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** note: below by @Nobby Noboddy   I propose a place for sharing books etc., that would be suitable for the more tender members of our families, friends, neighbours etc. I have found with D

Here are 25 pdf's (or links to them anyway) which are all about vaccinations and the effects of .... which I 'fell' upon! This would be the first link and from there you can view each book. https:

I haven't read it myself yet but 'The Poisoned Needle' by Eleanor McBean is an oft cited book, written in 1957, examining the "increasing flood of evidence against vaccination" and the "false germ the

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A few random ones:

I'm halfway through this one between Russell Brand and Eckhart Tolle: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6EwzvKF-o_Y&t=3242s

So far, he's saying exactly what David says. Look out for when he mentions the "Phantom Self".

 

I saw this one from Infinite Waters on Saturday morning and it really set me up for the day: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1sFXsGIPDgo

 

Being tempted to spend my Amazon voucher on Inner Engineering by Sadghuru but it'll take me until Christmas before I get the time to read it (I'm currently working my way through David's back catalogue).

 

The Invisible Rainbow (Arthur Firstenburg) - look out for the last page of the chapter about Influenza.

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Went through a few more boxes in the attic today, here's what I found.

 

My parents were obsessed with Egypt. They brought these three Egypt books back in the 80's. My dad was big into Carlos Castaneda too.

 

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I opened up more boxes in the attic today and found these gems.

 

Notice the book, Holy Blood, Holy Grail, which is the book that William Cooper recommended in his book, Behold a Pale Horse. I was so happy to see this book, I cannot wait to read it and find out more juicy information on the "Illuminati".

 

Also notice the book, The Spear of Destiny. I thumbed to a page that was talking about the Hapsburg Regalia and the Germans discussing armaments and war, probably WWII, but I will scan it later some more.

 

With all these books I feel like I am so much closer to finding out so many of my unanswered questions about WTH is really going on behind the curtain.

 

Check out this 2009 issue of Nexus magazine, good stuff inside, I'll post some pics of it later.

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I'd like to recommend the works of Richard W. Wetherill. He wrote several books concerning objective morality and the dangers of dishonesty. In the present day we know all-too-well how little truth and objective reality are valued by society. Many individuals chose to label 'true' that which is comfortable to them and fits their world-view, thus attempting to alter and manipulate truth as it suits them. On the contrary, I contend that truth is immutable and objective - something we must align ourselves with. In his books you will find that Wetherill shares this ideology and makes clear arguments against dishonesty, deception, and obfuscation of truth and reality.

 

Here are a couple of his books, with direct links to PDF's courtesy of Mark Passio from his website What On Earth Is Happening:

And here is a short companion piece that summarizes his work, written by one of his students:

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I would also like to recommend The End of All Evil by Jeremy Locke. This is a concise treatise on freedom and liberty, teaching the equally infinite value of each expression of life. It is a short (~ 98 pages) read and I find it to be superbly written. Here are the opening words of the text:

 

Quote

The definition of freedom is the infinite value of the human being. The definition of evil is the destruction of freedom. Everything that is evil teaches people that they have limited value.

Simple

Truth is always simple. All people recognize truth because all people are intelligent beings. It is the nature of evil to create artificially complex ideas. It does this to hide or obfuscate the freedom it destroys. If you remove the complexities and fears from your life you will find a plain and beautiful truth. This truth is the nature of your worth.

...

 

I hope the opening passage above entices you to read more of what Locke has to say in these brief notes. Here is a direct link to the PDF, courtesy of Mark Passio from his website What On Earth Is Happening: (http://www.whatonearthishappening.com/images/stories/woeih/podcast/073/End-Of-All-Evil.pdf)

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Elon Musk and the transhumanists  are weirdos but I was once curious about how they think, so:

 

Life 3.0: Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence by Max Tegmark

 

Indeed, the MIT set is psychopathic.  It describes killer drones that will descend, slice and drill into a person’s head.   They also come across as extremely arrogant.  The book does confirm that they have no intention whatsoever of including anyone but themselves in their digital utopia.  Only people like Larry David will be seen flying around with AI wings and such stupidity like that.
Elon Musk recommended this book when he was out telling the world to fear AI.  Turns out the real reason is that the author kisses his ass throughout the whole book. 
 

