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27 things to consider for survival


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It's only a matter of a few months ago when everything was normal (well more accurately, what we perceived of as normal). Since then the world has been turned on it's head, and the new normal is chaos. We have no idea what the situation will be in two months, let alone two years. The one thing we can now be sure of is that we can be sure of nothing! We know that we can't be dependent on any part of the establishment to be looking out for us, so we need to look out for ourselves.
Irrespective of what's coming down the road, whether it be vaccines, blanket 5G, food shortages, insect-burgers, lock downs, shut downs, or whatever, we need to be prepared as much as we can. We cannot prepare for every eventuality, nobody can, but we can at least give ourselves a chance. The more control we have over our own food, the less the establishment have of controlling us.
"Hope for the best, but prepare for the worst"
With that in mind I've made a list of some things others might like to consider. Obviously I'm not suggesting anyone should do all of these things, but there may be something on this list where someone might think "I might try that" or whatever.
So I'll just throw it out there...


1. Move Rural: Yes I know it's impossible for some and impractical for others but if it's any way feasible I think everyone should at least consider the possibility. The advantages are numerous....grow your own food, better quality of life, more freedom etc. We know they want to herd everyone into large cities, but avoiding that means they have less control over our daily lives which is always a plus.
Also in times of turmoil and concern being surrounded by the natural world keeps us more grounded, although in my case that's debatable.

 

2. Grow Your Own Food. Even if not living in the countryside most people still have a possibility of growing something, whether it be in a garden, on a patio, or even in a window box. It may not provide you with ample food but at least you can learn the basics of growing because there is a learning curve involved and it may give you a head start for the future. 

 

3. Learn A New Skill (or skills preferably). We now live in a society where the vast majority of people can only do the one thing they were trained to do, yet we've seen in the last few months how fragile and precarious that society can be. Down the line there may come a time where the ones who fix your stuff may not be available, or you may not have the funds to pay them. Can you do basic plumbing or carpentry? Can you fix things or make things? You may even be able to barter your skills for something you need in a dysfunctioning future.

 

4. Water. I won't go into the obvious about how vital clean water is, but everyone should familiarise themselves with storing water, purification etc. etc.
Admittedly I haven't explored this myself because I have my own clean water source but if I hadn't this would be the first thing I'd be reading up on.

 

5. Be Debt Free. I'm not being flippant because I know this is an impossibility for a large section of the population. However having large debt is one of the main strangleholds they have over you, so any reduction of debt is a bonus, however small. Try and avoid increasing your debt, and if possible look for ways of reducing it. 
Is now a good time to change that car, buy that appliance or get that upgrade?
If it entails taking on more debt, probably not.

 

6. A Second Freezer. Previously I had expressed concerns about this in case there were power outages, however on reflection I don't think this will be a problem because they need the terror-visions and phones operational in order to continue with the fear and propaganda (there were lots of meat plants closing due to the 'virus' but I didn't hear of any power plants closing?). The freezer is probably the easiest medium term food storage option, and during a further lockdown would be ideal for storing those staples like milk and bread which eliminates the need to have to shop.

 

7. Canned Goods. A lot of people are brain-dead and try to buy during a panic, then forget all about it once the panic is over and presume normality is back forever. We buy during normality to save us having to buy during a panic....right?
Canned foods may not be the most nutritious in the world, but are better than no food.
They're cheap and plentiful right now, easy to store, have a long shelf life, and can typically be used 3-4 years after their BB date which means they could last eight years or more. Keep a rotating stock during the 'normal' times by using the oldest and replenishing with new stock.
Find a cool, dry, dark place in your home, stick a couple of shelves up and fill them  for a rainy day. Tinned fish, stews and meats are handy to have.

 

8. Grains. These are cheap and plentiful and have a long shelf life if stored properly.
White rice and rolled oats for example have a shelf life of around 20 years if kept in airtight containers (I know some here don't agree about the benefits of white rice but I still think having at least some rice is desirable). 

 

9. Dehydrating. I'm only starting out in this area of preserving food but the benefits of it are medium to long term storage, most of the nutrients preserved, reduced storage area, and easy to rehydrate by simply adding water. There's an initial outlay involved (I paid £170 for a ten tray version with timer and temperature control) but if you grow your own food you can dehydrate any excess, or you can buy food cheaply when in season and preserve. Fruit and veg can be dehydrated on almost any unit and if you but one with the proper temperature settings you can even dehydrate meats. There's also a great video put up here which shows how to vacuum seal ziplock bags using a bucket of water.

