Jump to content

Coronavirus Mega-Thread.


numnuts

Recommended Posts

44 minutes ago, rebornsteve said:

One excess death occurred for every 1642 administered vaccine doses (95% CI: 1477-1808 doses).

 

Between the time of their introduction to the market until the end of 2022 a total of 191,029,491 COVID-19 vaccine doses were administered in Germany according to RKI figures. This translates to 116,309 vaccinees who died as a direct consequence of receiving a dose of the nucleotide-based vaccines against COVID-19 in Germany (95% CI: 105,669 - 129,331).

https://vigilance.pervaers.com/p/german-excess-mortality-part-3

 

 

Mindblowing. It's like watching a horror show in real time.

 

6f65623a-5e6f-4dd2-b7cf-6527cd8150b3_1352x876.webp

Edited by Freaky Dragonfly
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hydroxychloroquine stelt virussen in staat om kankercellen aan te vallen terwijl gezonde cellen gezond blijven. Dit lijkt mij informatie die het publiek verdient te weten en je vraagt je af waarom ze deze gegevens in het onderzoek probeerden te verdoezelen.  het verdienmodel
 
Hydroxychloroquine allows viruses to attack cancer cells while keeping healthy cells healthy. This strikes me as information the public deserves to know and it makes you wonder why they tried to cover up this data in the investigation. the revenue model
 
 
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A new Contact Tracers Company has been set-up called Visual Observers Yanking End User Rights(VOYEUR) with Governement funding, in preperation for the next plandemic, to Observe everyones toilet behaviour as scientist have conclude that the one of the main spread of Covid is thru fecal matter and instead of mandating Butt-plug usage which was voted down by consersative MP's who stated "Arses are exit only zones", even thou Liberal & Labour MP's re-buttalled with "That has never stopped you from stuffing the publics arse for decades".
It was considered better to monitor spread thru Contact Tracers rather than restrict MP's nocturnal habits and will allow auto fixed penalties for all those that violate Not washing there hands after a Toilet visit.
The VOYEUR company will now have access to every ones cell phones with the Aid of GCHQ's spyware enabling the to turn on Video cameras and record when they are geo-located near to any Toilets.
The data will be watched by A.I. and Concerned MP's in there Local Constituencies who have made promises never to share data on Torrent sites or the darkweb.
Civil liberty group, Studying Healthier Interest in Toilet Training(SHITT) have stated, "This is outrageous violation of civil liberty and totally unfair, Every one should have the right to Observe the data and not a select few".
Other groups have also joined in on the debate stating "That this will turn our streets into San Francisco, making people poop on the public streets to avoid being caught on camera. And SHITT is pooping Shite, as the majority of us do not want to watch other peoples toilet habits"
Governments state "That is ridculous, We have every square inch of public space covered with CCTV already, We just need to get into bathroom, so we can generate revenue from bad habits, before we move into the bedrooms to start sex-taxing."

 

1120807489_smileyouroncamera.jpg.0f2a7b74d0c1baaabf6c3bbaebcb7adc.jpg

 

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

31 minutes ago, TheConsultant said:
Hydroxychloroquine stelt virussen in staat om kankercellen aan te vallen terwijl gezonde cellen gezond blijven. Dit lijkt mij informatie die het publiek verdient te weten en je vraagt je af waarom ze deze gegevens in het onderzoek probeerden te verdoezelen.  het verdienmodel
 
Hydroxychloroquine allows viruses to attack cancer cells while keeping healthy cells healthy. This strikes me as information the public deserves to know and it makes you wonder why they tried to cover up this data in the investigation. the revenue model
 
 

 

https://www.ndtv.com/feature/son-of-murdered-canadian-billionaire-couple-offers-a-whopping-35-million-reward-to-help-catch-killer-3620973

 

Son of largest producer of generic HGQ double murder couple triples the award for information associated with their murder. 

 

https://capforcanada.com/was-apotex-owner-barry-sherman-murdered-for-interfering-in-big-pharma-profits/

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barry_Sherman

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Looks like they’ve developed a vaccine to undo the damage of THE vaccine. When will it end? 
 

Anti-ageing gene injections could rewind your heart age by 10 years

Healthy mutant gene in super-fit people can reverse the decline of heart performance in the elderly, according to a study

 

https://apple.news/A6FCHwk6VRdewy-NJcC3GVA

 

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

University funded pro vax counter conspiracy techniques.
 

Indoctrination for the nation.

(Look who funded this, at the bottom of the article)

 

How to talk to someone about conspiracy theories in five simple steps

People’s first instinct when engaging with conspiracy believers is often to try and debunk their ideas with factual and authoritative information.

