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2 hours ago, Comedy Time said:

 

No. To get to the Moon, you need something light enough to be accelerated from here and slowed down when it gets there. The shuttle simply cannot do either.

The point was it is very much more accessible than mars. More serviceable. The semantics of rocket technology were a little above my knowledge. That said....moon rocket technology versus mars rocket technology? Hmmm. I would suggest most people can see the one needs much more complex fuel, food, medicine, human biology consideraration than the other? And yet it is mars we are trying to colonise ..not the moon.

 

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Just read the book Gregory pecary put the link up for,( cheers for that)  well recommended.    Agreed they make a compelling case.   Now where did I park my Dolorean. 

We have over 80 pages of the flat earth thread then in the space section with regards to the gravity error it was turned into a flat earth thread and now when we are trying to have a logical discussio

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49 minutes ago, kj35 said:

The point was it is very much more accessible than mars. More serviceable. The semantics of rocket technology were a little above my knowledge. That said....moon rocket technology versus mars rocket technology? Hmmm. I would suggest most people can see the one needs much more complex fuel, food, medicine, human biology consideraration than the other? And yet it is mars we are trying to colonise ..not the moon.

 

 

Colonise Mars ....pie in the sky. They need to overcome enormous hurdles. Not least that Mars has no magnetosphere and consequently doesn't stop solar radiation. Plus stopping it for the really long journey time. 

 

The food and stuff would be dead easy in comparison.

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On 10/11/2020 at 1:38 PM, Comedy Time said:

 

Colonise Mars ....pie in the sky. They need to overcome enormous hurdles. Not least that Mars has no magnetosphere and consequently doesn't stop solar radiation. Plus stopping it for the really long journey time. 

 

The food and stuff would be dead easy in comparison.

We agree then.its madness. They should be looking closer to home. Ie THE MOON. 

 

Which was my original point 

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On 10/6/2020 at 12:10 AM, Basket Case said:

 

lndeed.
Why ?
 

 

WHY IS THE MOON UPSIDE DOWN IN AUSTRALIA

 

I've lived in Australia all my life ,and let me tell you the moon has always been the right way up 🤔 I think

Edited by peter
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13 minutes ago, peter said:

 

WHY IS THE MOON UPSIDE DOWN IN AUSTRALIA

 

I've lived in Australia all my life ,and let me tell you the moon has always been the right way up 🤔 I think

 

I've spent most of my time in South London but have travelled a lot. 

I spent 18 months in Australia travelling all over. The sky there is totally amazing. So much clearer than anything I've ever seen in Europe. 

I have a very clear recollection of being inland in the Flat Lands - a small town called Hay I believe, half a days drive from Forbes and the Parkes historic Observatory. 

The night sky literally blew my mind.

I sat outside at night for hours - absolutely stunned and in total awe. It looked like some super being had graffitied on the sky with a huge can of white splatter spray. The Moon as you say was the right way up for Australia (wrong way for Europe) and what constellations that could be seen in the overwhelming sky were totally alien to a European. 

The Earth we've been given to inhabit in this Realm we call Reality has been presented to us as a Globe. 

BC 

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6 hours ago, Basket Case said:

 

I've spent most of my time in South London but have travelled a lot. 

I spent 18 months in Australia travelling all over. The sky there is totally amazing. So much clearer than anything I've ever seen in Europe. 

I have a very clear recollection of being inland in the Flat Lands - a small town called Hay I believe, half a days drive from Forbes and the Parkes historic Observatory. 

The night sky literally blew my mind.

I sat outside at night for hours - absolutely stunned and in total awe. It looked like some super being had graffitied on the sky with a huge can of white splatter spray. The Moon as you say was the right way up for Australia (wrong way for Europe) and what constellations that could be seen in the overwhelming sky were totally alien to a European. 

The Earth we've been given to inhabit in this Realm we call Reality has been presented to us as a Globe. 

BC 

yes when your out in the sticks the night sky is something to behold

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nearly finished the book Penetration by Ingo Swan ,he has some very interesting things to say about the moon and the ensuing coverup by NASA and other agencies. An interesting book with rather original insights, if anyone is interested .

 

I ordered the special edition as the original is hard to come by and rather expensive 

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7 hours ago, peter said:

nearly finished the book Penetration by Ingo Swan ,he has some very interesting things to say about the moon and the ensuing coverup by NASA and other agencies. An interesting book with rather original insights, if anyone is interested .

 

I ordered the special edition as the original is hard to come by and rather expensive 

I loved it. Where he describes his remote viewing is exactly what I experienced accidentally.  So for me Ingo Swann is the real deal  I have no doubt he wasn't allowed to share everything he knew and also there must be some misinformation aschete seems to be misinformation everywher. But on the whole I find him excellent. 

