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Flicker from LED house lights


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I've recently been watching some funny animal clips on Youtube ... Very occasionally they slow the film down and it shows the flicker emanating from the lights people have in their house ...In this example , cued at the correct time , we see the flicker comes from the light in the hall behind the child . We can see it's still daylight outside , there is no flicker closest to the camera this light must come from outside daylight through a window behind the person filming ... At night the effect will be much greater with only led lights on .... flickering  light  such as this will have an effect on the brain and moods depending on the frequency ...No telling what it's doing to people ... What lights do you have ? 

 

 

 

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I remember watching a David Icke interview years ago. Not sure who was interviewing him, but it was in his flat. In the hallway he had a big stack of the old type bulbs. I have a few new type bulbs in , but the lamp next to where I sit most of the time has an old one, a pigmy 🙂

What type do you have OP?

Edited by BlueSky
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Old fashioned incandescent bulbs still flash at twice mains frequency. Thermal inertia makes it not quite so noticeable.

 

Time now for someone to wade into the thread and tell us all that the mains frequency  - and subsequently TV frame rates - were decided as best for mind control (they're not)   in some Deep Illuminati Plot, rather than having any grasp of power engineering or an understanding of persistence of vision...)

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7 hours ago, BlueSky said:

I remember watching a David Icke interview years ago. Not sure who was interviewing him, but it was in his flat. In the hallway he had a big stack of the old type bulbs. I have a few new type bulbs in , but the lamp next to where I sit most of the time has an old one, a pigmy 🙂

What type do you have OP?

 

In My jungle hide away I've  gone solar .... So the lighting is run on 24V DC .... led's are fine in their basic form , but for some unknown reason most led lights for mains have a flicker ( not mains frequency ) .... so do most quality touches , one press for full power (no flicker) , two press for dim which has flicker , then 3 clicks for strobe .... 

 

This is what I mostly use . Warm white self adhesive strip can be 12 or 24V .. cut to length required , being plugged directly into DC with no circuitry they don't flicker ... ideal for power cuts can be used with a 12V car battery and consume minimal power ...many colors available 

xMCRV6YQtbx87_JOj5DpRpaJuspdTwQSQlS3pw90

 

Best to arrange them like this , the light is aimed up to the ceiling and scatters back , looking directly at the strip is uncomfortable ...

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The flicker is definitely damaging to your mental state.  It interferes with consciousness somehow, I shall investigate next time.

In fact any artificial light does ... I often notice an instant change in mood when I put the lights on, so I try not to.

We are actually designed not to have electric lights and to function in the dark quite well.

Stress - that's what it is ... putting any lights on causes "stress" in the body.

I think I have no leds in the house actually, I notice flickering quite easily I suppose I am not a dull person who wouldn't notice.

In a subtle way human beings hate to be health and conscious so they collectively try to fuck things up and so it wouldn't surprise me if those who chose mains voltage did so because it was the least conscious frequency available - they would have done that instinctively.

Esoterically it is said that what we call electricity is a shortcircuting of the life energy of the universe ... it is very destructive and wastes the energetic reserve of the universe and very inefficient ... and bad for our health.   I am not sure what the total energy efficiency is from source to output ... not even sure where to find that information.  i.e. the total energy consumed by the input fuel to the total useful energy used at the output.

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@oz93666 Itsjay is correct. LEDs are usually driven by DC pulses even when powered by a DC supply. You can often see this in some car rear lights from a 12V supply and car battery. It's all related to efficiency and is especially useful in torches and cycle lamps to keep the brightness constant as the battery voltage falls.

But I guess all those claiming flicker is damaging are happy to sit in front of a  flickering computer screen even if it's not consciously perceived...

Edited by Janet W
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3 minutes ago, Janet W said:

@oz93666 Itsjay is correct. LEDs are usually driven by DC pulses even when powered by a DC supply. You can often see this in some car rear lights from a 12V supply and car battery. It's all related to efficiency and is especially useful in torches and cycle lamps to keep the brightness constant as the battery voltage falls.

But I guess all those claiming flicker is damaging are happy to sit in front of a  flickering computer screen even if it's not consciously perceived...

 

Yes ... my fault for saying " but for some unknown reason most led lights for mains have a flicker " ... we know the reason , the manufacturer has chosen the pulse method to power the led . They could have used this same method and put a capacitor across the LED to prevent flicker  ... or chosen a different technique to drive and dim the leds .... But for some unknown reason they decided to give us flicker ....