However, direct confrontation rarely works. Conspiracy theories are persuasive, often playing on people’s feelings and sense of identity. Even if debunking conspiracy theories was effective, it’s difficult to keep up with how quickly they appear and how widespread they travel. A study showed that during 2015 and 2016, the number of propagators of Zika virus conspiracy theories on Twitter twice outnumbered debunkers.

But research into how to talk with conspiracy believers is beginning to show returns. We’ve developed some conversation prompts to use with people you know or only meet in passing. But first, if you want to address someone’s conspiracy beliefs you need to consider the root causes.

People are attracted to conspiracy theories in an attempt to satisfy three psychological needs. They want more certainty, to feel in control, and maintain a positive image of their self and group. During times of crisis, such as the COVID pandemic, these needs are more frustrated and people’s desire to make sense of the world becomes more urgent.

Yet, conspiracy beliefs do not seem to satisfy these psychological needs and may actually make things worse for people, increasing their uncertainty and anxiety. Conspiracy theories don’t just affect people’s state of mind, they can also impact behaviour.

For instance, people who believe in anti-vaccine conspiracy theories - such as the idea that pharmaceutical companies cover up the dangers of vaccines - reported more negative attitudes towards vaccinations and an increased feeling of powerlessness one month later. This is what makes it so important to reach out to conspiracy believers.

What we’ve learned

One important tool to reduce conspiracy beliefs is the power of social norms. People overestimate how much others believe in conspiracy theories, which influences how intensely they buy in themselves. A study in 2021 found that countering this misconception with information about what people actually believe diluted the strength of anti-vaccine conspiracy beliefs among a sample of UK adults.

Inoculation is a promising route, too. Giving people factual information in advance of exposure to conspiracy theories can reduce belief in them. This approach could work well in cases like vaccination where people might not think much about the issue before it becomes important to them (for example when they need to decide whether to have their children vaccinated).

You can inoculate yourself too. Research has found that the way people think about control can reduce the likelihood they will subscribe to conspiracy theories. People who are focused on achieving goals find conspiracy theories less appealing than those who fixate on protecting what they already have. The authors of this paper argued that concentrating on shaping your future fosters a sense of control, which reduces conspiracy beliefs.

To help with those difficult discussions with conspiracy believers we developed some evidence-based conversation starters.

1. Be open-minded

An open-minded approach starts with asking questions and listening. It builds understanding with the person. Listen carefully, and avoid defending your own beliefs. Ask questions like this:

2. Be receptive

Work on what psychologists call conversational receptiveness to foster empathy which can bridge the gap between the beliefs you each hold. Say things like:

3. Critical thinking

Affirm the value of critical thinking.

If the person you’re talking to already perceives themselves as a critical thinker, redirect this skill towards a deeper examination of the conspiracy theory itself. For example:

4. Conspiracy theories aren’t the norm

Highlight how conspiracy theories are not as commonplace as people might think.

Readdressing social norms can help address people’s need to protect a group they identify with. Such as:

5. Think about what can be controlled

Encourage them to be forward-focused and inspire them to put their energy into areas of their life where they experience more control, like this:

These conversations can be difficult, but they are crucial. Using an empathetic, understanding, and open-minded approach will nurture trust. Research shows that gaining someone’s confidence is important to preventing radicalisation.

Reassure the person if they feel uncertain, make them feel more in control if they are worried or powerless, and help them make social connections if they feel isolated.

Daniel Jolley

Assistant Professor in Social Psychology, University of Nottingham

Karen Douglas

Professor of Social Psychology, University of Kent

Mathew Marques

Senior Lecturer in Social Psychology, La Trobe University

Disclosure statement

Daniel Jolley has received funding from the British Academy and Not Equal.

Karen Douglas has received funding from the European Research Council, Leverhulme Trust, British Academy, Australian Research Council, and the Economic and Social Research Council.

Mathew Marques is a member of National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance Social Science Advisory Group.

Partners

University of Nottingham provides funding as a founding partner of The Conversation UK.

La Trobe University provides funding as a member of The Conversation AU.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 minutes ago, LastOneLeftInTheCounty said:

University funded pro vax counter conspiracy techniques.
 

Indoctrination for the nation.

(Look who funded this, at the bottom of the article)

 

How to talk to someone about conspiracy theories in five simple steps

People’s first instinct when engaging with conspiracy believers is often to try and debunk their ideas with factual and authoritative information.

However, direct confrontation rarely works. Conspiracy theories are persuasive, often playing on people’s feelings and sense of identity. Even if debunking conspiracy theories was effective, it’s difficult to keep up with how quickly they appear and how widespread they travel. A study showed that during 2015 and 2016, the number of propagators of Zika virus conspiracy theories on Twitter twice outnumbered debunkers.

But research into how to talk with conspiracy believers is beginning to show returns. We’ve developed some conversation prompts to use with people you know or only meet in passing. But first, if you want to address someone’s conspiracy beliefs you need to consider the root causes.

