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Chinese ambassador to Israel found dead at home, says Israeli foreign ministry

Du Wei was appointed envoy in February in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic and previously served as China's envoy to Ukraine.The ambassador's death comes just two days after he condemned comments by visiting US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, who denounced Chinese investments in Israel and accused China of hiding information about the COVID-19 outbreak.Israel's Channel 12 TV, quoting unidentified emergency medical officials, said initial indications were that Du died in
his sleep of natural causes.

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Sensible article from today's Sunday Times    The lesson of Covid-19 is brutally simple and applies generally to public regulation. Free people make mistakes and willingly take risks. If we

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Pity they don't put that money into finding out what health risks it causes before lining their pockets scumbags.

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1 minute ago, kj35 said:

Chinese ambassador to Israel found dead at home, says Israeli foreign ministry

Du Wei was appointed envoy in February in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic and previously served as China's envoy to Ukraine.

 

Yeah, I just read this article on RT very interesting. The Jerusalem Post article is more in depth if you have not read that one. 

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53 minutes ago, Tinfoil Hat said:

Sorry, I didn't see this and have just posted about it on the mega thread. 

I just thought it was worth sticking a new today's news as I always get the feeling I'm being distracted and I like to pay attention to as many things as possible. 

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53 minutes ago, Tinfoil Hat said:

Sorry, I didn't see this and have just posted about it on the mega thread. 

I just thought it was worth sticking a new today's news as I always get the feeling I'm being distracted and I like to pay attention to as many things as possible. 

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Just now, kj35 said:

I just thought it was worth sticking a new today's news as I always get the feeling I'm being distracted and I like to pay attention to as many things as possible. 

 

You're right. The nature of the other thread means that each item's attention is diluted.  

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I dont think I posted that twice (deliberately).  But let's see

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Yep. Something funny going on my end . Stuff slow and acting weirdly. Could be coindence but am logging out for safety for now.

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Sensible article from today's Sunday Times 

 

The lesson of Covid-19 is brutally simple and applies generally to public regulation. Free people make mistakes and willingly take risks. If we hold politicians responsible for everything that goes wrong, they will take away our liberty so that nothing can go wrong. They will do this not for our protection against risk, but for their own protection against criticism.

The lockdown was originally justified as a temporary measure to spread coronavirus infections over a longer period. This was to allow time for the NHS’s critical care capacity to catch up. Hence the slogan “Protect the NHS”.

It was never much of a rationale. The NHS is there to protect us, not the other way round. How could its unpreparedness possibly justify depriving the entire UK population of its liberty, pushing us into the worst recession since the early 18th century, destroying millions of jobs and hundreds of thousands of businesses, piling up public and private debt on a crippling scale and undermining the education of our children?

Since the prime minister’s broadcast last Sunday, the lockdown has found a new rationale. The government has dropped “Protect the NHS” from its slogan. The reason is plain from the paper it published the following day. The NHS is not at risk.

This is partly because the government has done an outstanding job in increasing intensive care capacity, and partly because the threat to the NHS was always overstated. The critical care capacity of the NHS has nearly doubled since January, even without the 4,000 or more additional beds in seven temporary Nightingale hospitals. Around the top of the spike in infections, on April 10, 41% of NHS general acute beds were empty. Only 51% of acute beds were occupied by a Covid-19 patient. The current figure is 20%. The Nightingale hospitals stand empty. These are government figures.

Today, the lockdown is only about shielding us from the risk of infection. This raises serious questions about our relationship with the state. It is our business, not the state’s, to say what risks we will take with our own health. We are not fools or children needing to be told by ministers what is good for us, and forced by police officers to do it. We should not need to consult ministers, as the first member of the public to phone in to the daily press conference did, about whether she was allowed to hug her grandchildren.

The usual answer is that by going out and about we may infect other people. But that no longer works as an excuse for coercion. Those who do not want to run the risk of being infected can isolate themselves voluntarily. They will be no worse off than they are under the current compulsory regime. The rest of us can then get on with our lives.