 

10. Pickling/Preserving. I readily admit to knowing nothing about this, however it's something I plan on researching and trying in the near future as another way of preserving food. 

 

11. First Aid. Every home should have a proper first aid kit and the ability to use it. 
However I have to hold my hands up and say that I'm guilty here too. All I have is your typical first aid 'box' and sketchy knowledge so it's something I need to address, but any home with children should definitely have one. We already saw how the hospitals were messed up during the 'pandemic'.

 

12. Medication. I'm not on any prescription medication but those who are should explore the possibility of having a stock in reserve if they can. I am however blind as a bat without glasses and anyone in the same position should have at least one working pair of glasses in reserve if not more. A good supply of painkillers and possibly antibiotics (if you can get them) would be very important also.

 

13. Other Foodstuffs. These are things we use on a regular basis but cannot supply for ourselves, most of which come from afar and were considered valuable commodities in bygone days before mass transit. But who's to say that transit will be operational?
I'm thinking things like coffee, tea, salt, pepper, spices, sugar

 

14. Food Storage. There is little point in storing food if it's not stored properly, so things like airtight glass jars and BPA free containers are a must. Also consider some silica gel moisture absorbing sachets and ziplock type freezer bags, and also some larger plastic boxes to keep it all in and keep  creatures like mice and insects at bay. 

 

15. Cash. You should always have some cash on hand in case there's an issue with the plastic (computers down?) or there's a problem refilling the cash machines (virus?).
However cash is only valuable so long as people have faith in it, so should a SHTF situation ever become reality (see below) it could turn out to be worthless virtually overnight. In that situation precious metals such as gold and silver would come into their own, but most people can't afford to hoard gold or silver bullion.
There is the possibility of bartering though (see below).

The following are more for SHTF type scenarios, where the grid is down and society itself begins to disintegrate. It may seem highly unlikely and it probably is, but then again so was the twin towers attack. The only thing we know is that the cabal is capable of absolutely anything, and if it facilitates total control and martial law introduction, well.... 
I'd like to preface this part by saying that I'm going to be mentioning a few brand names here. I have no affiliation with or receive any remuneration from any brand, and these are just my personal opinions.

 

16. Solar Power/Generator. Well where I live solar power would be next to useless considering the sun hasn't shone for the last two months of "summer", however in sunnier climes it could prove invaluable. I'm a bit on the fence regarding generators because the fuel most use (petrol/diesel) only have a shelf life of around six months.
So I would a) have to know when the situation was deteriorating and b) hope that fuel supplies were going to remain available during SHTF (not likely).


17. Books. The internet might be good for researching things, but what if the power is down?  Some actual books which don't rely on power might be a good idea.
I would suggest having a good book on some of the following might prove useful:
Self-sufficiency, Alternative Medicine, Foraging, First Aid, Practical DIY
 
18. Heat. Most of us need heat in wintertime yet most are depending on supplies from (usually foreign) suppliers (gas, oil) or on electricity. Those that are might consider a dual heating system with solid fuel  where one of the suppliers is local or national (logs, turf or coal?), or at least having an open fire or log burner as backup.

 

19. Cooking. Similar to "Heat" above most have a single source for cooking with the same issue of supply over which they have no control. Although having a solid fuel range which can both cook and heat I've also invested in a "Bushbox", a small collapsible outdoor stove which can boil a kettle or pot with just a handful of dry sticks (I haven't received it yet so can't comment on it's usability, however a totally self sufficient method of cooking is appealing).

 

20. Self Protection. Depending on where you live and the current laws this is variable. However in a situation where society is not functioning some form of protection is necessary. You may live in US where a firearm is a commonplace item or you may live elsewhere where the laws forbid ownership. A good hunting knife is a valuable asset with a number of uses such as gutting fish, splitting firewood and even opening cans. Only you can decide what is your best protection given your location and laws.

 

21. Tools. Power tools are great, unless of course when they've no power in which case they're useless. Every home should have a selection of hand tools. If you have a garden you probably already have a spade, fork and hoe, but other necessities should include a hammer, pliers, screwdriver set, spanner set, hatchet, axe, saw and bow saw.
That way you're not depending on power to  repair things about the house, source wood and chop sticks.

