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Old 01-10-2011, 09:33 PM   #306
lightgiver
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Arrow Viking


The film was inspired by Jones's children's book The Saga of Erik the Viking (1983), but the plot is completely different...



Principal photography took place at Shepperton Studios. Some footage of Erik's village and environments was shot in Norway, while the Hy-Brasil sequence was filmed in Malta.

Little Ellephant haven...


http://forum.davidicke.com/showthrea...1060&page=1921

Louise of Sweden as Princess of Denmark

with her sister-in-law Princess Thyra of Denmark.


The castle's story dates back to a fortress, Krogen, built in the 1420s by the Danish king, Eric of Pomerania. The king insisted on the payment of sound dues by all ships wishing to enter or leave the Baltic Sea...



to help enforce his demands, he built a powerful fortress controlling the sound. It then consisted of a number of buildings inside a surrounding wall.

The "Ballad of Eric" (Swedish: "Eriksvisan") is a ballad found in Latin and Swedish about the legendary Gothic king Erik, elsewhere known as Berig. It was once seen as a valuable source for Migration Period history, but is now regarded as inauthentic fakelore created during the 16th century...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric View Post
The consensual chronology we live with was essentially crafted in the 16th century by Jesuits.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PZ-vqiBvMo8
http://youtu.be/PZ-vqiBvMo8

Has history been tampered with? Did events and eras such as the crucifixion of Jesus Christ, the Roman Empire , the Dark Ages, and the Renaissance, actually occur within a very different chronology from what we've been told? Yes, they certainly did! The history of humankind is both drastically shorter and dramatically different than generally presumed.
Why is it so? On one hand, it was usual custom to justify the claims to title and land by age and ancestry, and on the other the court historians knew only too well how to please their masters. The so called universal classic world history is a pack of intricate lies for all events prior to the 16th century. It's likely that nobody told you before, but
there is not a single piece of firm written evidence or artifact that is reliably and independently dated prior to the 11th century.
Naturally, after what you've learned in school and university, you will not easily believe that the classical history of ancient Rome, Greece, Asia, Egypt, China, Japan, India, etc., is manifestly false.

You will point accusing finger to the pyramids in Egypt, to the Coliseum in Rome and Great Wall of China etc., and claim, aren't they really ancient, thousands of years ancient? Well, there is no valid scientific proof that they are older than 1000 years!

The oldest original written document that can be reliably dated belongs to the 11th century!

New research asserts that Homo sapiens invented writing (including hieroglyphics) only 1000 years ago. Once invented, writing skills were immediately and irreversibly put to the use of ruling powers and science.

The consensual chronology we live with was essentially crafted in the 16th century by Jesuits.

Early in life, we learn by heart the names and deeds of brave warriors, wise philosophers, fabulous pharaohs, cunning high priests and greedy scribes. We learn of gigantic pyramids and sinister castles, kings and queens, dukes and barons, powerful heroes and beautiful ladies, emaciated saints and low-life traitors. Dr debunks not merely the odd pillar, but the total, entire bastion of historical dating, proposing a 700 to 1000 year fictitious "add-on" section between 400 AD and 1100 AD (or larger) & argues that the conventional chronology sequence of almost EVERYTHING is erroneous.

Commentarii de Bello Civili (literally Commentaries on the Civil War in Latin) is an account written by Julius Caesar of his war against Gnaeus Pompeius and the Senate. Shorter than its counterpart on the Gallic War, only three books long, and possibly unfinished, it covers the events of 49-48 BC, from shortly before Caesar's invasion of Italy to Pompey's defeat at the Battle of Pharsalus and flight to Egypt with Caesar in pursuit. It closes with Pompey assassinated, Caesar attempting to mediate rival claims to the Egyptian throne, and the beginning of the Alexandrian War.

Caesar's authorship of the Commentarii de Bello Civili is not disputed. However, its continuations on the Alexandrian, African and Hispanic wars are believed to have been written by others: the 2nd century historian Suetonius suggested Aulus Hirtius and Gaius Oppius as possible authors

The Latin title Commentarii de Bello Civili is often retained as the title of the book in English translations of the work. The title itself is Latin for "Commentaries on the Civil War". It is sometimes shortened to just "Civil Wars", "About the Civil Wars", and "The Civil War", in English translations

Modern historians lament that fact that Caesar omits many important details about the military events, primarily because the book is the only source known to exist for many of the events that occurred in it, but also because it was written from the unique perspective of the most powerful figure in the Republic and one of the most notable generals in human history. Caesar also does not present a neutral picture and at every opportunity distorts the goals and positions of his enemies in favour of his own position, but does so in a subtle manner sometimes difficult to detect.

The book was for a time lost, but was rediscovered in Italian city archives in the Middle Ages. The oldest known manuscripts of the commentaries date to the tenth century AD. Parts of the book have remained lost though, with at least sixteen passages known to be missing

Lucanus, De bello civili ed. Pulmann (Plantin 1592)
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...title_page.jpg

Commentarii de Bello Civili (literally Commentaries on the Civil War in Latin) is an account written by Julius Caesar of his war against Gnaeus Pompeius and the Senate. Shorter than its counterpart on the Gallic War, only three books long, and possibly unfinished, it covers the events of 49-48 BC, from shortly before Caesar's invasion of Italy to Pompey's defeat at the Battle of Pharsalus and flight to Egypt with Caesar in pursuit. It closes with Pompey assassinated, Caesar attempting to mediate rival claims to the Egyptian throne, and the beginning of the Alexandrian War.

Caesar's authorship of the Commentarii de Bello Civili is not disputed. However, its continuations on the Alexandrian, African and Hispanic wars are believed to have been written by others: the 2nd century historian Suetonius suggested Aulus Hirtius and Gaius Oppius as possible authors

Plantin emblema from title page of Lucanus, De bello civili ed. Pulmann (1592)


Commentarii de Bello Civili, along with Caesar's other literary works, became staple reading for Latin studies around the world because of the quality and excellent grammar employed by Caesar in his writings.

Joseph Justus Scaliger (August 5, 1540 – January 21, 1609) was a French religious leader and scholar, known for expanding the notion of classical history from Greek and Ancient Roman history to include Persian, Babylonian, Jewish and Ancient Egyptian history.

He was born at Agen, the tenth child and third son of Italian scholar Julius Caesar Scaliger and Andiette de Roques Lobejac.

History - Fiction or Science (1):

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=f...page&q&f=false

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Chronology_(Fomenko)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronology


http://forum.davidicke.com/showthrea...t=57365&page=4

http://forum.davidicke.com/showthrea...62415&page=105

Last edited by lightgiver; 01-10-2011 at 09:57 PM.
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