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Alnitak
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IDK if it’s because I’m female, but along with the practical aspects of growing food it is important to pay attention to the rhythms of our planet, the moon, and sun.  

 

Examples are planting seeds at the new moon, planting according to the equinoxes and solstices, and letting the plants compost in place through the winter.  

 

Also prayers of thanks for the the yield and for the opportunity to be a part!

 

Learning permaculture techniques of growing taught how nature often works in cooperation and growing food doesn’t always have to involve struggle with the land.  

 

Like in America, for 5,000 years, natives grew the “three sisters”: corn, beans, and squash together in a cluster.  The plants each have properties that help each other thrive.  Mine are working just as well.  

 

There are lessons about life and death revealed in letting things rot and watching life grow out of it. 

 

This is my first attempt at growing food and medicinal plants, but I feel a little more human than I did before, and it’s good! 

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On 7/11/2020 at 2:13 PM, chocomel said:

 

OK, this was rather negative aspect of the situation BUT one needs to realise that you have everything in your hand to change this circumstance which doesn't cost anything.

You have helpers waiting your instruction but you need to perk them up as well. The problem is.....people are sleep that they don't recognise there is a door that can be opened. There are so much you can do which hasn't been talked about in the forum at all.

hi @chocomel i have been thinking pretty much along the same lines as you, i do feel there should be a thread were others on here can help others along there spiritual path.

I see so many people on here whos knowledge has me totally bowled over, if all this could be put together and each contribute to it with stuff that works not new age crud.

i feel we could help open more minds and raise the vibration just a thought bro 

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On 7/13/2020 at 10:38 PM, Brad the lad said:

 

No cases reported  for Amazon or Walmart though?

 

Funny how it's the small family run buisness that always seem to have the cases.

Amazon or  A.i - Mason (as I like to call them) have none and yet they employ way more staff.....hmmmmm?

 

Of course not. That will never happen to give them a leaverage. LOL

Tell the small farmers not to get their staff tested otherwise they are stabbing themselves with false positive....i.e. end of business.

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Looks like the processing plant stories have gone quiet whilst they ramp up general CV fear mongering  2 wave scare stories instead. Like today the virus causes long term heart problems. Also number of cases increasing around the world (all suits the masking agenda).

 

I was hoping to move somewhere during the summer that has a bigger garden but it is looking unlikely now. So does anyone have any tips on what i can grow during autumn and winter in the UK in a small garden that gets no sun in the winter?  

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6 hours ago, Alnitak said:

Looks like the processing plant stories have gone quiet whilst they ramp up general CV fear mongering  2 wave scare stories instead. Like today the virus causes long term heart problems. Also number of cases increasing around the world (all suits the masking agenda).

 

I was hoping to move somewhere during the summer that has a bigger garden but it is looking unlikely now. So does anyone have any tips on what i can grow during autumn and winter in the UK in a small garden that gets no sun in the winter?  

 

For some reason I had forgotten about this thread, maybe because it's buried in 'General Chat' when it should really have it's own section?

Anyways, on to your question...

I had a look in my trusty "Practical Self Sufficiency" (a book I'd highly recommend that has some great ideas and tips) but at first glance it seems like there's little or nothing that can be sown in Autumn for Winter harvest. Most of the veg that we associate with winter like turnips, parsnips, brussels sprouts etc. seem to require sowing much earlier. Also, the "no sun" aspect of your garden wouldn't help either.

 

However there's something else I'd consider as a possible alternative.....dehydrating?

I'm just after getting a decent dehydrator and I plan to use it to preserve any excess I might hopefully have in Autumn. They're not mad expensive to buy (£230 for a ten tray) and cheap to run, and any excess fruit or veg you may have can be dehydrated for use over winter. Even if you don't have excess to preserve, you could buy fruit/veg while it's plentiful?

 

Because I had forgotten about this thread I re-read practically the whole thing and there were some things I had missed first time around. I think it was Brad the Lad who posted a great video that shows how to vacuum seal by simply using a bucket of water. Dehydrated vacuum sealed bags of fruit/veg would be easy to store, take up little space and can be easily rehydrated. I know it doesn't really answer your question but that's the route I'll be taking.

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16 hours ago, Storm in the garden said:

 

For some reason I had forgotten about this thread, maybe because it's buried in 'General Chat' when it should really have it's own section?

Anyways, on to your question...