The continuance of the lockdown is particularly odd given that in its latest paper the government accepts that, whatever we do, Covid-19 is likely to be with us long term. So unless it plans to keep the lockdown in place for ever, all that it achieves is to put off the moment when we have to face the risk anyway.

The prime minister told the House of Commons on Monday that his new so-called plan was workable because the British would use their common sense. In that case, why not allow them to do so by leaving the decisions to them?

Instead, we are resorting to law, which, because it requires exact definition, will always cover very many things that are perfectly harmless. Thus it was OK to go for a walk in the park but not to sunbathe. It is OK to drive to the Lake District but not to visit your second home. It is OK to meet one person but not two, and OK to do it in the front garden but not in the back. This kind of thing is arbitrary and absurd. It discredits the law as well as those who make it.

So how has the government ended up in this unsustainable position?

The answer is that, having originally embarked on a sensible policy that would have avoided a lockdown, it did a 180-degree turn on the afternoon of March 23, without thinking of the wider implications. It was in a blind panic provoked by Professor Neil Ferguson’s “reasonable worst case” of 510,000 deaths. Quite apart from the fact that a worst case is by definition an unlikely one, few scientists now support this figure. But it has had disastrous consequences. It pushed the government into making a decision that mocks our humanity and treats us all as mere tools of government policy.

The government terrified people into submission by giving the impression that Covid-19 was dangerous for everyone. It is not. It attacks people with serious vulnerabilities. By most estimates, between 0.5% and 0.75% of infected persons die. Of those, 87% are over 65 and at least 90% have multiple causes only one of which is Covid-19, according to the Office for National Statistics. The death rate for those under 50 is tiny. For the overwhelming majority, the symptoms are mild. Yet Matt Hancock solemnly intoned that “if you go out, people will die”, in what was surely the high point of governmental hype.

The prime minister’s broadcast was supposed to be his Churchillian moment. Instead, we beheld a man imprisoned by his own rhetoric and the logic of his past mistakes.

The lockdown is now all about protecting politicians’ backs. They are not wicked men, just timid ones, terrified of being blamed for deaths on their watch. But it is a wicked thing that they are doing.

Lord Sumption is a former Supreme Court judge and last year’s BBC Reith 

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Got skin in the Game ?

 

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monday may 18 2020

News

CORONAVIRUS

Huawei’s ‘£5m sponsorship deal with Imperial College

Huawei is helping to fund Imperial College research by paying for a superfast 5G network, it was reported

ALY SONG/REUTERS

Nicola Woolcock

Monday May 18 2020, 12.01am, The Times

The tech giant Huawei has struck a £5 million sponsorship deal with a British university, it was claimed yesterday.

Imperial College London, whose research into coronavirus is used to inform government policy, is setting up a tech campus in west London.

Huawei, which is based in China, will help to fund it by paying for research and facilities and a superfast 5G network for the university, The Mail on Sunday reported.

More than a dozen scientists at the university have contributed to the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies, Whitehall’s pandemic response unit.

The rolling out of the 5G network has led to fears about espionage and there are also concerns over China’s handling of the Covid-19 outbreak.

 

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/huaweis-5m-sponsorship-deal-with-imperial-college-l36g6cftq

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7 hours ago, kj35 said:

Got skin in the Game ?

 

MENU

monday may 18 2020

News

CORONAVIRUS

Huawei’s ‘£5m sponsorship deal with Imperial College

Huawei is helping to fund Imperial College research by paying for a superfast 5G network, it was reported

ALY SONG/REUTERS

Nicola Woolcock

Monday May 18 2020, 12.01am, The Times

The tech giant Huawei has struck a £5 million sponsorship deal with a British university, it was claimed yesterday.

Imperial College London, whose research into coronavirus is used to inform government policy, is setting up a tech campus in west London.