 

22. Proper Clothing. Proper footwear and clothing is not important, it's vital. Without it you run the risk of becoming ill, which can be lethal in a grid down situation. You need to be dry, warm and comfortable. Style and fashion doesn't exist anymore, being replaced with practicality and durability. I've had some experience in this area recently, and I'll give you some of my personal preferences (this is where I mention brand names).
Footwear: For a combination of price, dryness and comfort I prefer the Karrimor brand. They retail around £40-£50 and given the price range I find them very good.
Some decent socks are also a requirement and I personally wear a brand called Yuedge (5 pairs for £20) which I find breathable, hard wearing and comfortable.
Rainwear: I've tried lots of different brands over the last number of years  and the brand I've found best for rain and wind protection combined with breathability  is Jack Wolfskin. They're not cheap (I think I paid around €250 for a long jacket with removable fleece) but they're hands down the best IMO.
Trousers: I practically live in my Fjallraven trousers (£100-£140 average). I have about 5 pairs that I rotate and aside from going somewhere 'dressy' they're my go to.
They're hard wearing and durable, have loads of secure pockets and are comfortable.
They're not waterproof but dry out quickly (way faster than any denim) and combined with a decent pair of waterproof leggings I find them ideal.
Hats: For all round bushcraft type hats I'd recommend a Tilley (around £80). They give excellent sun protection and will keep you dry in a shower (however they wouldn't keep you dry in 'all day' rain). Another hat I'd recommend is a beanie type hat called Sealskinz (around £20) which is an excellent cold weather/rainproof hat.
Fleeces/Warmth: My personal preference would be Wolfskin, Columbia and Craighoppers but you'll have to decide yourself. However I would suggest some thermal vests are also a good investment.

 

23. Alcohol. Whether you drink or not alcohol is still worth having as spirits keep forever and would be a good item to barter if nothing else. In a grid down situation there will be a lot of doom and gloom about and a glass of something might raise the spirits a bit (no pun intended) even if only temporarily. If like me you're partial to a glass of wine you may consider learning to ferment your own wine? All you need is water, sugar, yeast and some patience combined with what nature provides  (dandelion, nettle, blackberry or elderflower) to make wine. It could be another barter item too.

 

24. Light. Putting aside some long life candles (90 hour burn time) to have for power outages (or possibly longer spells) would be a good idea. Winters are long enough without the necessity of sitting in the dark from 4pm each evening. For seeing where you're walking outside a wind up torch might be an option, although how durable they actually are remains to be seen.

 

25. Bartering. In a grid down situation this could be the new currency. Aside from the obvious items such as food, other things which could be of high barter value may be:
medications, alcohol, tobacco, lighters, spices, fuel, coffee, tea, growing seeds, honey, vitamins, gold and silver. And if you have a particular skill that could bartered for too.

 

26. Hunting/Fishing. To those that have the required equipment and skill set, this could be a game changer. I have fished quite a bit but don't have the equipment any more. Also most of my fishing  was in the sea and I'm too far from the sea now. I've never hunted. Neither of these skills can be learned overnight, so I would imagine that both these skills are outside the scope of a lot of people.

 

27. Bugging Out. This is essentially a last ditch attempt for survival and freedom in a situation where you must leave your home and basically go "rogue", living off the land as best you can. It certainly wouldn't be for everyone. Given the option of living in a dystopian society in some high rise hell and barely existing and the possibility of having my brain rewired to AI, I would choose rogue. One of the first things to identify is a location which is unpopulated and secluded, and if possible bury some food there in a number of different locations. Then you have to consider your equipment such as a tent, sleeping bag, cooking utensils etc. which should be light and easily transportable. It's really too much to go into here and hopefully it never reaches that stage, but it is a possibility.

 

Anyway, I hope there's some food for thought here for someone. I've probably omitted lots of stuff but it's all I could think of for now. We all hope none of this comes to pass but unfortunately I think some of it may now that the lunatics appear to have taken over the asylum. 
If you have any comments, suggestions or criticisms feel free to post.

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3 minutes ago, Storm in the garden said:

5. Be Debt Free. I'm not being flippant because I know this is an impossibility for a large section of the population. However having large debt is one of the main strangleholds they have over you, so any reduction of debt is a bonus, however small. Try and avoid increasing your debt, and if possible look for ways of reducing it. 
Is now a good time to change that car, buy that appliance or get that upgrade?
If it entails taking on more debt, probably not.

 

6. A Second Freezer. Previously I had expressed concerns about this in case there were power outages, however on reflection I don't think this will be a problem because they need the terror-visions and phones operational in order to continue with the fear and propaganda (there were lots of meat plants closing due to the 'virus' but I didn't hear of any power plants closing?). The freezer is probably the easiest medium term food storage option, and during a further lockdown would be ideal for storing those staples like milk and bread which eliminates the need to have to shop.

