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Old 18-04-2014, 12:53 AM   #15
lightgiver
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Arrow Pararescue


Quote:
The number of the 39 categories of activity prohibited on Shabbat according to Halakha..The actual number of lashes given by the Sanhedrin to a person meted the punishment of 40 lashes..The number of Scud missiles which Iraq fired at Israel during the Gulf War in 1991..In Afghanistan, the number 39 is considered unlucky, due to the belief that it is associated with pimps, allegedly living in the western city of Herat, who was nicknamed "39" after the registration plate of his expensive car and the number of his apartment...http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z9c7EAlfyaM
Pararescuemen, also known as PJs (Pararescue Jumpers), are United States Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC) and Air Combat Command (ACC) operatives tasked with recovery and medical treatment of personnel in humanitarian and combat environments. These special operations units are also used to support NASA missions and have been used to recover astronauts after water landings. They are attached to other SOF teams from all branches to conduct other operations as appropriate. Of the 22 enlisted Air Force Cross recipients, 12 are Pararescuemen. They wear the maroon beret as a symbol of their elite status, and to symbolize the blood shed by past PJs, as well as the blood current PJs are willing to shed to save lives. Part of the little-known Air Force Special Operations community and long an enlisted preserve, the Pararescue service began commissioning Combat Rescue Officers early in the 21st century...

The Vietnam War was a pivotal conflict for the Pararescue teams. The Air Force's scope of operations became so large that demand for Pararescue teams expanded as well. The use of helicopters caused new tactics utilizing the speed, distance, and support they could provide. Rescue "packages" were created utilizing FACs (Forward Air Controllers), rescue escorts (such as AH-1 Cobras or A-1 Sandys), protective fighter CAP (Combat Air Patrol), HC-130 "King" Hercules for Rescue Mission Coordination and helicopter refueling, and the HH-3 Jolly Green Giant and HH-53 Super Jolly Green Giant helicopters to provide fast rescue for pilots shot down far behind enemy lines. Pararescue personnel were part of these packages to provide medical assistance for injured aircrew as well as the ability to patrol for missing aircrew that might have been unconscious or dead..Pararescue team members would be inserted to conduct LSO (Limited Surface Operations) searches while the escorts maintained an aggressive patrol to provide instantaneous support. Sometimes they would be inserted to search for personnel who were being forced to escape and evade; in such cases the mission might last for days...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ddvmEo60gf4
Quote:
Headhunting was practised by many Austronesian people in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Islands. Headhunting has at one time or another existed among most of the peoples of Melanesia,including New Guinea.. A missionary found 10,000 skulls on Goaribari Island in 1901..In Southeast Asia, anthropological writings exist on the Murut, Ilongot, Iban, Dayak, Berawan, Wana, and Mappurondo tribes. Among these groups, headhunting was usually a ritual activity rather than an act of war or feuding and involved the taking of a single head..In what is now known as New Zealand, the Māori preserved the heads of enemies, removing the skull and smoking the head. Māori are currently attempting to reclaim the heads of their ancestors held in museums outside New Zealand.. "Samurai also sought glory by headhunting. When a battle ended, the warrior, true to his mercenary origins, would ceremoniously present trophy heads to a general, who would variously reward him with promotions in rank, gold or silver, or land from the defeated clan..Headhunting was a common practice among the Taiwanese aborigines has been a practice among the Naga tribes of India and Myanmar.. Shuar in Ecuador and Peru, along the Amazon River, practised headhunting in order to make shrunken heads for ritual use..The Quechua Lamistas in Peru..A tzompantli is a type of wooden rack or palisade documented in several Mesoamerican civilizations that was used for the public display of human skulls, typically those of war captives or other sacrificial victims...http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_GRATs8h-bI
http://www.189thahc.org/link.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_...rce_Pararescue
http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showp...&postcount=426Yes. We must follow the custom.. A fresh cup of T is poured for the loved one departing..A place rich with all the strange beauty of your nighttime dreams...http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showp...&postcount=842

Last edited by lightgiver; 18-04-2014 at 12:53 AM.
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