People are attracted to conspiracy theories in an attempt to satisfy three psychological needs. They want more certainty, to feel in control, and maintain a positive image of their self and group. During times of crisis, such as the COVID pandemic, these needs are more frustrated and people’s desire to make sense of the world becomes more urgent.

Yet, conspiracy beliefs do not seem to satisfy these psychological needs and may actually make things worse for people, increasing their uncertainty and anxiety. Conspiracy theories don’t just affect people’s state of mind, they can also impact behaviour.

For instance, people who believe in anti-vaccine conspiracy theories - such as the idea that pharmaceutical companies cover up the dangers of vaccines - reported more negative attitudes towards vaccinations and an increased feeling of powerlessness one month later. This is what makes it so important to reach out to conspiracy believers.

What we’ve learned

One important tool to reduce conspiracy beliefs is the power of social norms. People overestimate how much others believe in conspiracy theories, which influences how intensely they buy in themselves. A study in 2021 found that countering this misconception with information about what people actually believe diluted the strength of anti-vaccine conspiracy beliefs among a sample of UK adults.

Inoculation is a promising route, too. Giving people factual information in advance of exposure to conspiracy theories can reduce belief in them. This approach could work well in cases like vaccination where people might not think much about the issue before it becomes important to them (for example when they need to decide whether to have their children vaccinated).

You can inoculate yourself too. Research has found that the way people think about control can reduce the likelihood they will subscribe to conspiracy theories. People who are focused on achieving goals find conspiracy theories less appealing than those who fixate on protecting what they already have. The authors of this paper argued that concentrating on shaping your future fosters a sense of control, which reduces conspiracy beliefs.

To help with those difficult discussions with conspiracy believers we developed some evidence-based conversation starters.

1. Be open-minded

An open-minded approach starts with asking questions and listening. It builds understanding with the person. Listen carefully, and avoid defending your own beliefs. Ask questions like this:

2. Be receptive

Work on what psychologists call conversational receptiveness to foster empathy which can bridge the gap between the beliefs you each hold. Say things like:

3. Critical thinking

Affirm the value of critical thinking.

If the person you’re talking to already perceives themselves as a critical thinker, redirect this skill towards a deeper examination of the conspiracy theory itself. For example:

4. Conspiracy theories aren’t the norm

Highlight how conspiracy theories are not as commonplace as people might think.

Readdressing social norms can help address people’s need to protect a group they identify with. Such as:

5. Think about what can be controlled

Encourage them to be forward-focused and inspire them to put their energy into areas of their life where they experience more control, like this:

These conversations can be difficult, but they are crucial. Using an empathetic, understanding, and open-minded approach will nurture trust. Research shows that gaining someone’s confidence is important to preventing radicalisation.

Reassure the person if they feel uncertain, make them feel more in control if they are worried or powerless, and help them make social connections if they feel isolated.

Daniel Jolley

Assistant Professor in Social Psychology, University of Nottingham

Karen Douglas

Professor of Social Psychology, University of Kent

Mathew Marques

Senior Lecturer in Social Psychology, La Trobe University

Disclosure statement

Daniel Jolley has received funding from the British Academy and Not Equal.

Karen Douglas has received funding from the European Research Council, Leverhulme Trust, British Academy, Australian Research Council, and the Economic and Social Research Council.

Mathew Marques is a member of National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance Social Science Advisory Group.

Partners

University of Nottingham provides funding as a founding partner of The Conversation UK.

La Trobe University provides funding as a member of The Conversation AU.

 

Oh dear,  dear,    dear !

 

th?id=OIP.H93CHzTYMwUZM8CKK7CiEAAAAA&pid=Api&P=0

 

Edited by Nip
  • Like 1
  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, LastOneLeftInTheCounty said:

Bankrupt Broadcasting Creeps, or as Matt Le Tissier put it, the PPC, the Paedophile Protecting Corporation. 
 

So are you suggesting we here on the DI Social Forum stand as MPs? That’s an interesting idea! I heard somewhere you need 50,000 signatures from constituents or was it £50,000? One or both of the two- not sure: 

Maybe David himself should stand as an MP, he’ll easily get 50,000 signatures and tha £. 
 

The murky world of politics would suit most of us on here! 

 

I understand Heritage patty need candidates to stand too 

 

https://heritageparty.org/

 

I always used to sit outside the punch and Judy show and watch in disbelief but now 

?

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, Talorgan said:

 

I understand Heritage patty need candidates to stand too 

 

https://heritageparty.org/

 

I always used to sit outside the punch and Judy show and watch in disbelief but now 

?

That’s the way to do it! The Heritage Party looks and sounds like a politically correct version of UKIP.
 

Fuck all of that I’m going into unvaxxed sperm donation

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...