 

7. Canned Goods. A lot of people are brain-dead and try to buy during a panic, then forget all about it once the panic is over and presume normality is back forever. We buy during normality to save us having to buy during a panic....right?
Canned foods may not be the most nutritious in the world, but are better than no food.
They're cheap and plentiful right now, easy to store, have a long shelf life, and can typically be used 3-4 years after their BB date which means they could last eight years or more. Keep a rotating stock during the 'normal' times by using the oldest and replenishing with new stock.
Find a cool, dry, dark place in your home, stick a couple of shelves up and fill them  for a rainy day. Tinned fish, stews and meats are handy to have.

 

5. Or learn how to use your rights to put your debt down low.

6. But don't rely on freezing - like you say, power cuts but also if one has to run for it you're not taking that bag of frozen peas.

7. Yes and bear in mind there is a shortage of aluminium and tin for making cans at the moment so these are going to disappear. I went to my wholesaler to stock up the other day and could only get tomatoes and baked beans in bulk. No chickpeas, no kidney beans etc. I might have to make multiple visits to multiple stores, Good job I don't wear a mask or it would be hard work.

 

Great list, thanks.

 

I would add;

 

sprouting seeds. They're brilliant survival food and many can be eaten as seed (very wasteful), as sprouts (excellent nutrition in just a couple of days), or even grown on to full sized plants - I've got red cabbage, snow pea and kohl rabbi growing full sized from sprouting seeds.

 

And as far as growing goes it's possible to grow seed from food you bought to eat. My personal favourite is peppers, especially chilies, but I also have tomatoes, courgette and some kind of squash growing from food seeds. I've got about a hundred butternut squash seeds from one squash - now eaten. Think about it. If I was to grow all of those seeds on successfully I'd have at least a hundred squashes from the one I bought.

 

I use a Berky water filter and have the 'sport' version too.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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10 minutes ago, Nobby Noboddy said:

5. Or learn how to use your rights to put your debt down low.

6. But don't rely on freezing - like you say, power cuts but also if one has to run for it you're not taking that bag of frozen peas.

7. Yes and bear in mind there is a shortage of aluminium and tin for making cans at the moment so these are going to disappear. I went to my wholesaler to stock up the other day and could only get tomatoes and baked beans in bulk. No chickpeas, no kidney beans etc. I might have to make multiple visits to multiple stores, Good job I don't wear a mask or it would be hard work.

 

5. You mean we have rights?

6. Yeah, in a bug out situation pretty useless alright, but in a bug out situation we're really on the ropes aren't we? Just hope it doesn't come to that.

7. Wow, that's the first time I've heard of this. Haven't done a shop in a while but everything was fine last time. Might hit the shops tomorrow to check.😮

 

16 minutes ago, Nobby Noboddy said:

sprouting seeds. They're brilliant survival food and many can be eaten as seed (very wasteful), as sprouts (excellent nutrition in just a couple of days), or even grown on to full sized plants - I've got red cabbage, snow pea and kohl rabbi growing full sized from sprouting seeds.

 

Yep a good one, I'd forgotten about those. Don't mention kohl rabb though, I must have tried growing them about six times. Every time the get to about 2 inches and something devours the leaves. 

23 minutes ago, Nobby Noboddy said:

And as far as growing goes it's possible to grow seed from food you bought to eat. My personal favourite is peppers, especially chilies, but I also have tomatoes, courgette and some kind of squash growing from food seeds. I've got about a hundred butternut squash seeds from one squash - now eaten. Think about it. If I was to grow all of those seeds on successfully I'd have at least a hundred squashes from the one I bought.

 

I saw a video on how to germinate tomato seeds that way a while back. I was going to give it a go  this summer but the weather has been so bad this year that they wouldn't have stood a chance. Water cress is the only thing that might do well, or maybe I should try a paddy field.

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Most basic thing about debt is (in law) there are two levels; 1 = mortgage, rent, utilities etc, 2 = credit, loans, HP etc.

If you have ANY level 1 debt the level 2 creditors can go do one. So in my own case I made sure I was a little behind with my mortgage and then cut my own deal of - no interest, no phone calls and I pay a nominal 'good faith' payment of £2 a month (he he). It's now £5 a month but only because one of them (out of 6, count them, 6 credit cards) decided to try and take me to court. After nine months and quite a lot of hassle they ended up with another £3 pounds. It cost me a little bit to initiate a counter claim but otherwise I'm happy with the result.