Huawei, which is based in China, will help to fund it by paying for research and facilities and a superfast 5G network for the university, The Mail on Sunday reported.

More than a dozen scientists at the university have contributed to the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies, Whitehall’s pandemic response unit.

The rolling out of the 5G network has led to fears about espionage and there are also concerns over China’s handling of the Covid-19 outbreak.

 

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/huaweis-5m-sponsorship-deal-with-imperial-college-l36g6cftq

 

Pity they don't put that money into finding out what health risks it causes before lining their pockets scumbags.

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On 5/17/2020 at 11:05 AM, kj35 said:

Chinese ambassador to Israel found dead at home, says Israeli foreign ministry

Du Wei was appointed envoy in February in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic and previously served as China's envoy to Ukraine.The ambassador's death comes just two days after he condemned comments by visiting US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, who denounced Chinese investments in Israel and accused China of hiding information about the COVID-19 outbreak.Israel's Channel 12 TV, quoting unidentified emergency medical officials, said initial indications were that Du died in
his sleep of natural causes.

 

 

Sorry I keep rehearsing my hypothesis and I'll not insist further then, but it's just one more event in support because it's not just business but world domination that's in play…

 

BRIC is just about to take over the power so how do they make up for it ?... well the US president pats Putin in the back while the whole West wages a media defamation war called 'COVID' against China… it's only through the media and the motto is still divide and conquer…

 

In this case we may consider happy we're not all sent to death on battlefields like in the past, yet it's still people again that are made pay for the domination fantasy of a handful billionaires, I really don't care who 'rules' the world and whoever it is won't change my life…

 

 

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8 hours ago, kj35 said:

Got skin in the Game ?

 

MENU

monday may 18 2020

News

CORONAVIRUS

Huawei’s ‘£5m sponsorship deal with Imperial College

Huawei is helping to fund Imperial College research by paying for a superfast 5G network, it was reported

ALY SONG/REUTERS

Nicola Woolcock

Monday May 18 2020, 12.01am, The Times

The tech giant Huawei has struck a £5 million sponsorship deal with a British university, it was claimed yesterday.

Imperial College London, whose research into coronavirus is used to inform government policy, is setting up a tech campus in west London.

Huawei, which is based in China, will help to fund it by paying for research and facilities and a superfast 5G network for the university, The Mail on Sunday reported.

More than a dozen scientists at the university have contributed to the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies, Whitehall’s pandemic response unit.

The rolling out of the 5G network has led to fears about espionage and there are also concerns over China’s handling of the Covid-19 outbreak.

 

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/huaweis-5m-sponsorship-deal-with-imperial-college-l36g6cftq


 

Wow. What a coincidence that is!. 

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One thing was picked from my latest posts : COMMUNISM… sorry but it wasn't my subject, so I'll get done with it here since I can't get to start a new thread and I always go the the end of whatever I started... 

 

Some years ago Russia was already said to own a superior fire power than the USA of which military budget has been cut during the last decades. What BRIC was still lacking was commercial power and that's what China's been growing to such a point that both the USA and the European Union have been forced to take measures…

 

How many brands, companies and other parts of the European patrimony passed into India's or China's hands in the last 20 years ?

 

No wonder they had to do something that big, and no wonder nobody seems to know what's going on as much unexplainable it is otherwise… It's much more serious than a bogus 'pandemic' or the depopulation agenda of a handful psychopaths however powerful they may be. These ones are just let make their show as a diversion I guess…

 

World's leaders aren't such idiots as to buy into something so incredible and cheaply made, the saddest being to see how much most people are for complying so willingly…

 

 

Now, don't tell me our leaders pretend to save the West from Chinese domination and 'then' from Communism by preventing China and BRIC from keeping growing commercial power ?