The Singularity by Ray Kurzweil 

Of course got this from that killer video game Black Mirror episode.  
Ray has done some good in the world through technology, particularly for the blind, but in the end he is in the club.  He’s peddling the same utopian digital dream.

His subsequent book,  Transcend, is supposed to be full of useful health info, but it repeats the same pipe dream and throws in some expensive supplements.  
 

Analysis:  Transhumanists are absolutely petrified of dying. 

 

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Title: The Iron Triangle: Inside the Liberal Democratic Plan to Use Race to Divide Christians and America in their Quest for Power and How We Can Defeat Them

Author: Vince Everett Ellison

Published: 2019

 

Not a Christian myself, although I support the book...

 

Also,

 

Title: China Virus: How Justin Trudeau's Pro-Communist Ideology is Putting Canadians in Danger

Author: Ezra Levant

Published: 2020

 

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On 6/30/2020 at 12:51 PM, Mitochondrial Eve said:

I haven't read it myself yet but 'The Poisoned Needle' by Eleanor McBean is an oft cited book, written in 1957, examining the "increasing flood of evidence against vaccination" and the "false germ theory". It can be found on the following link.

 

 

http://whale.to/a/mcbean.html

She speaks pretty close to the truth except that war has definitely left quite a massive scar on humanity.

 

That whale.to website is great, I totally forgot about it, thanks for the post, Eve.

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Beauty Pays: Why Attractive People Are More Successful

by Daniel S. Hamermesh

 

How beauty leads to better jobs, better wages, and better spouses

 

Most of us know there is a payoff to looking good, and in the quest for beauty we spend countless hours and billions of dollars on personal grooming, cosmetics, and plastic surgery. But how much better off are the better looking? Based on the evidence, quite a lot.
 

The first book to seriously measure the advantages of beauty, Beauty Pays demonstrates how society favors the beautiful and how better-looking people experience startling but undeniable benefits in all aspects of life. Noted economist Daniel Hamermesh shows that the attractive are more likely to be employed, work more productively and profitably, receive more substantial pay, obtain loan approvals, negotiate loans with better terms, and have more handsome and highly educated spouses. Hamermesh explains why this happens and what it means for the beautiful—and the not-so-beautiful—among us.

 

Exploring whether a universal standard of beauty exists, Hamermesh illustrates how attractive workers make more money, how these amounts differ by gender, and how looks are valued differently based on profession. He considers whether extra pay for good-looking people represents discrimination, and, if so, who is discriminating.

 

Hamermesh investigates the commodification of beauty in dating and how this influences the search for intelligent or high-earning mates, and even examines whether government programs should aid the ugly. He also discusses whether the economic benefits of beauty will persist into the foreseeable future and what the "looks-challenged" can do to overcome their disadvantage.


Reflecting on a sensitive issue that touches everyone, Beauty Pays proves that beauty's rewards are anything but superficial.

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Really excellent book Nourishing Wisdom by Marc David

 

Many good points about how the method with which we take in food is just as important if not more important than the quality of the food itself.

That food made with love has its own power, regardless of the ingredients. 
 

He goes into slowing down while eating to chew and taste.  (Something I have trouble with cause I tend to inhale just to get it over with) 

 

The politics of eating, etc. 

 

Quote:

 

”Many people who want no rules or restrictions with diet and believe ‘anything goes’ operate on the belief that no relationship exists between cause and effect.  Somehow, what they do in life or whatever they eat will not have future consequences, or so they hope.  Because they secretly fear responsibility they act as if responsibility were unnecessary.”