 

I started small preparations and thinking about the bug-out and I could do it. Unfortunately I live in the UK and there is little if no wilderness. In the woods somewhere I suppose.

 

My Kohl Rabbi have split, I think through lack of water. I'll still eat them though. Getting spinach, peas, broad, runner and french beans, courgettes and chillies from the garden at the moment, yum just had a fresh veg curry.

 

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This is a very useful and informative thread, thanks Storm. The only things I can think to add would be if people find themselves stuck in a city when the SHTF, it would be beneficial to form a group with all the neighbours, to share, barter and help each other against adversity, there's strength in numbers.

As we don't know how long our existing currency will be of any value, a good use of redundancy payments, (or perhaps pooling monetary resources in a group) would be to buy some land and start growing fruit trees, cane fruits and herbs, so again in a SHTF scenario, you will have somewhere to escape with family and friends to start an off-grid community. And don't take any smart tech with you ;)

 

Also I noticed I had 4 unexpected tomato plants this year growing in the veg bed. They must have self seeded from last year's tomatoes that fell on the ground, so no effort required!

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It is amazing how we forget that our own food produces seeds. I often plant potatoes,  just ordinary supermarket ones, that have started to sprout eyes. Also as you say chillies and tomatoes. I'm going to try saving some of my marrow seeds but I'm told squashes don't grow well from seed as they cross fertilise and might taste bitter. 

 

Also Asian food supermarkets for dried beans and pulses are still excellent. Kidney beans getting rarer than hens teeth in cans but still available dried. 

 

 

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19 hours ago, Nobby Noboddy said:

Most basic thing about debt is (in law) there are two levels; 1 = mortgage, rent, utilities etc, 2 = credit, loans, HP etc.

If you have ANY level 1 debt the level 2 creditors can go do one. So in my own case I made sure I was a little behind with my mortgage and then cut my own deal of - no interest, no phone calls and I pay a nominal 'good faith' payment of £2 a month (he he). It's now £5 a month but only because one of them (out of 6, count them, 6 credit cards) decided to try and take me to court. After nine months and quite a lot of hassle they ended up with another £3 pounds. It cost me a little bit to initiate a counter claim but otherwise I'm happy with the result

 

I haven't a clue what you're talking about Nobby but it sounds like you have a nice little system worked out, a sort of "screwing the system by using the system" type thing😁

 

1 hour ago, Lore said:

This is a very useful and informative thread, thanks Storm. The only things I can think to add would be if people find themselves stuck in a city when the SHTF, it would be beneficial to form a group with all the neighbours, to share, barter and help each other against adversity, there's strength in numbers.

As we don't know how long our existing currency will be of any value, a good use of redundancy payments, (or perhaps pooling monetary resources in a group) would be to buy some land and start growing fruit trees, cane fruits and herbs, so again in a SHTF scenario, you will have somewhere to escape with family and friends to start an off-grid community. And don't take any smart tech with you 😉

 

Good points. Traditionally people have banded together when faced with adversity, like in the great depression for example. However it remains to be seen, because these days a large proportion seem to be focused solely on themselves. Hopefully when consumerism begins to crumble people will refocus and get back to the important stuff.

 

1 hour ago, kj35 said:

It is amazing how we forget that our own food produces seeds. I often plant potatoes,  just ordinary supermarket ones, that have started to sprout eyes. Also as you say chillies and tomatoes. I'm going to try saving some of my marrow seeds but I'm told squashes don't grow well from seed as they cross fertilise and might taste bitter. 

 

I can go one better. I just cut slivers out where the eyes were, left them on the windowsill and ate the potatoes. Late spring I planted those shriveled slivers in a bed and they all took, and are about waist high now? 

Last season I had a raised bed of early and red mizuna and some giant orach. Some were going to seed so I dug up the bed and covered it to suppress weeds. A few weeks ago I uncovered the bed an bedded in some plug plants. The giant orach and both varities of mizuna have all returned themselves in between the plug plants, and there's two 3ft high giant orachs growing with the potatoes about 20 feet away! Some things just won't grow no matter how much attention and care I give them, while others won't stop growing. Earlier this year I had 3 giant parsley plants growing by themselves on the tarmac?

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just thought I'd drop in a few updates in case anyone is interested...

 

1. I would NOT now recommend the Karrimor footwear. I put on a pair recently and noticed that the toes were separating from the soles! I only have them around 9 months and while they had some wear initially I haven't been wearing them much recently so that's pretty poor usage. The older Karrimor were excellent but like most things the quality seems to be dropping. Keeping feet dry and warm is essential but seems to be problematic in practice. I've tried both average priced wellingtons (Dunlop) and expensive (Barbour) and both leaked after a while. I'm after ordering a pair of leather Timberland boots and some dubbin and I'll see how they fare out, but if anyone has any suggestions please comment.