I had a look in my trusty "Practical Self Sufficiency" (a book I'd highly recommend that has some great ideas and tips) but at first glance it seems like there's little or nothing that can be sown in Autumn for Winter harvest. Most of the veg that we associate with winter like turnips, parsnips, brussels sprouts etc. seem to require sowing much earlier. Also, the "no sun" aspect of your garden wouldn't help either.

 

However there's something else I'd consider as a possible alternative.....dehydrating?

I'm just after getting a decent dehydrator and I plan to use it to preserve any excess I might hopefully have in Autumn. They're not mad expensive to buy (£230 for a ten tray) and cheap to run, and any excess fruit or veg you may have can be dehydrated for use over winter. Even if you don't have excess to preserve, you could buy fruit/veg while it's plentiful?

 

Because I had forgotten about this thread I re-read practically the whole thing and there were some things I had missed first time around. I think it was Brad the Lad who posted a great video that shows how to vacuum seal by simply using a bucket of water. Dehydrated vacuum sealed bags of fruit/veg would be easy to store, take up little space and can be easily rehydrated. I know it doesn't really answer your question but that's the route I'll be taking.

actually STORM that is of its self a bloody good strategy and extremely viable thank you

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What are peoples thoughts on pickling as as a way of preserving?

 

Using good ingredients and sea salt is my preferred method over canned goods.

 

I'll pickle anything except parsnips and celery, that didnt work out at all too fibrous.

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6 hours ago, Chef said:

What are peoples thoughts on pickling as as a way of preserving?

 

Using good ingredients and sea salt is my preferred method over canned goods.

 

I'll pickle anything except parsnips and celery, that didnt work out at all too fibrous.

 

I'd like to try that too but know nothing about it.

Is it basically just preserving in salted water (brine)?

What's the ratio?

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10 hours ago, Storm in the garden said:

 

I'd like to try that too but know nothing about it.

Is it basically just preserving in salted water (brine)?

What's the ratio?

https://www.thespruceeats.com/quick-refrigerator-dill-pickles-1327785

 

I use this recipe as a base and add fennel seed as well.

 

cold crisp pickled vegetables go down so well in a hot day.

 

Marks n sparks food is agreat place to find things to pickle theyre always reducing their veg to pennies by the end of the day.

 

yellow sticker crew!

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On 7/28/2020 at 7:44 AM, Storm in the garden said:

 

For some reason I had forgotten about this thread, maybe because it's buried in 'General Chat' when it should really have it's own section?

Anyways, on to your question...

I had a look in my trusty "Practical Self Sufficiency" (a book I'd highly recommend that has some great ideas and tips) but at first glance it seems like there's little or nothing that can be sown in Autumn for Winter harvest. Most of the veg that we associate with winter like turnips, parsnips, brussels sprouts etc. seem to require sowing much earlier. Also, the "no sun" aspect of your garden wouldn't help either.

 

However there's something else I'd consider as a possible alternative.....dehydrating?

I'm just after getting a decent dehydrator and I plan to use it to preserve any excess I might hopefully have in Autumn. They're not mad expensive to buy (£230 for a ten tray) and cheap to run, and any excess fruit or veg you may have can be dehydrated for use over winter. Even if you don't have excess to preserve, you could buy fruit/veg while it's plentiful?

 

Because I had forgotten about this thread I re-read practically the whole thing and there were some things I had missed first time around. I think it was Brad the Lad who posted a great video that shows how to vacuum seal by simply using a bucket of water. Dehydrated vacuum sealed bags of fruit/veg would be easy to store, take up little space and can be easily rehydrated. I know it doesn't really answer your question but that's the route I'll be taking.

 

Thanks @Storm in the garden yeah got the odds against me where im living at the moment.  I will look at dehydration, i just dont get much time to do anything which is also a big problem for me. It is just a case of chop it up and put it on, or does anything else need doing apart from them packing it? (Got a kid under 8 and im on my own and im working 6 days a week) .Might be best us to  get as much tinned stuff in as i can for now. Got a storage space if needed for them and can use my relo's for overflow storage if needed. 

 

Get the feeling this winter is gonna be worse than this spring summer and that doesnt really seem possible but the way things are going i feel it is coming. Anything anyone can do in the coming months is gonna help, even if you dont need the stuff you can use it later or give it a neighbour or other family members.

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On 8/1/2020 at 12:27 AM, Alnitak said:

Got a kid under 8 and im on my own and im working 6 days a week)

 

That's a difficult situation to be in so probably better just sticking with shop bought foods.

Another couple of things you might want to have in reserve would be potato flakes (long storage life) and noodles (medium storage).