 

Don't tell me that's why we've had to bear such a Third Reich 'nostalgia' from our media since a couple of years ? Because it would indeed recall what happened about 80 years ago and which reality has been labeled 'revisionist' until now…

 

 

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Sounds familiar

 

https://www.rt.com/news/489097-plandemic-website-hacked-covid19/

The website for the controversial ‘Plandemic’ documentary movie has been hacked by a disgruntled viewer who replaced the landing page with a message claiming its star Dr Judy Mikovits is “bat s**t crazy.”

The documentary, in which virologist Mikovits claims the Covid-19 virus was created in a lab and that wearing masks is dangerous, has been pulled from Facebook and YouTube and widely slated in mainstream media. It has still managed to attract millions of views on other platforms, including BitChute, however — a perhaps unsurprising side-effect of the valiant efforts to censor it.

Its website, WatchPlandemic.com, was hacked and vandalized on Monday. The landing page, which usually directs viewers to places where the documentary can still be viewed, was replaced with a black screen and four bullet points disputing claims made in the documentary.

The message, which is still visible on the page as of Tuesday afternoon GMT, states that “Judy Mikovitz is bat sh*t crazy (sic)” and that protective masks “aren't going to kill you.”

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18 hours ago, chud said:

 

One thing was picked from my latest posts : COMMUNISM… sorry but it wasn't my subject, so I'll get done with it here since I can't get to start a new thread and I always go the the end of whatever I started... 

 

Some years ago Russia was already said to own a superior fire power than the USA of which military budget has been cut during the last decades. What BRIC was still lacking was commercial power and that's what China's been growing to such a point that both the USA and the European Union have been forced to take measures…

 

How many brands, companies and other parts of the European patrimony passed into India's or China's hands in the last 20 years ?

 

No wonder they had to do something that big, and no wonder nobody seems to know what's going on as much unexplainable it is otherwise… It's much more serious than a bogus 'pandemic' or the depopulation agenda of a handful psychopaths however powerful they may be. These ones are just let make their show as a diversion I guess…

 

World's leaders aren't such idiots as to buy into something so incredible and cheaply made, the saddest being to see how much most people are for complying so willingly…

 

 

Now, don't tell me our leaders pretend to save the West from Chinese domination and 'then' from Communism by preventing China and BRIC from keeping growing commercial power ?

 

Don't tell me that's why we've had to bear such a Third Reich 'nostalgia' from our media since a couple of years ? Because it would indeed recall what happened about 80 years ago and which reality has been labeled 'revisionist' until now…

 

 

 

I've run out of likes, but that's an interesting point, Chud and might well be highly relevant. 

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Julian Assange's case has been deferred from yesterday to September. Bold emphasis and font size my additions

 

Julian Assange's case exposes British hypocrisy on press freedom

 

Peter Oborne

Published date: 5 May 2020 11:51 UTC | Last update: 2 weeks ago

 

The US indictment against the Wikileaks founder, if successful, will have terrible consequences for the free press

 

One of the most repugnant political faults is hypocrisy. Politicians say one thing, then do the opposite. This leaves a bad taste in the mouth, and brings public life into disrepute. 

The British Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab is a case in point. Sunday saw a grim example of Raab’s double dealing. He said that he supported free speech. "A strong and independent media," declared the foreign secretary, "is more important than ever."

Splendid words on World Press Freedom Day.

If only the British foreign secretary had meant a word he said. As Raab spoke up for free speech, his cabinet colleague Oliver Dowden led the latest government assault on the BBC.

Threatening the media

In a move pregnant with menace, Dowden dispatched a letter to BBC director general Tony Hall complaining about last week’s Panorama documentary which exposed shortages of personal protective equipment (PPE) and expressed concern that health workers will die from the Covid-19 virus.

Nothing shows the emptiness of Raab’s claims about committing to media freedom than the government’s handling of the Julian Assange case

With his government threatening the media over coronavirus in the UK, it’s no surprise that the foreign secretary has had nothing to say about Egypt’s throwing out of the country of a Guardian journalist in March after she reported on a scientific study that said the country was likely to have many more coronavirus cases than have been officially confirmed.

