. King Edward III picked the clothe from the ground and spotting looks in the assistance he pronounced the sentence which therefore had to be a well-known French proverb at the time already. But that’s not all what the king said…

Addressing the mocking or suspicious guests Edward III stated that even the attending knights should be honored to wear that garter, and the king then thought of creating a new order bearing that name.

It has to be précised that the king would refer to the countesse’s own garter and not just to the piece of clothing, since men in the 14th century when the order was created used to wear it as well to hold their kind of ‘shoes’. It thus appears that the king was considering the owner of the object but also its color, and that’s how it was decided that the order’s symbol should be blue.

Now you got to grow a bit of subtlety before to pretend to accurately translate in English a proverb that was in use at the 14th century and in Old French, considering that its precise meaning must have been preserved along the time through some language licence. This one designs the fact of attributing to a word slightly different connotation or signification than the ones it originally or seemingly has, which has been widely used in poetry. That’s in case you didn’t know…

The verb to think is thus here be given the meaning of seeing rather than thinking, the correct translation being the one I previously mentioned here before to get ‘royally’ ignored and name called by the OP. Penser à mal is mainly used ex-post to mean that one was ill-intended in one’s acts, words or thoughts, so it has really nothing to do with ‘thinking evil of something’… it’s less judgement than speculation…

And if you got left even two functional brain cells you realize it’s common sense because it’s not the mere fact for anyone to pick something from the ground that could have aroused the mocking guests at the ball, but the facts that it was the king and that the garter was the one of the countess. Subtlety…

So don’t seek to wrongfully apply to different situations or configurations the meaning of the motto you got wrong in the first place just to make it say what you and only you got in your deranged mind. Instead see it as a mere symbol that had to appear on anything more or less closely related to the order and its historic or contemporary members like for instance the frontispiece of monuments, official buildings or documents.

Countless people have been members of the order since its creation like they were of many other ones in the meantime, so it neither means anything let alone in centuries where kings and noblemen would marry their fellows and often related from other countries when Europe hadn’t yet been made an utopia or a false flag…

Now go ahead and call me ‘flower’, you cauliflower…





this one wasn't that good but anyway… :|

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Last edited by TheArranger; 31-12-2018 at 09:02 PM.
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