 

Around a month ago I suggested that because of an odd situation where a hospital appointment was cancelled I believed a second lockdown may be happening in September?

Then yesterday I watched a video from Bjorn Andreas Bull-Hansen where he said that sources he trusted who had predicted the previous lockdown were saying that another lockdown was coming in September. I'm not saying it's correct but merely saying that people should be prepared....just in case.

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2 hours ago, rideforever said:

 

Cool ... I have also been putting in 2 flat tsp of Garam Masala ... instead of the usual Cinnamon/Cloves.  Also very good.   And I get the linseed mix and mixed seeds from Aldi and chuck them in. 

All told, a serious meal.

 

 

@rideforever  liking the sound of linseed mix and mixed seeds, shall check out Aldi.  Thanks again.

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So we come from a small island called Malta, and to make our own national recipe we made our very own Maltese Egg Muffins, which is basically a Mediterranean breakfast muffin. Any suggestions on what spices other spices we can put in it? (preferably ones that come from different regions of the world), we're trying to make an international muffin 😛

SubtractKilos Maltese Egg Muffin Recipe

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On 7/25/2020 at 7:39 AM, EnigmaticWorld said:

 

 

 

 

 

etb.jpg.bb7000335ab7fdfba064b6a109252dae.jpg

 

That person write winger sounds like one of those morons who hasn't had his awakening yet regarding how animals are treated and the energy/emotion they are producing/feeling and how it passes to people. That and the acid alkalinity pH scale.

 

Cows in fact are very bad for the Earth and for human consumption. We are growing a ton of corn, which has no nutritional value for us, and we feed it to the cows, which people then slaughter and eat, and then that low frequency meat on the acidic side of the pH scale create a bunch of mucus in the consumer which then allows bacteria to grow causing dis-ease, to which the ignorant consumer then goes to the "doctor", most often a brainwashed quack, who prescribes a big phamra/sorcerer created drug to mask the illness created by consuming the acid. Rinse repeat and this is the modern human being and their agricultural and "health" "care" system.

 

It's so sad to watch. All these people when I speak to them tell me about how so and so has cancer, and they want me to feel sorry for them, and I don't. I suppose that makes me a bad person, not feeling bad for people who refuse to learn about nutrition.

 

Just maybe the bad people in CA legislature are trying to solve the problem of cows ruling the land by forcing dumb people to eat more vegetables and fruits. OMG what terrible people! God forbid someone try to reduce the amount of cows who are being mistreated.

 

If you can stomach this one, let me know and I'll post a vid that goes deeper into the slaughterhouse, the video that made me physically ill that I had to turn off, I bet everyone will absolutely love it. The part where they hang pigs from their back legs, and then slice them open while they are alive was the best, hearing their screeches of pain, WOW, what a rush! (heavy sarcasm in case you missed it).

 

Maybe that is ONE reason why some of us no longer eat meat, in addition to the strange relation of pig skin to human skin and the fact that there are mentally ill people out there in the world who love to play genetics games with oh....every living organism it seems.

 

 

 

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49 minutes ago, Messenger said:

That person write winger sounds like one of those morons who hasn't had his awakening yet regarding how animals are treated and the energy/emotion they are producing/feeling and how it passes to people. That and the acid alkalinity pH scale.

 

If you can stomach this one, let me know and I'll post a vid that goes deeper into the slaughterhouse, the video that made me physically ill that I had to turn off, I bet everyone will absolutely love it. The part where they hang pigs from their back legs, and then slice them open while they are alive was the best, hearing their screeches of pain, WOW, what a rush! (heavy sarcasm in case you missed it).

 

Maybe that is ONE reason why some of us no longer eat meat, in addition to the strange relation of pig skin to human skin and the fact that there are mentally ill people out there in the world who love to play genetics games with oh....every living organism it seems.

 

 


Corrr!.......She makes me hungry 😛 - until I watched a bit more of the intermittent images of various cows being fisted and bull sperm everywhere!
Good post - and serious stuff though messenger - I'm going back in (so to speak) to watch the rest in a minute.

What's your opinion on Quorn stuff?

I only ask as since january -  I have (99% of the time) become a vegitarian - and the quorn stuff is everwhere and tastes okay.

EDIT:   SSSSShhiiiiiiiit?      ........ just watched the rest of this video, very sad - but very important.  Well done for bringing it toour attention though.

rhino milk is for rhinos, dog milk is for dogs, cat milk is for cats,  rat milk is for rats, but cows milk?....... is for humans????
Dairy is fucking scary indeed.