 

2. I tried out the Bushbox collapsible stove and it's excellent. A cotton ball rubbed in Vaseline and a few twigs, one strike of the fire stick and you have an independent cooking medium. It does require attention because you have to "feed it" sticks, but after 7 minutes I had a pot of boiling water.It comes folded flat in it's own pouch and is set up or folded away in a matter of seconds.  I found that knowing  you have the ability to cook anywhere and be  totally independent of anyone or anything using essentially free fuel very liberating.

 

3. The "bucket of water" method of vacuum sealing is not as easy as it appears. It is VERY easy for water to get into the bag you're trying to seal, thus rendering the whole dehydrating process compromised. I personally won't be using that method again.

 

4. If you're looking for an all round general purpose utility knife, I would highly recommend the Norakniv. I purchased one recently and was very impressed. Not a hunting knife as such but very useful to have. They're made in Sweden with a stainless steel blade, and for a combination of quality, versatility and value (around £14)  they're hard to beat.

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1 hour ago, Mr H said:

Thank you so much for the information on this thread. It's really helpful.

 

I hate to be critical when the title of this thread seems so promising ... but most information here is irrelevant and off target ....

 

We are not going camping ! ...It's not that type of survival .... footwear  ? collapsible stove ? vacum sealing ? utility knife ??? 

 

What exactly are we preparing for??? ..A time when you maybe quarantined in your flat ... or when the economy has collapsed and food prices are high ...perhaps  looters have taken out supermarkets and food is scarce .....

 

So really it's about food ... and when you are hungry you won't be to picky .... This has all been sorted out by the previous generation , see "Survival into the 21st century" an excellent book ..

Sprouts are the most nutritious and cheapest food ... mung beans even taste good when sprouted ...1kg of seeds  ... turns into 5kg of mung sprouts after 2 days watering  ..( put them in a plastic water bottle and rinse twice a day .... these alone would keep you alive ... alfalfa , sunflower seeds (with hulls) taste good when sprouted , and are very cheap and are highest in nutrition ....

dried figs , dates , dried bananas dried apples pears ...baked beans ....

 

Latter I might make a thread on how to make a tazer shock walking stick from parts brought on ebay for $10 it will keep knife wielding looters at bay .It's a stick a meter long contains a circuit and battery , the dangerous end has wires running down the length , anyone coming into contact with these gets a serious jolt 

This is the circuit module $4 ebay ..runs on batteries 

s-l225.webp

 

 

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1 hour ago, oz93666 said:

We are not going camping ! ...It's not that type of survival .... footwear  ? collapsible stove ? vacum sealing ? utility knife ???

 

Interesting, you appear to know what type of survival it is going to be?

Now I don't know where you live, but where I live it rains a lot and it's cold a lot, so yes keeping your feet dry and warm is a very important element of survival in adverse conditions.

If you don't look after your feet you won't be walking around too long with your zapper stick, you'll be immobile.

 

Collapsible stove? Yep why not? Easy to set up and take down, fuel is free, no dependence on utilities, can be easily carried in a bug out situation, ability to have hot food on a cold day etc. etc. In  cold weather the ability to cook also has a positive psychological effect. 

 

Vacuum sealing? Just a way to preserve dried food over a long period, with minimal weight and size. I don't know what you think your " dried bananas dried apples pears" are if not fruit that's been dehydrated and vacuum sealed.

 

Utility knife??? I'd be interested in how you plan to open your tin of baked beans using a tazer? Or make kindling, or gut fish, or cut anything?

 

I'm not saying your zapper is a bad idea, but how long does the battery last? Do you carry spare batteries? Will they hold their charge? If the wiring breaks can you strip the cable, because you don't have a knife or access to fire apparently. My hatchet will still be a hatchet in five years, and if our paths should cross and a situation arises, my bet would be on the guy with the hatchet over the zapper guy. Your zapper has one use only which is personal protection, other than that it is useless. My hatchet has many uses one of which is personal protection, and even judged on that one area alone I believe it would be superior.

 

You seem to be adopting a specific plan for a specific scenario when there are a multitude of possible scenarios, ranging from having to queue to get food and occasional utilities failure to full blown armageddon where society has completely imploded. How do you know your one possibility is the right possibility?