The secret government has put a lot of research into the effect of flicker , particularly the frequency used on TVs ... it's designed to calm and relax and make us more suggestible .... I remember a story Alex Jones tells of being shown around  a secret facility within a University ....  dozens of monkeys tied in chairs watching TV  

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LEDs if driven from a pulsed supply should have capacitors across them to eliminate (or at least reduce) flicker. But they are often omitted on cost grounds, and if the frequency is high enough no one will notice whether or not capacitors are used.

 

The frequency of flicker on TV is directly related to mains frequency and anyone knowing about TV transmission systems will know all about frame rates and varying mains frequency if they're not locked. Although this was the case for analogue TV, they're maintained with digital systems, although can be multiples; 100 Hz, 120 Hz, etc.

 

Mains frequency was chosen to be 50 Hz (60 Hz in the Americas) as a compromise between transmission efficiency, transformer size and efficiency, thermal inertia of incandescent bulbs (a major reason for the initial distribution of electricity) and the design of industrial electric motors. This was all well before anyone thought of TV, or Alex Jones and his TV-watching captive monkeys. (Which sounds to me like an Alex Jones evidence-free story!)

Edited by Janet W
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11 hours ago, Janet W said:

 This was all well before anyone thought of TV, or Alex Jones and his TV-watching captive monkeys. (Which sounds to me like an Alex Jones evidence-free story!)

 

AJ would never lie to us!  ... This incident reportedly happened in the 1990's  .... they could have been deciding which new flicker rate to push for the  LED screens they had in the pipe line then ....  ..... Or they could be putting a flicker on-top of the standard refresh  rate (flicker) that monitors and TV's  have ....With high flicker rates in modern TV's ...up to  240Hz  there is the increased possibility to flicker the TV signal going into the TV  , and nobody would notice ...consciously ....

 

There is no question unnoticed flicker does have an effect ranging from relaxation, increased suggestibility , anxiety , depending on frequency  ....

 

Pokemon seizures - Japan on December 16, 1997

 

In this incident, TV images with 12 Hz red/blue flicker provoked photosensitive seizures in a large number of children distributed over a wide area of Japan.

 

Twenty minutes into the episode, Pikachu stops "vaccine" missiles with his Thunderbolt attack, resulting in an explosion that flashes red and blue lights.[1][5] Although there were similar parts in the episode with red and blue flashes, two anime techniques, "paka paka"[a] and "flash" made the scene particularly intense.[2] These flashes were bright strobe lights, with blinks at a rate of about 12 Hz for approximately six seconds.[6]

At this point, some viewers experienced blurred vision, headaches, dizziness and nausea.[1][5][7] Some suffered seizures, blindness, convulsions and loss of consciousness.[1][5] Japan's Fire Defense Agency reported that 685 viewers – 310 boys and 375 girls – were taken to hospitals by ambulances.[5][8] Although many victims recovered during the ambulance trip, more than 150 were admitted to hospitals.[5][8] Two were hospitalized for more than two weeks.[8] Some had seizures when parts of the scene were rebroadcast during news reports on the seizures.[7] Only a small fraction of the 685 children treated were diagnosed with photosensitive epilepsy.[9] The incident was referred to as "Pokémon Shock" (ポケモンショック, Pokémon Shokku) by the Japanese press.[10]

Later studies showed that 5–10% of the viewers had mild symptoms that did not need hospital treatment.[6] Twelve thousand children who were not sent to hospital reported mild symptoms of illness; however, their symptoms more closely resembled mass hysteria than a grand mal seizure.....https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dennō_Senshi_Porygon

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The Pokemon effects were real but due to programme content, and not the deliberate selection of TV frame/field rates. Programme makers are normally aware of the problems caused by flickering images. That's why a warning (in the UK at least) is often given before clips contain lots of photo flashes.

 

So yes, mass-induced fitting could theoretically be induced by flicker rates below frame rates (the exact susceptibility rates vary, but 10 to 20 Hz is most common), but if The Evil Powers That Be got into the TV transmission system it wouldn't affect all viewers anyway. And they'd also need to get into all TV channels. Maybe pulsing a nation's mains electricity supply at say 12 Hz would be much more effective. Now, that's an interesting engineering challenge...

Edited by Janet W
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