 

 

Edited by sickofallthebollocks
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Good afternoon Bollocks,

 

Yeah it's a eye opening video alright, and that's only the tip of the iceberg so to speak.

 

People say, well plants are highly conscious too, and I agree, but they are in their natural habitat, planted in the ground, in Earth, their branches and leaves able to sway in the breeze and grow thanks to the sunlight, exactly how they are normally out in the "wild". Birds can still nest and sit on their branches, squirrel's can still frolic and run through the trees, etc. Picking their fruit seems to me the least invasive and aggressive form of gathering food for us to sustain life. Trees produce fruit and vegetables that are naturally alkaline/electric, that to me is God speaking to us.

 

Items that are man made are acidic, that is the work of the black magicians and those who like to play God. See pigs and cows and orange carrots and soy. Where did cows come from? They seem to be a cross breed between water buffalo and something else.

 

Quorn, since you asked. :classic_biggrin: I'm an avid ingredient-label-reader now, so the first thing I did was search for that and right away I see stuff that I would not eat. Canola oil (Canada oil, research that one), "natural flavor" (such as?), milk proteins, potato maltodextrin (starch), sugar, and eggs. Oh and whatever mycoprotein is, some sort of mold. :classic_blink: Bottom line though is that whatever that product is, it is on the acid side of the pH scale, so it is not providing energy as in rebuilding cells.

 

I saw this quorn product on the shelf when I worked at whole foods but I never looked at it too close. It was big around Thanksgiving, they offered a meatless turkey meal. I wouldn't eat anything they offered. The produce department is the real health care system and humanity's best friend.

 

Here is a basic dish I put together, I eat this often. Pasta or quinoa. Usually these days I am laying down a bed of quinoa. Pasta I do a few times a month. Then in a pot I pour 4 cups of water, shake some salt and onion powder in, turn on heat in between low and medium (number 4 setting). I have been using the pink himylayan salt. Then I wash my kale and tear it from the stem and tear it into bite size pieces. Then chop up and add zucchini, then chop up and add red bell pepper, then chop and add baby bella shrooms, then tear up pieces of basil and add them. Stir, cover and let the flavors blend and the kale "relax" so it's not so tough/stiff.

 

Then after about four to five minutes turn off the stove and pour the now vegetable broth over the quinoa and then the rest into a glass. Edit, forgot, then top with walnuts. Then add the veggies to the bowl of quinoa and garnish it with half a chopped avocado and some fresh basil.

 

Done, enjoy. The glass is a veggie broth like tea full of nutrients.

 

This photo below I didn't cook the mushroom but used it as a topper for my pin-wheel design.

quorn ingredients.jpg

Messenger-Veggie-Bowl-2019-2020.jpg

Edited by Messenger
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Oh duh, the Mycoprotein protein is Mycelia fungus, which is why they call it a "mold". Myco, greek for fungus.

 

I have been meaning to share the progress with my Avocado plant. It is growing well. I took these last week and those leaves seen sprouting are already green.

 

I found this pro tip on youtube for growing healthier plants that seems to be working. I take my banana peel after I make a smoothie, and put it in a jar and fill it with water and seal it, let it ferment for a few days at room temp, and then I feed it to the plant, pour it on. Then I follow up that with some water. I also dig a hole next to the seed a few inches away from roots and bury some small food scraps, adding nutrients back to the soil.

 

The mango plant is coming along well too but has developed some brown spots I need to look into fixing.

 

The basil is going nuts, I need to buy like three small pots and trim it and plant the stems. I did that with the one in the avocado plant bowl and it's coming along well too.

 

The lovely lady bug I released in some tall flowers and brush lining large trees outside near our garden. She crawled from the glass I transported her in, onto a flower. She walked around, then went straight to the center and seemed to feed or be enchanted, I hope, with what she was seeing. A happy feeling came over me and so I felt comfortable leaving her there in her natural habitat, so I said goodbye.

avocado-ladybug.jpg

Messenger-plants-2020.jpg

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17 hours ago, Messenger said:

That person write winger sounds like one of those morons....

 

I postponed replying to your post initially because I wanted to allow some time to mull over it rather than responding immediately. I agree with some of what you say in your post. I don't abide by any form of animal cruelty yet I still eat meat, which I realize is somewhat of a contradiction. I have considered becoming a vegetarian a number of times but probably due to lack of application on my part haven't got round to it....yet?

