Thread: Tribe of Dan
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Old 29-08-2014, 04:55 PM   #632
lightgiver
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Arrow 5 Boroughs


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The Danelaw, as recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (also known as the Danelagh; Old English: Dena lagu; Danish: Danelagen), is a historical name given to the part of England in which the laws of the Danes held sway and dominated those of the Anglo-Saxons. It is contrasted with West Saxon law and Mercian law. The term has been extended by modern historians to be geographical.. The areas that constituted the Danelaw are in northern and eastern England. The origins of the Danelaw arose from the Viking expansion of the 9th century, although the term was not used to describe a geographic area until the 11th century. With the increase in population and productivity in Scandinavia, Viking warriors, having sought treasure and glory in the nearby British Isles, "proceeded to plough and support themselves", in the words of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, for the year 876..Danelaw is also used to describe the set of legal terms and definitions created in the treaties between the West-Saxon king, Alfred the Great, and the Danish warlord, Guthrum, written following Guthrum's defeat at the Battle of Edington in 878. In 886, the Treaty of Alfred and Guthrum was formalised, defining the boundaries of their kingdoms, with provisions for peaceful relations between the English and the Vikings..The Danelaw roughly comprises 15 shires: Yorkshire, Five Boroughs of Leicester, Nottingham, Derby, Stamford and Lincoln, as well as Essex, the Kingdom of East Anglia shires of Cambridgeshire, Suffolk and Norfolk, East Midlands shires of Northamptonshire, Huntingdonshire, Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire, Middlesex and Buckinghamshire; one third of the total area of the English kingdom at the time..Major archaeological sites that bear testimony to the Danelaw are few. The most famous is the site at York. Another Danelaw site is the cremation site at Heath Wood, Ingleby, Derbyshire..Thynghowe was an important Danelaw meeting place, today located in Sherwood Forest, in Nottinghamshire. The word "howe" often indicates a prehistoric burial mound. Howe is derived from the Old Norse word Haugr meaning mound...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Five_Bo...of_the_Danelaw
http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showp...3&postcount=13We are in danger of being overwhelmed with irredeemable paper, mere paper, representing not gold nor silver; no sir, representing nothing but broken promises, bad faith, bankrupt corporations, cheated creditors and a ruined people..In politics, nothing happens by accident..If it happened, you can bet it was planned that way...http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showp...&postcount=251

Last edited by lightgiver; 29-08-2014 at 04:56 PM.
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