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Well, we're all fucked now! ...

 

Defence contractor BAE Systems wins Home Office contract

An illustration suggesting an online search

Credit: Gerd Altmann/Pixabay   Image has been cropped

 

The government has signed a £2m contract with a supplier to help build a national system intended to allow authorities to search for and obtain citizens’ internet records from communications firms.

 

The plan to develop the nationwide system – which will build on trials embarked upon with two unnamed internet service providers in 2019 – were recently revealed in a procurement notice. 

 

The service is intended to provide a means for law-enforcement agencies to search and, ultimately, gain access to data on individuals’ internet connection records (ICR) – information that, since the 2016 introduction of the Investigatory Powers Act, telecoms firms can now be legally compelled to store for a year.

 

While an ICR does not provide a full browsing history including individual webpages, it contains information on all sites visited or apps accessed by a user, as well as details of the device used and the time and date of the visit. A user’s IP address and their customer account information with the telecoms provider in question is also embedded in the records.

 

The Digital Intelligence sub-division of global defence firm BAE Systems has now been appointed to a contract for “the transition and build of a filtering arrangement and results platform” that police and other authorities will be able to use to search ICR databases.

 

The contract notice outlines that the search capability to be used nationally will, where possible, build on systems that were built as part of the trials. The “technical migration team” that the BAE unit has been hired to provide “will be responsible for the technical implementation of the national service… working in line with the expectation that a private beta version of the filtering arrangement and results platform capability will be available for use against telecom operator data by the end of 2022”.

 

A recently published update to the procurement notice reveals that a contract with the defence firm, worth an estimated £2m, was signed on 14 July by the National Communications Data Service (NCDS), a little-publicised unit that sits within the Home Office’s counter-terror operations and whose remit – as described in another procurement notice – is “providing the nominated representatives of law enforcement agencies and wider public authorities with access to retained communications data in accordance with legislation”.

 

BAE Systems Digital Intelligence is expected to fulfil an initial six-month statement of work from NCDS which, if deemed successful, will extend into a two-year engagement.

 

The team to be provided by the supplier will include a product manager, scrum master, a security architect, a lead developer, two developers, and two DevOps workers. This team will work with a Home Office team including both civil servants and other contractors.

 

Once the full national service is complete, it will enable investigators to have “access to ICR data, so that [they] can use it to support criminal investigations and identify where [they] may need to send requests for other data on other systems”.

 

There has been no formal announcement from the government about the decision to go ahead with a national service that could seemingly allow police to access on demand large parts of citizens’ internet histories.

 

For an exclusive report earlier this year breaking news of the ICR platform, PublicTechnology contacted the Home Office and the National Crime Agency – the organisations which jointly conducted the earlier trials – as well as the watchdog responsible for overseeing communications surveillance. We also contacted the UK’s 16 leading broadband providers and mobile network operators, and the primary trade industry body for ISPs.

None of these organisations answered any of our questions or provided any comment or additional information on what the service will entail, their organisation’s role or participation in its operation, whether police will need a court order to search databases of internet connection records (ICRs), or the implications for citizens’ privacy and data security.

 

BAE Systems has not provided comment for this story.

 

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15 hours ago, Greenhulk50 said:

That's a good idea as I read these masks are multi layered and thicker than the other surgical mask. 

Even the blue masks are triple layer. When I had to travel in 2020, I removed 2 layers leaving one very thin layer. 

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2 hours ago, webtrekker said:

Well, we're all fucked now! ...

 

Defence contractor BAE Systems wins Home Office contract

An illustration suggesting an online search

Credit: Gerd Altmann/Pixabay   Image has been cropped

 

The government has signed a £2m contract with a supplier to help build a national system intended to allow authorities to search for and obtain citizens’ internet records from communications firms.

 

The plan to develop the nationwide system – which will build on trials embarked upon with two unnamed internet service providers in 2019 – were recently revealed in a procurement notice. 

 

The service is intended to provide a means for law-enforcement agencies to search and, ultimately, gain access to data on individuals’ internet connection records (ICR) – information that, since the 2016 introduction of the Investigatory Powers Act, telecoms firms can now be legally compelled to store for a year.

 

While an ICR does not provide a full browsing history including individual webpages, it contains information on all sites visited or apps accessed by a user, as well as details of the device used and the time and date of the visit. A user’s IP address and their customer account information with the telecoms provider in question is also embedded in the records.