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It is also interesting how this information tallies with that of John Lear's concerning certain aspects of the moon regarding water and thin atmosphere etc during an interview primarily to do with Bob Lazar . However I can't say weather this information came  to him by way of  Ingo Swan's book in the first place, as it was many years ago when I saw the interview

 

I believe the interview was done by Project Camelot

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12 hours ago, peter said:

It is also interesting how this information tallies with that of John Lear's concerning certain aspects of the moon regarding water and thin atmosphere etc during an interview primarily to do with Bob Lazar . However I can't say weather this information came  to him by way of  Ingo Swan's book in the first place, as it was many years ago when I saw the interview

 

I believe the interview was done by Project Camelot

Will look into that. Thank you

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  • 3 weeks later...

I hope this is a new question.

Way, way back there was going to be a collision, The earth was bigger so the core of the moon moved as the bodies got closer to the extent the heavy metals erupted in huge volcanoes only the metal fell to earth rather than back on the moon. After shedding a lot of weight the lighter body was able to start drifting away and the earth had two big holes, the GOM and Hudson Bay to the north, and a wobble we still have today. The holes on the far side of the moon are sinkholes, caused by an unbreakable suction as the core moved in the opposite direction.

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On 12/26/2020 at 12:17 AM, Wayfaring Stranger said:

I hope this is a new question.

Way, way back there was going to be a collision, The earth was bigger so the core of the moon moved as the bodies got closer to the extent the heavy metals erupted in huge volcanoes only the metal fell to earth rather than back on the moon. After shedding a lot of weight the lighter body was able to start drifting away and the earth had two big holes, the GOM and Hudson Bay to the north, and a wobble we still have today. The holes on the far side of the moon are sinkholes, caused by an unbreakable suction as the core moved in the opposite direction.

I think you are describing the wack theory ,which proved to be bullshit so they came up with the double wack theory which is still a no go

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9 hours ago, peter said:

I just got hold of the book Ingo Swan recommended by Fred Steckling ( we discovered Alien bases on the moon),I managed to pick it up for half  what people were asking , still expensive though so I hope it's worth it

I think so. I really rate Ingo. One of the few who actually tried to teach others and not 'Lord it over ' them 

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Well I'm halfway through the new book, it is interesting and there is plenty of original pictures. Like all of these they are rather grainy and you have to look hard at them to see what they are talking about, however ,that said there are quite a few that you look at and go oh shit, anyway I will let you know some interesting points when I finish

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Earth's Moon

Sept. 2, 2020

The Moon Is Rusting, and Researchers Want to Know Why

The Moon as viewed by NASA's Mariner 10 in 1973, well before research would find signs of rust on the airless surface.

Credits: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

Full image and caption

While our Moon is airless, research indicates the presence of hematite, a form of rust that normally requires oxygen and water. That has scientists puzzled.

Mars has long been known for its rust. Iron on its surface, combined with water and oxygen from the ancient past, give the Red Planet its hue. But scientists were recently surprised to find evidence that our airless Moon has rust on it as well.

A new paper in Science Advances reviews data from the Indian Space Research Organization's Chandrayaan-1 orbiter, which discovered water ice and mapped out a variety of minerals while surveying the Moon's surface in 2008. Lead author Shuai Li of the University of Hawaii has studied that water extensively in data from Chandrayaan-1's Moon Mineralogy Mapper instrument, or M3, which was built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California. Water interacts with rock to produce a diversity of minerals, and M3 detected spectra – or light reflected off surfaces – that revealed the Moon's poles had a very different composition than the rest of it.

The blue areas in this composite image from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) aboard the Indian Space Research Organization's Chandrayaan-1 orbiter show water concentrated at the Moon's poles. Homing in on the spectra of rocks there, researcher found signs of hematite, a form of rust.

Credits: ISRO/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Brown University/USGS

Full image and caption

Intrigued, Li homed in on these polar spectra. While the Moon's surface is littered with iron-rich rocks, he nevertheless was surprised to find a close match with the spectral signature of hematite. The mineral is a form of iron oxide, or rust, produced when iron is exposed to oxygen and water. But the Moon isn't supposed to have oxygen or liquid water, so how can it be rusting?

Metal Mystery

The mystery starts with the solar wind, a stream of charged particles that flows out from the Sun, bombarding Earth and the Moon with hydrogen. Hydrogen makes it harder for hematite to form. It's what is known as a reducer, meaning it adds electrons to the materials it interacts with. That's the opposite of what is needed to make hematite: For iron to rust, it requires an oxidizer, which removes electrons. And while the Earth has a magnetic field shielding it from this hydrogen, the Moon does not.

"It's very puzzling," Li said. "The Moon is a terrible environment for hematite to form in." So he turned to JPL scientists Abigail Fraeman and Vivian Sun to help poke at M3's data and confirm his discovery of hematite.

"At first, I totally didn't believe it. It shouldn't exist based on the conditions present on the Moon," Fraeman said. "But since we discovered water on the Moon, people have been speculating that there could be a greater variety of minerals than we realize if that water had reacted with rocks."

After taking a close look, Fraeman and Sun became convinced M3's data does indeed indicate the presence of hematite at the lunar poles. "In the end, the spectra were convincingly hematite-bearing, and there needed to be an explanation for why it's on the Moon," Sun said.