 

However, we evolved as 'hunter gatherers' and have survived and multiplied through variations of that diet for the last hundred thousand years or so. I don't think it would be wise to try to change a hundred thousand years of evolution in one generation, and certainly not by some sort of forced transfer from something shown to work to something still in it's infancy.

Yes I agree that through greed and ignorance the methodology we have recently evolved into is wrong, but that does not necessarily mean that the basic concept is wrong.

I personally believe that John Seymour, who is considered to be the godfather of self-sufficiency had the right balance, you raise animals in their natural environment where they experience the elements throughout their lives, then when the time comes you end it swiftly and humanely.

This is a much better ending than most creatures get in nature, where they're either eaten alive, die of starvation, or suffer the slow, painful death of old age.

 

Nature is cruel. Plants are eaten by insects which are eaten by other insects which are eaten by birds which are eaten by predators, which eventually die and are absorbed by plants which are eaten by insects etc. It's all very well talking about birds in trees eating berries, but most of nature is not like that, it's a constant struggle for survival. You see a documentary focused on an antelope, and you're saddened by the antelope being killed by a lion. You see a documentary focused on a lioness and her cubs, and you're saddened if the cubs are dying due to starvation. Well sorry but either the antelope dies or the cubs die. That's the nature of this reality we find ourselves in.

When I moved here three years ago, one of the first things I did was get some ex-battery hens. I figured I'd give them a better life of a taste of freedom, and maybe get the occasional egg to boot. I went out one day and one of them was lying bloodied on the ground, the others were essentially pecking it to death. Why? I don't know, but I had to euthanize it myself to put it out of it's misery.

Last year I built a raised bed at the top of the garden, then covered it over to suppress any weeds. This year I went up to plant some vegetables and when I lifted the cover, there was a whole micro-system of insects and all sorts of small creatures scurrying for cover. So do I destroy this whole ecosystem to plant some vegetables? There are no simple answers in nature, and everything you do has consequences.

 

You alluded to this next possibility in your post. Do plants feel pain?

I remember reading an experiment which showed that through a series of underground hairlike fibers trees have the ability to communicate. I've actually seen these fibers myself when I dug up some ground near trees. So although we may not be able to detect it, do carrots scream in agony when we pull them from their habitat, skin them alive, chop them up and boil them?

 

17 hours ago, Messenger said:

Cows in fact are very bad for the Earth

 

Cows are not bad for the earth. Too many cows may be bad for the earth, but too many of any species (including humans) are. Nature regulates this by supply and demand. To use your example too many birds eating berries and the berry supply dwindles causing a population drop in birds due to lack of food. The problem occurs when nature is overridden by artificial means.

What about the “low frequency” meat eaten by carnivores? Wolves have been eating low frequency meat for longer than humanity has been around? I think any creature being eaten alive must surely be emitting a low frequency, or does low frequency only affect humans?

And, what do you propose to do with all the dogs of the world? Should they all be eradicated?

There are a lot of people here who would regard their dog or dogs to be part of their family, me included, so what are you suggesting for those carnivores?

And please don't go down the “alternative feeding” route by suggesting they can be converted to plant based diets. I know from research and personal experience that dogs require meat, and preferably raw meat. You cannot change a digestive system which has evolved over millennia in a generation.

I also think it's a bit disingenuous to suggest that people with cancer are simply the victims of their own stupidity. Maybe some are due to their poor eating habits, but there are others who are simply unfortunate. There are many carcinogenic elements exposed by living in today's society to which people have no knowledge of due to information being suppressed. I only recently watched the movie “Dark Waters” about the DuPont Teflon scandal. Are you suggesting those people were victims of their own stupidity merely by using a particular cooking utensil?

 

Nothing is black and white. The problem arises when people presume they have a clear singular solution to a complex set of issues, and wish to force that solution onto everyone. Just as I will not wear a mask or take a vaccine because a small group of people decide that is what I should do, I will not eat bugs for the same reason. Nobody or no one small group has all the answers in my view.

I'm not talking about you in this instance because I know that you at least partially grow your own food, but there are people attempting to make decisions regarding food and nature who have never grown a thing in their lives or even walked in a field. It's ludicrous, and they have no right to dictate to others when all they have are vague theories and no experience.

So should we adapt a more humane and ethical approach to animal husbandry? Absolutely.

Should we adopt a more responsible approach to healthy diet? Of course.

Should we seek to enforce our dietary beliefs on the entire world population? No we shouldn't.

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