Thread: On The Square
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Old 17-07-2012, 05:06 PM   #13
lightgiver
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Lightbulb St James's SQUARE

WPC Yvonne Joyce Fletcher (15 June 1958 – 17 April 1984) was a British police officer who was shot and killed in London's St James's SQUARE while on duty during a protest outside the Libyan embassy. Her death resulted in a police siege of the embassy, which lasted for eleven days. The shooting also caused the breakdown of diplomatic relations between the United Kingdom and Libya. Her death was the third murder or manslaughter of an on-duty mainland British policewoman, only 18 months after the first...No. 5: Present house by Matthew Brettingham 1748–9. Refronted in stone, porch added, and attic converted into a full storey in 1854. Now offices; former Libyan embassy, site of the 1984 Libyan Embassy Siege...

Quote:
"A police officer has been killed and ten people injured after shots were fired from the Libyan People's Bureau in central London. WPC Yvonne Fletcher had been helping control a small demonstration outside the embassy when automatic gunfire came from outside. She received a fatal stomach wound and some of the demonstrators were also severely injured. WPC Fletcher, 25, died soon afterwards at Westminster Hospital."
Nobody has ever been convicted of her murder, though after 15 years the Libyan government finally accepted responsibility for her death and agreed to pay compensation to her family...About 75 protestors arrived by coach from the North of England for the demonstration, and the police kept them and the loyalists apart by the use of crowd control barriers. Loud music was played from the bureau in an apparent attempt to drown out the shouts of the protectors.



At 10:18 on the morning of 17 April 1984, shots were fired into the group of protestors, striking eleven people, including Fletcher. The unarmed officer died of a stomach wound approximately an hour after arriving at the hospital.Meanwhile, Libyan radio reported that the embassy was stormed and that those in the building fired back in self-defense against "a most horrible terrorist action"

The subsequent inquest into her death was told that Fletcher was killed by shots from two Sterling submachine guns from the first floor of the Libyan embassy.

Fletcher’s hat and FOUR other police officers' helmets were left lying in the square during the ensuing siege on the embassy, and images of them were repeatedly shown on British and international television in the days that followed. The British public reacted with horror at the third murder of a British police officer in 18 months.

Memorial in St James's Square to Yvonne Fletcher...


In July 1999, the Libyan government publicly accepted 'general responsibility' for the murder and agreed to pay compensation to Fletcher's family. This, together with Libya's eventual efforts in the aftermath of the Lockerbie bombing, opened the way for the normalisation of relations between the two countries.

"With the agreement of Queenie Fletcher, her mother, I raised with the Home Office the three remarkable programmes that were made by Fulcrum, and their producer, Richard Bellfield, called Murder In St. James's. Television speculation is one thing, but this was rather more than that, because on film was George Styles, the senior ballistics officer in the British Army, who said that, as a ballistics expert, he believed that the WPC could not have been killed from the second floor of the Libyan embassy, as was suggested.


"Also on film was my friend, Hugh Thomas, who talked about the angles at which bullets could enter bodies, and the position of those bodies. Hugh Thomas was, for years, the consultant surgeon of the Royal Victoria hospital in Belfast, and I suspect he knows more about bullets entering bodies than anybody else in Britain. Above that was Professor Bernard Knight, who, on and off, has been the Home Office pathologist for 25 years. When Bernard Knight gives evidence on film that the official explanation could not be, it is time for an investigation."

St. James's Square is the only square in the exclusive St James's district of the City of Westminster. It has predominantly Georgian and neo-Georgian architecture and a private garden in the centre. For its first two hundred or so years it was one of the three or four most fashionable residential address in London, and it is now home to the headquarters of a number of well-known businesses, including BP and Rio Tinto Group, as well as an exclusive club The East India Club. It is also home to The London Library. The square's main feature is an equestrian statue of William III erected in 1808...Nos. 9 to 11: Numbers 9, 10 and 11 were built in the 1730s on the site of the former Ormonde House, once the largest house in the square. Henry Flitcroft supervised number 10 and probably also numbers 9 and 11. No. 10 is Chatham House, former home of British Prime Minister William Pitt the Elder and of the Earl and Countess of Blessington...The human Y chromosome is composed of about 50 million base pairs. DNA in the Y chromosome is passed from father to son, and Y-DNA analysis may thus be used in genealogy research...Ferranti or Ferranti International plc was an UK electrical engineering and equipment firm that operated for over a century from 1885 until it went bankrupt in 1993. Known primarily for defence electronics, the Company was once a constituent of the FTSE 100 Index but ceased trading in 1993...

St James's Square 1799...

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