 

The Digital Intelligence sub-division of global defence firm BAE Systems has now been appointed to a contract for “the transition and build of a filtering arrangement and results platform” that police and other authorities will be able to use to search ICR databases.

 

The contract notice outlines that the search capability to be used nationally will, where possible, build on systems that were built as part of the trials. The “technical migration team” that the BAE unit has been hired to provide “will be responsible for the technical implementation of the national service… working in line with the expectation that a private beta version of the filtering arrangement and results platform capability will be available for use against telecom operator data by the end of 2022”.

 

A recently published update to the procurement notice reveals that a contract with the defence firm, worth an estimated £2m, was signed on 14 July by the National Communications Data Service (NCDS), a little-publicised unit that sits within the Home Office’s counter-terror operations and whose remit – as described in another procurement notice – is “providing the nominated representatives of law enforcement agencies and wider public authorities with access to retained communications data in accordance with legislation”.

 

BAE Systems Digital Intelligence is expected to fulfil an initial six-month statement of work from NCDS which, if deemed successful, will extend into a two-year engagement.

 

The team to be provided by the supplier will include a product manager, scrum master, a security architect, a lead developer, two developers, and two DevOps workers. This team will work with a Home Office team including both civil servants and other contractors.

 

Once the full national service is complete, it will enable investigators to have “access to ICR data, so that [they] can use it to support criminal investigations and identify where [they] may need to send requests for other data on other systems”.

 

There has been no formal announcement from the government about the decision to go ahead with a national service that could seemingly allow police to access on demand large parts of citizens’ internet histories.

 

For an exclusive report earlier this year breaking news of the ICR platform, PublicTechnology contacted the Home Office and the National Crime Agency – the organisations which jointly conducted the earlier trials – as well as the watchdog responsible for overseeing communications surveillance. We also contacted the UK’s 16 leading broadband providers and mobile network operators, and the primary trade industry body for ISPs.

None of these organisations answered any of our questions or provided any comment or additional information on what the service will entail, their organisation’s role or participation in its operation, whether police will need a court order to search databases of internet connection records (ICRs), or the implications for citizens’ privacy and data security.

 

BAE Systems has not provided comment for this story.

 

 

 

Encrypted DNS such as Quad9 will help:

https://www.quad9.net/news/blog/enable-private-dns-using-quad9-on-android-9/

 

Plus a VPN is good.

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5 hours ago, Mikhail Liebestein said:

 

 

Encrypted DNS such as Quad9 will help:

https://www.quad9.net/news/blog/enable-private-dns-using-quad9-on-android-9/

 

Plus a VPN is good.

 

Hmmm. My son in law is a computer programme writer and he said he's just got a job on more money than he earned previously (which was still a good income). I wondered what he'd be doing but got side-tracked from asking at the family get together. He said I may be approached re his security check. (I haven't been). So I will delve further into the above. 🤨

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35 minutes ago, Mikhail Liebestein said:

 

 

Encrypted DNS such as Quad9 will help:

https://www.quad9.net/news/blog/enable-private-dns-using-quad9-on-android-9/

 

Plus a VPN is good.

A word of caution on the Quad9 website, pointing out that the first version of their product is likely to have flaws:

Caveats and Finding about Private DNS in Android (*)

Small print: You may find that not 100% of your queries are protected with Private DNS in this version of Android. There are are some queries that may “leak” through after your device wakes from sleep mode for about 30 seconds, as well as some cases that we’ve observed where the encryption isn’t stable in this release, which means downgrading back to standard unencrypted DNS without notice to the user. Remember this is the first implementation of this feature for Android... 

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5 hours ago, Tinfoil Hat said:

 

Hmmm. My son in law is a computer programme writer and he said he's just got a job on more money than he earned previously (which was still a good income). I wondered what he'd be doing but got side-tracked from asking at the family get together. He said I may be approached re his security check. (I haven't been). So I will delve further into the above. 🤨

 

You shouldn't mention the company name. 

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I place this here for the connection to lies, scandals, and pharmaceuticals.

 

I just heard on LBC News channel; Jason Evans who was talking about the Haemophilia contaminated blood scandal. He mentioned the pharmaceutical companies, and that they had replaced blood transfusions with medication? Sounded very interesting.

 

This is his website 

 

https://www.factor8scandal.uk/jason-evans

 

https://smk.org.uk/awards_nominations/factor8jasonevans/

 

Two quotes from this website;

 

As Jason puts it, ‘I think something that fuelled our renewed campaign was a new energy, particularly from those whose parents had died, we were grown up now, and we were angry. I think that energy spread to the older campaigners who had been let down by the Government time and time again.’