A foreign office spokesman came up with this: "The UK supports media freedom around the world. We have urged Egypt to guarantee freedom of expression. UK ministers have raised this case with the Egyptian authorities."

The foreign secretary has had nothing to say either about Amnesty’s bleak report yesterday revealing that Egyptian journalists are being flung into jail and accused of terrorism for reporting stories that annoy the regime of President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi.

Saudi Arabia, a British ally, jailed 26 journalists last year alone. Did the foreign office have anything to say? If so I can't find it. No wonder that Britain has dropped to 35th out of 180 countries in Reporters Without Borders’ 2020 World Freedom Index.

Last week, the foreign secretary claimed that the United Kingdom "remains committed to media freedom" during the coronavirus crisis. This, unfortunately, is not true. Nothing shows the emptiness of these claims more than the British government’s handling of the Julian Assange case.

The gory truth

 The Wikileaks founder continues to rot in Belmarsh jail as the US demands his extradition on espionage charges. If there was an ounce of sincerity in the foreign secretary’s claim that he is a supporter of media freedom, he would be resisting the US attempt to get its hands on Assange with every bone in his body.

There's not the slightest suggestion that he's doing that. As Human Rights Watch has pointed out, the British authorities have the power to prevent any US prosecution from eroding media freedom. Britain has so far - at least - shown no appetite to exercise that power. Unfortunately for Raab, Assange's real crime is doing journalism. 

Assange has done more than every other journalist in Britain put together to shed light on the way the world truly works

I’ve never met Assange. Some people that I know and respect say that he is vain and difficult. I believe them. There’s no denying, however, that Assange has done more than every other journalist in Britain put together to shed light on the way the world truly works. 

For example, thanks to Assange that we now know about many violations including: British vote-trading with Saudi Arabia to ensure that both states were elected onto the United Nations human rights council in 2013; the links between the fascist British National Party and members of the police and army; the horrifying details of civilians killed by the US army in Afghanistan.

And the US helicopter gunmen laughing as they shot and killed unarmed civilians in Iraq, including two Reuters journalists. An incident that the US military lied about, claiming at first that the dead were all insurgents.

Britain's Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab arrives in Downing Street in central London on 29 April (AFP)

I could go on and on. Vanity Fair called the release of Assange’s stories "one of the greatest journalistic scoops of last thirty years". And so it was. This wasn’t espionage, as the US claims. It was journalism.

Journalism not a crime

The US authorities aren’t out to get Assange because he’s a spy. They want him behind bars for his journalism.

That’s why the consequences are so chilling if Britain gives into the US extradition request and allows Assange to face trial in the United States. Not just for Assange, who faces a long prison sentence (up to 175 years) from which he will almost certainly never emerge. 

When we think of the repression of journalists, we automatically evoke foreign lands. We rarely, however evoke or remember our own dissidents

We should be under no illusions. If successful, the US indictment against Assange will have terrible consequences for the free press.

The charges, in the words of former Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger, look like an attempt to “criminalise things journalists regularly do as they receive and publish true information given to them by sources or whistleblowers. Assange is accused of trying to persuade a source to disclose yet more secret information. Most reporters would do the same. Then he is charged with behaviour that, on the face of it, looks like a reporter seeking to help a source protect her identity. If that’s indeed what Assange was doing, good for him.” 

Yet, British newspapers will not fight for Assange. Whether left or right, broadsheet or tabloid, British papers are agreed on one thing; they’ll fall over each other to grab the latest official hand-out about British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and his fiance Carrie Symonds' baby. Or the new Downing Street dog. 

They will, however, look the other way when it comes to standing up for press freedom and Julian Assange.

