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Old 04-01-2012, 12:56 AM   #96
lightgiver
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Arrow Rat zinger



Teotihuacan and St. Peter's comparison...

The largely Roman Catholic leadership of the Nazi regime:



The leadership of the Nazi regime was a virtual Catholic men's group,

Adolf Hitler, Heinrich Himmler, Josef Goebbels, Reinhard Heydrich, Rudolf Hoess, Julius Streicher, Fritz Thyssen (who bankrolled the Nazi rise to power), Klaus Barbie, and Franz Von Papen were all Roman Catholics, as were the heads of all of these NAZI countries : Leon Degrelle of Belgium, Emil Hacha of Bohemia-Moravia, Ante Pavelic of Croatia, Konrad Henlein of Sudetenland, Pierre Laval and then Henry Petain of Vichy-France. and the R.C. priest, Msgr. Josef Tiso, of Slovakia.
(who wasn't even defrocked after the defeat of the Nazis).

Although these were among the most visible Catholic lay people in their countries at the time, did Pope Pius XII excommunicate a single one of them? NO. How can anyone say that this pope did "all that he could", when he failed to take this obvious measure so as to make it clear to the millions of Catholic faithful who were enabling the Nazis to carry out their campaigns of mass murder, not only against Jews, but against their fellow Catholics in Poland, that they should have no part in these monstrous of crimes and most mortal of sins?

On the other hand, after the Nazis were defeated and no longer posed any threat to the pope, the Vatican, or the Catholic Church anywhere, did Pope Pius XII allow the Vatican to be used to protect thousands of Catholic war criminals such as the above to escape punishment for their war crimes? YES. Whose side was the pope on?



# Here are some of the more infamous war criminals the Vatican protected from prosecution: Adolf Eichmann, "the architect of the Holocaust",

# Alois Brunner , referred to as his "best man" by Eichman,
# Dr. Josef Mengele, "the Angel of Death" ,
# Franz Stangl, commandant of the Sobibór and of Treblinka extermination camp ,
# Gustav Wagner assistant to Franz Stangl,
# Klaus Barbie, "the Butcher of Lyon" ,
# Edward Roschmann, "the Butcher of Riga",
# Aribert Heim, Mauthausen concentration camp's "Dr. Death",
# Walter Rauff, believed responsible for nearly 100,000 deaths

# Otto Wächter, who from 1939 on, as governor of the Cracow district, Wächter organized the persecution of the Jews and ordered the establishment of the Cracow Ghetto in 1941. Wächter is mentioned as one of the leading advocates in the General Government who were in favor of the Jewish extermination by gassing and as a member of the SS team who under Himmler's supervision and Odilo Globocnik's direction planned Operation Reinhard, the first phase of the Final Solution, leading to the death of more than 2,000,000 Polish Jews. After the war Wächter lived in a Roman monastery "as a monk", under the protection of Bishop Hudal, until 1949, when he died "in the arms" of Bishop Huda at the Roman hospital of Santo Spirito.
# Andrija Artuković, "the Himmler of the Balkans"
# Ante Pavelić, head of Catholic Croatia, arguably the most murderous regime in relation to its size in Axis-occupied Europe.

"Hitler, Goebbels, Himmler and most members of the party's "old guard" were Catholics", wrote M. Frederic Hoffet. "It was not by accident that, because of its chiefs' religion, the National-socialist government was the most Catholic Germany ever had. . . This kinship between National-socialism and Catholicism is most striking if we study closely the propaganda methods and the interior organisation of the party. On that subject, nothing is more instructive than Joseph Goebbel's works. He had been brought up in a Jesuit college and was a seminarian before devoting himself to literature and politics. . . Every page, every line of his writings recall the teaching of his masters; so he stresses obedience. . . the contempt for truth. . . "Some lies are as useful as bread!" he proclaimed by virtue of a moral relativism extracted from Ignatius of Loyola's writings..."

Frederic Hoffet: "L'lmperialisme protestant" (Flammarion, Paris 1948, pp.172 ss).
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