 

He also goes into the drinking contest as a right of passage in which abusing the body while still maintaining control is used to falsely prove one’s manhood.  Essentially a self destructive practice reinforced by culture. 

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I was reminded recently of C.S. Lewis's "The Last Battle", the last one of the Chronicles of Narnia, in which Narnia as everyone knew it ends. I have always found this book too terrible to be able to read it more than a couple of times, whereas the others I have devoured over and over again.

Now, though, I have read it again and find so much relevance in it to what is happening in our world right now! So, I thoroughly recommend it!

I have recommended it elsewhere in the forum already, but it definitely belongs here too!

The Last Battle

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On 7/28/2020 at 6:06 PM, Messenger said:

My parents were obsessed with Egypt. They brought these three Egypt books back in the 80's. My dad was big into Carlos Castaneda too.

You definitely have a few to get on with, I have read all the Castaneda books as well , excellent ,with all this material all you have to do now is make a start 👍

The Convoluted Universe series by Deloris Cannon is an interesting read also, but I think you have enough on your plate at the moment

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Julius Evola : Meditation on the Peaks ... awesome new arrival, really takes me high above all this foolish world into real exploration and courage.

 

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Jim Corbett was born in India a long time ago and worked in the administration of the railways for some time but in his holidays would head for the hills to hunt down man eating tigers and leopards in the mysterious wilderness of India, a dangerous and mysterious walk through the midnight world of real beasts and sometimes real magic.  Old school.  Often read another story aloud over breakfast coffee to prepare for the day !!

 

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20 hours ago, peter said:

You definitely have a few to get on with, I have read all the Castaneda books as well 

 


I don’t know maybe this should be a separate thread, but Carlos Castaneda...

was quite the character.  
Dubbed “the father of the new age movement” that in itself raises one eyebrow.  


Read his first book The Teachings of Don Juan cause I found it in the non-fiction section.  Come to find out the story was supposedly fabricated and should have been classified as fiction.  Read a couple more of his books because they really are something else. 

Do I deny these things happened to him?  No I think for him these things were real and he was in contact with a disembodied spirit.  


The first book contained the seeds of what Castaneda would later become.  A mad, delusional nutcase!  “Don Juan” warned him of it but he didn’t listen!
So in the end, when he died of cancer and his cult of short haired women wandered off into the desert and disappeared (probably died of exposure and picked apart by vultures), he seemed corrupt, arrogant, and fanatical.  
How could his teachings be taken seriously?

 


 

 

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I was first exposed to the wacky world of conspiracies as a teen by these two books: 

 

The Illuminatus! Trilogy by Robert Shea and Robert Anton Wilson


and

 

The Captains and the Kings by Taylor Caldwell

 

Once hooked into conspiracy culture there’s no escaping.  And the truth is always stranger than fiction. 

 

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2 hours ago, Michi713 said:


I don’t know maybe this should be a separate thread, but Carlos Castaneda...

was quite the character.  
Dubbed “the father of the new age movement” that in itself raises one eyebrow.  


Read his first book The Teachings of Don Juan cause I found it in the non-fiction section.  Come to find out the story was supposedly fabricated and should have been classified as fiction.  Read a couple more of his books because they really are something else. 

Do I deny these things happened to him?  No I think for him these things were real and he was in contact with a disembodied spirit.  


The first book contained the seeds of what Castaneda would later become.  A mad, delusional nutcase!  “Don Juan” warned him of it but he didn’t listen!
So in the end, when he died of cancer and his cult of short haired women wandered off into the desert and disappeared (probably died of exposure and picked apart by vultures), he seemed corrupt, arrogant, and fanatical.  
How could his teachings be taken seriously?

 


 

 

Some say they are all bullshit others as they are all real , me I think they are books that contain  elements of fact woven with a bloody good story , if he was getting into datura ,that shit will sent you mad, people have it growing all over the place down here in gardens etc ,I would lay money that most don't have a clue what they have

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