Client journalism

How pathetic. What a betrayal of their trade. Client journalism. An inversion of what newspapers stand for. If the British foreign secretary is two-faced about a free press, so are British newspaper editors who say they care about press freedom. With even less excuse. 

To be fair, it's not so much that they fail to oppose Assange's extradition. It's more that they ignore almost completely one of the most powerful threats to press freedom of modern times.

Julian Assange should be thanked - not smeared - for Wikileaks' service to journalism

 

If they did care, they’d be campaigning to keep Assange out of the clutches of the US. Meanwhile, doctors warn that Assange’s health is so bad that he may die in Belmarsh prison. 

Nils Melzer, the UN special rapporteur on torture, voiced strong concerns over the conditions of his detention, saying that "the blatant and sustained arbitrariness shown by both the judiciary and the government in this case suggests an alarming departure from the UK’s commitment to human rights and the rule of law. This is setting a worrying example, which is further reinforced by the government’s recent refusal to conduct the long-awaited judicial inquiry into British involvement in the CIA torture and rendition programme."

Kenneth Roth of Human Rights Watch has soberly noted in connection with the Assange case that "many of the acts detailed in the indictment are standard journalistic practices in the digital age. How authorities in the UK respond to the US extradition request will determine how serious a threat this prosecution poses to global media freedom."

As Assange rots in Belmarsh, how dare the British foreign secretary abuse his office by pretending to care about the liberty of the press!

I applaud a device like World Press Day. It's a way of thinking about all the journalists around the world who suffer personally for their profession, through repression, prison, torture and death. Simply because they did their job by revealing uncomfortable facts. 

When we think of the repression of journalists, we automatically evoke foreign lands - Saudi Arabia, Iran, Turkey, Egypt. We rarely, however evoke or remember our own dissidents. 

Julian Assange is one of them.

The views expressed in this article belong to the author and do not necessarily reflect the editorial policy of Middle East Eye.

Peter Oborne

Peter Oborne won best commentary/blogging in 2017 and was named freelancer of the year in 2016 at the Online Media Awards for articles he wrote for Middle East Eye. He also was British Press Awards Columnist of the Year 2013. He resigned as chief political columnist of the Daily Telegraph in 2015. His books include The Triumph of the Political Class, The Rise of Political Lying, and Why the West is Wrong about Nuclear Iran.

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.middleeasteye.net/opinion/press-freedom-day-us-after-julian-assange-his-journalism

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You can't get anywhere if you didn't start from something tangible… 'Viruses' are a 250 y/o myth… Then beside population control, world domination is either the ultimate goal or the main concern to a superpower's leader…

 

Trump just called the WHO China's 'puppet' and threatens to stop its US funding once for all, accusing the Chinese of using The Organization to cover China's evil plan of taking over the world and crippling the mankind with the Communism 'virus'…

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dUr4F5N26UU

 

 

But the US are engaged in a media and economic war against BRIC and China over world domination through world trade, then where's the bias and what should the public believe ?

 

Would the US be kind enough to get the world rid of the WHO, its authorities and all subsidiaries forever, then the world should be grateful to them even if it's at the price of a roll-back of China's development about which I bet most the Chinese themselves couldn't care less as it won't change their life, the benefit going to the same empowered and corrupted elites as in any other country of the world…

 

But it won't solve the problem, just postpone it to the best, and it's maybe why we people will have to suffer the medical terror propaganda with its 'new social deal' and vaccine threat upon us until maybe a THIRD WORLD WAR happen because it's how it will all have to end anyway…

 

In term of military power I'm not sure even the UN and the US together can compete with the BRIC after the currently available data or then it'd be over within a few hours, because who can tell what fire power countries like Russia or China really own today ?