Three Key Ingredients

Their paper offers a three-pronged model to explain how rust might form in such an environment. For starters, while the Moon lacks an atmosphere, it is in fact home to trace amounts of oxygen. The source of that oxygen: our planet. Earth's magnetic field trails behind the planet like a windsock. In 2007, Japan's Kaguya orbiter discovered that oxygen from Earth's upper atmosphere can hitch a ride on this trailing magnetotail, as it's officially known, traveling the 239,000 miles (385,00 kilometers) to the Moon.

That discovery fits with data from M3, which found more hematite on the Moon's Earth-facing near side than on its far side. "This suggested that Earth's oxygen could be driving the formation of hematite," Li said. The Moon has been inching away from Earth for billions of years, so it's also possible that more oxygen hopped across this rift when the two were closer in the ancient past.

Then there's the matter of all that hydrogen being delivered by the solar wind. As a reducer, hydrogen should prevent oxidation from occurring. But Earth's magnetotail has a mediating effect. Besides ferrying oxygen to the Moon from our home planet, it also blocks over 99% of the solar wind during certain periods of the Moon's orbit (specifically, whenever it's in the full Moon phase). That opens occasional windows during the lunar cycle when rust can form.

The third piece of the puzzle is water. While most of the Moon is bone dry, water ice can be found in shadowed lunar craters on the Moon's far side. But the hematite was detected far from that ice. The paper instead focuses on water molecules found in the lunar surface. Li proposes that fast-moving dust particles that regularly pelt the Moon could release these surface-borne water molecules, mixing them with iron in the lunar soil. Heat from these impacts could increase the oxidation rate; the dust particles themselves may also be carrying water molecules, implanting them into the surface so that they mix with iron. During just the right moments – namely, when the Moon is shielded from the solar wind and oxygen is present – a rust-inducing chemical reaction could occur.

More data is needed to determine exactly how the water is interacting with rock. That data could also help explain another mystery: why smaller quantities of hematite are also forming on the far side of the Moon, where the Earth's oxygen shouldn't be able to reach it.

More Science to Come

Fraeman said this model may also explain hematite found on other airless bodies like asteroids. "It could be that little bits of water and the impact of dust particles are allowing iron in these bodies to rust," she said.

Li noted that it's an exciting time for lunar science. Almost 50 years since the last Apollo landing, the Moon is a major destination again. NASA plans to send dozens of new instruments and technology experiments to study the Moon beginning next year, followed by human missions beginning in 2024 all as part of the Artemis program.

JPL is also building a new version of M3 for an orbiter called Lunar Trailblazer. One of its instruments, the High-resolution Volatiles and Minerals Moon Mapper (HVM3), will be mapping water ice in permanently shadowed craters on the Moon, and may be able to reveal new details about hematite as well.

"I think these results indicate that there are more complex chemical processes happening in our solar system than have been previously recognized," Sun said. "We can understand them better by sending future missions to the Moon to test these hypotheses."

Andrew Good
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
818-393-2433
[email protected]

Alana Johnson / Grey Hautaluoma
NASA Headquarters, Washington
202-672-4780 / 202-358-0668
[email protected] / [email protected]

2020-171

Last Updated: Sept. 4, 2020

Editor: Tony Greicius

Tags:  Earth's Moon, Solar System

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On 12/8/2020 at 1:57 PM, amy G said:

https://qph.fs.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-3b4e5db84d572d582645fec5e1a4b301

 

It's good to ask these sort of questions ... Some might think the curve in that shadow is all wrong , that it should bend the other direction if it's made by the Earth....

 

But the shadow is not caused by the Earth .It's not a shadow at all , just the part of the moon the sun does not reach . It's what the moon looks like viewed from the side . Not easy to get your head around . So I got my torch  and found a ping pong ball ...

 

Hold the ball (moon) ,in your left hand , and the torch(sun) in your right , out in front of you so the ball , torch and your nose make an equal sided triangle . Now shine the torch on the ball , and you get the same image , the "shadow" looks like the one on the moon . 

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In this hi-rez view of the moon why are all the 'impacts' perfectly circular? That is the shape of a sinkhole and the far side of the moon should be littered with them simply because the core shifted to the side closest to the earth so the far side would be where the mass comes from to fill in the area left by the core as it is not an empty space.

The large on at 3:40 is a sink hole as shown by the cracking around the rim.

 

 

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On 1/8/2021 at 6:15 PM, oz93666 said:

 

It's good to ask these sort of questions ... Some might think the curve in that shadow is all wrong , that it should bend the other direction if it's made by the Earth....

 

But the shadow is not caused by the Earth .It's not a shadow at all , just the part of the moon the sun does not reach . It's what the moon looks like viewed from the side . Not easy to get your head around . So I got my torch  and found a ping pong ball ...

 

Hold the ball (moon) ,in your left hand , and the torch(sun) in your right , out in front of you so the ball , torch and your nose make an equal sided triangle . Now shine the torch on the ball , and you get the same image , the "shadow" looks like the one on the moon . 

You should be able to duplicate all the 'phases' from 'new' to full' an back

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