 

"My advice to any campaigner would be to have a real passion for your cause. From my experience, especially if you’re going against the powers that be, you can’t just dabble or treat it like a job you don’t want to be doing. That’s what’s going to make you answer your phone at 9pm, jump on a train tomorrow to be at the crucial meeting, or sacrifice a whole weekend to work on an urgent press release and strategy.” Jason Evans.

 

I also saw this on Twitter;

 

It’s not often you hear admission that a government lied. I believe now, more than ever, that the wall of #ContaminatedBlood cover-up has officially crumbled.
@Factor8Campaign
Jul 27
This morning @Jeremy_Hunt has admitted to @bloodinquiry that the state lied about the #ContaminatedBlood scandal. That's the second health minister in as many weeks following @AndyBurnhamGM evidence.

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On 7/29/2022 at 2:25 AM, Tinfoil Hat said:

A good few people I know have said they won't have the booster - then they add that they only had the jab(s) so that they could go on holiday. My mind boggles at that. 

🤪 Don't trust in it, but I need to go to Majorca for a week, so here's my blood-stream, pump whatever poisonous filth in it you will! 🙈

 

In Australia, you don't need jabs for anything now. Those idiots who couldn't wait and took their jabs so they could go into pubs, clubs, etc, are suddenly looking pretty stupid. Anyone can walk in now, jabbed or unjabbed.

 

The general feeling I get is that they mostly realise they were duped and it was all a scam, but they're too ashamed to admit it. Then again, you have lots of people who were forced into it against their will at threat of losing employment; they are feeling pretty screwed over that the few remaining unjabbed can just walk in these days and go back to work, no questions asked.

 

Biggest scam of all time. Even the dumbest of all the sheep are starting to figure that out, but either way, it's too late. Their blood is contaminated and there is no turning back. Those who were forced, I feel sorry for. But those who supported the whole medical apartheid enthusiastically, they can get fucked. No sympathy.

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1 hour ago, Macnamara said:

 

some very interesting numbers there from hugo.....

 

72 is also a significant number. King solomon is said to have tamed 72 demons in the goetia

Read your Sitchin. Goes loads into the significance of numbers and why the Sumerian system was more logical and significant

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10 minutes ago, DarianF said:

 

In Australia, you don't need jabs for anything now. Those idiots who couldn't wait and took their jabs so they could go into pubs, clubs, etc, are suddenly looking pretty stupid. Anyone can walk in now, jabbed or unjabbed.

 

The general feeling I get is that they mostly realise they were duped and it was all a scam, but they're too ashamed to admit it. Then again, you have lots of people who were forced into it against their will at threat of losing employment; they are feeling pretty screwed over that the few remaining unjabbed can just walk in these days and go back to work, no questions asked.

 

Biggest scam of all time. Even the dumbest of all the sheep are starting to figure that out, but either way, it's too late. Their blood is contaminated and there is no turning back. Those who were forced, I feel sorry for. But those who supported the whole medical apartheid enthusiastically, they can get fucked. No sympathy.

the entire medical personal can get fucked, bunch of traitors that clearly showed what we all knew, Doctors are only in it for the money (and prestige and all sorts of Ego Delusions)

Edited by Youknownothingbutyou
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2 minutes ago, Youknownothingbutyou said:

the entire medical personal can get fucked, bunch of traitors that clearly showed what we all knew, Doctors are only in it for the money (and prestige and all sorts of Ego Delusions)

 

The very rare exceptions where honourable doctors refused to go along with it aside, I agree, they can all get fucked. 99.99% of the bastards. Never to be trusted or respected, ever again.

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18 minutes ago, rebornsteve said:

Scientific proof that the mRNA causes cancer.

 

But we haven't even seen the tip of the iceberg. The worst is yet to come for the young women who succumbed….


Joel Smalley.

https://metatron.substack.com/p/scientific-proof-that-the-mrna-causes?utm_source=email

 

 From their perspective They choose spike protein which was very bad idea either without knowing long (and short) term consequences or at some level  knowing this was bad news  but experimented on whole world anyway .

Or already knew this at some level and it is deliberate planning .

 

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2 hours ago, bamboozooka said:

Bidens got the coof again.

twice in 2 weeks

Been jabbed more than a pincushion, yet young, healthy athletes can't get through a game without keeling over from their clot shot hearts. Somebody get Brandon a jersey and some cleats, for cryin' out loud!

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