 

So maybe we people crawling in the streets all over the world have even worse to worry about in addition to vaccines, and it will last as long as some insane megalomaniacs will insist on owning and ruling the planet at all costs… They can try and prevent developing countries like India or China from growing further for a while, but they won't EVER stop the BRIC from defending itself or striking in last resort…

 

Something suggests that the Starlink program wasn't just intended for 'space tourism', so there's actually a group, a kind, a 'cult' of people or whatever you call them who're now being leading the mankind to something like what the Terminator franchise's main titles show, and it will sure look much less theatrical than in the movies : one last and final world war involving 4 superpowers using today's weapons, a war of which first blasts will not even sound like what WWII ended by…

 

That said, to all a good night… :classic_mellow:

 

 

(:classic_laugh:)

 

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Israel

 

Iranian shipping in Strait of Hormuz ‘crippled by Israeli cyberattack’

Shahid Rajaee, near the city of Bandar Abbas, was brought to a standstill by the cyberattack

GETTY IMAGES

Catherine Philp, Diplomatic Correspondent

Tuesday May 19 2020, 5.00pm, The Times

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Israel is suspected of launching a cyberattack that crippled Iranian shipping through the Strait of Hormuz for days, in an apparent retaliation after an attempt to crash Israeli water purification facilities.

Computers regulating the flow of traffic on waterways and roads leading to the Shahid Rajaee port crashed simultaneously on May 9, creating chaos and backups. Satellite images showed stranded container ships at sea as well as miles-long queues of lorries on roads leading to the port.

Iran acknowledged the work of a foreign hacker but downplayed its impact. Intelligence officials have now told The Washington Post that the cyberattack was the work of Israel and had caused far more damage and disruption than the Islamic Republic admitted. “There was total disarray,” one official from an unnamed foreign government said.

The attack was a deep embarrassment for Iran, given its frequent boasts about its power to close down shipping through the Strait of Hormuz, a leading conduit for oil. The incident did not prevent other shipping from passing through but disrupted operations in Shahid Rajaee for days.

A day before the cyberattack two rural water distribution networks in Israel were hacked but the intrusion was detected and cut off before any damage could be done.

Israel has long had a policy of aggressive retaliation towards Iran, seeking to demonstrate that the cost of any attack will be too high. The Shahid Rajaee retaliation is a cyber equivalent of the punishing strikes Israel has conducted on Iranian targets in Syria as warnings not to use territory or weapons there to threaten it.

Cyberattacks have also proved a low-cost, lower-risk means for Israel to contain Iran. Israeli and American cyberoperatives worked jointly on the Stuxnet computer worm used to slow down and damage Iran’s nuclear facilities rather than resort to risky military action.

Computers regulating the flow of traffic on waterways and roads leading to the Shahid Rajaee port crashed simultaneously on May 9, creating chaos and backups

GETTY IMAGES

Amos Yadlin, Israel’s former chief of defence intelligence, said that the apparent tit-for-tat attacks represented a new evolution for the use of technology in warfare. “Cyber is now being integrated to the ground, sea and aerial dimensions of combat as a major domain of war fighting,” he wrote on Twitter. “If this cyberattack was indeed Israel’s response to the Iranian attack on civilian infrastructure, Israel is sending an important message to Iran regarding the vulnerability of key elements of Iran’s economy to Israeli cyber capabilities.”

Tensions between the Middle East enemies have continued even as Iran has struggled with its coronavirus response. Israel has intensified its strikes on Iranian targets in Syria in the past few weeks in an effort to hasten its withdrawal from the conflict.

Iran has worked hard on its own cybercapabilities as an asymmetric weapon in its confrontations with more powerful conventional adversaries such as Israel and the United Stated. Cyberattacks in the US that were traced back to Iran tripled in the aftermath of the assassination of Iran’s most powerful general, Qasem Soleimani, in January.

• The US Navy has warned it will take defensive measures against vessels that come within 100 metres of its warships, offering specific guidelines after a recent close encounter with Iranian boats in the Gulf. Defensive measures have typically included shooting off flares and ultimately firing warning shots. Setting a specific distance is new for the Navy.

Israel

Middle East

Media

 

 

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