Apparently your sole strategy seems to suggest walking around an urban wasteland (possibly barefoot?) with a pocketful of sprouting seeds, another pocketful of baked beans and a zapper stick to protect them? And as a matter of interest, where do you get the clean water to  rinse your sprouting seeds twice a day in this scenario?

 

My intention was to put information out there which may be helpful in various different situations which we may face going forward. Others can take what they choose from it, or otherwise. I believe that the ability to grow your own food is a plus, to have proper footwear (especially where I live in northern Europe) is extremely important, to have access to clean water is vital. A supply of food, a means to cook independently, a way to protect yourself, hand tools....all these things are necessary in my view.

If you feel that all you need is a pocketful of seeds and a battery operated stick to survive, well that's your belief and your choice. Good luck, because I believe you're going to need it

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8 minutes ago, Storm in the garden said:

 

Interesting, you appear to know what type of survival it is going to be?

Now I don't know where you live, but where I live it rains a lot and it's cold a lot, so yes keeping your feet dry and warm is a very important element of survival in adverse conditions.

If you don't look after your feet you won't be walking around too long with your zapper stick, you'll be immobile.

..

 

  I don't imagine people will be walking anywhere ... they may not be allowed out ... why would you want to go out in times of lawlessness and collapse ??? 

 

Too many movies have got people thinking in terms of a nomadic existence during a collapse .... this is not realistic ... you stay put in the flat you live in now , and you last as long as your food supply .... 

 

It's not realistic to try to grow food , hungry hands will grab it one night while you sleep . 

 

Zapper powered by rechargeable 18650's , these power head lamps , recharged by mains or small $10 solar panel

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, shadowmoon said:

Defend your home  - defend yourself..

 

Learning how to create your own weapons using everyday materials is a handy skill that will serve you well in a crisis. There is no telling where you will be when SHTF,

https://www.jbbardot.com/create-6-diy-weapons-from-everyday-materials-for-protection-and-survival-when-the-shtf/

 

Seriously mean shit , and bad karma .......hyrochloric acid bombs,  home made napalm  ,  catapults and axes  all these are very dangerous for the user and not appropriate...

 

Realistically you will need to defend yourself from home invaders ... kids with knives looking for food , already broken  into  your flat , a confined space ....  a zapper stick is the ideal weapon , it won't harm them in any way , just send them running . 

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7 minutes ago, oz93666 said:

 I don't imagine people will be walking anywhere ... they may not be allowed out ... why would you want to go out in times of lawlessness and collapse ??? 

 

This is what I mean, you're only looking at this from one perspective....yours.    For example.....

I live rural, so who's going to stop me or even see me? Nobody. I know where there's ample firewood within walking distance, so I would be going out.

 

14 minutes ago, oz93666 said:

.... this is not realistic ... you stay put in the flat you live in now , and you last as long as your food supply .... 

 

Again, you have no idea whether it is realistic or not, you're just guessing. I don't live in a flat and most likely wouldn't be staying put either.

 

 

16 minutes ago, oz93666 said:

 

It's not realistic to try to grow food , hungry hands will grab it one night while you sleep

 

What I grow is not visible from the road so who's to know I grow food? Also, I have dogs which alert me if anyone comes within 100 yards of the house.

 

 

20 minutes ago, oz93666 said:

 

Zapper powered by rechargeable 18650's , these power head lamps , recharged by mains or small $10 solar panel

 

The likelihood in the scenario you refer to is that the mains may not be working. I have one of those solar 18650 chargers and it takes a minimum of  two days to charge a single 18650. However you may live in a sunnier area than I do. Either way I not be confident having a fully charged zapper if faced by someone wielding a hatchet.

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Storm in the garden said:

 

This is what I mean, you're only looking at this from one perspective....yours.    For example.....

I live rural, so who's going to stop me or even see me? Nobody. I know where there's ample firewood within walking distance, so I would be going out.

 

I live in a remote Jungle /farm environment in Thailand .. so none of the advice I give applies to me ...I chose this place because food grows wild without help ..coconuts , bananas etc I have a big solid underground shelter ..

 

But I know from comments that most people live in populated areas ... growing food is not realistic ... stockpiling is the only solution , to buy time . ...

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1 hour ago, oz93666 said:

 

Seriously mean shit , and bad karma .......hyrochloric acid bombs,  home made napalm  ,  catapults and axes  all these are very dangerous for the user and not appropriate...

 

Realistically you will need to defend yourself from home invaders ... kids with knives looking for food , already broken  into  your flat , a confined space ....  a zapper stick is the ideal weapon , it won't harm them in any way , just send them running . 

 

they F*** with me or my family and they get F****d back.

Karma doesn't even enter into it.

You may not like it but its how I stand

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14 minutes ago, oz93666 said:

I live in a remote Jungle /farm environment in Thailand

 

Then you of all people should be aware that there is no "one size fits all" solution to planning for the future?

Which is why I said at the outset of this thread....

On 7/30/2020 at 7:43 PM, Storm in the garden said:

Obviously I'm not suggesting anyone should do all of these things, but there may be something on this list where someone might think "I might try that" or whatever.
So I'll just throw it out there...

 

Yes a lot of people live in populated areas but a percentage of those would have gardens, so there are options for growing. 

I had another look at my list and even considering only the people who live in flats/apartments there are still 15-20 of the 27 subjects which might be applicable.

It's a list of topics and information where people can pick and choose subject to their circumstances. That was the whole idea of it.

But to essentially suggest that people should only concern themselves with sprouting seeds and a tazer stick and that the rest is irrelevant is unhelpful.

Some might consider the seeds and zapper is ideal for their circumstances, whereas others might consider a firebox a good thing to have.

Nothing wrong with adding those options to the list, but my issue was that you appeared to be discounting everything else, whereas lots of suggestions apply to lots of situations.

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7 hours ago, shadowmoon said:

 

they F*** with me or my family and they get F****d back.

Karma doesn't even enter into it.

You may not like it but its how I stand

 

Karma aside , these weapons are not appropriate for what's ahead ...  In all certainty you will not be out in a field taking on people , but in your flat ... throwing hydrochloric acid around ?? Napalm ??? lol ...give me a break it will get you too! ... Even a knife or sword  is a bad idea ... most people will shrink from using them ,  your flat will be a bloody mess , you will have bodies to dispose of , and the "authorities" if active will not like you doing this.....

 

A zapper (cattle prod) is ideal ... this can also be designed to protect an area with wires , like an electric fence.

 

 

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7 hours ago, Storm in the garden said:

 

Then you of all people should be aware that there is no "one size fits all" solution to planning for the future?

Which is why I said at the outset of this thread....

 

Yes a lot of people live in populated areas but a percentage of those would have gardens, so there are options for growing. 

 

Forget growing , if you live in a populated area ..... We are only thinking of growing because the supermarkets are empty ! And in that case hungry people will grab your growing food in the night!

 

Those living in the countryside  , like you , can grow ... but you should have already figured out you need a good pair of shoes , and a good knife ...

Collapsible cooking stove ? twigs and a fire stick ??? why will you be cooking outside ???? presumably you live in a dwelling now , cook inside now ... why change that?? 

 

I would advise everyone to buy a bag of mung beans ... NOW  ... experiment with sprouting them ... put 2 inches of seeds in the bottom of a plastic water bottle , soak for 3 hours then drain and rinse often , they will expand and grow .Don't grow too long , only 1 or 2 days ... This is the ultimate healthy food 

 

1Kg of seeds is very cheap and will feed you for a week goes down well with  with bread and baked beans  ...

 

71831Or9yeL._AC_SL1500_.jpg

 

 

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Funnily enough I buy a lot of my food in bulk from that buywholefoodsonline above ^ - I usually eat rice, pasta, lentils, chick peas, split peas, beans, nuts, oats etc, calorie dense food, easy to store and lasts a good amount of time - growing some veg would be ideal for more vitamins and minerals though... say I ran out of food in a years time, and organic companies like that weren’t around, then there would be a tricky situation, I don’t know how bad things will get though 

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Just now, Seeker said:

- growing some veg would be ideal for more vitamins and minerals though...

 

Sprouting is the ideal solution for this Seeker ... it gives all the natural vitamins and minerals much more so than veg , and without the growing problem...

 

Sunflower seeds with husks (available in some pet food shops)  these taste the best , husks come off in sprouting 

Dried peas ...mung , and alfalfa ... 

 

Sprouts are full of prana , the ultimate energy and health food ... obviously , it's the seed just bursting into life ... I used to eat only this stuff ..but the habit slipped 

 

So not only can you feed yourself for a fraction of the cost , but you will be much healthier .... Bring it on NWO! 

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Mmmm. Alfalfa 🙂

Another few Suggestions:

Keep maps handy (and learn how to read them)!

Get familiar with the vegetation and wildlife of your region. 

Learn to use the Sun and stars for Navigation- It's embarrassing to not know where North is without a compass, isn't it?

 

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