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I was considering trying to flee to Australia, but the police out there have gone absolutely crazy over this fake virus.They were always a bit OTT like the UK from what I heard but this took many people by surprise including myself. I think we allowed these large governments and police to fester and fester until eventually they had the perfect opportunity to live out their totalitarian dreams and all the infrastructure was already in place to support it. 

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8 minutes ago, SimonTV said:

I was considering trying to flee to Australia, but the police out there have gone absolutely crazy over this fake virus.They were always a bit OTT like the UK from what I heard but this took many people by surprise including myself. I think we allowed these large governments and police to fester and fester until eventually they had the perfect opportunity to live out their totalitarian dreams and all the infrastructure was already in place to support it. 

 

Go to South Dakota in the USA; see vid by Governor Noem on previous page.

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Advance New Zealand Receives years second biggest political donation.

 

In the article they state ‘Te Kahika has a number of controversial views, including that Covid-19 was a bioweapon designed to be used on civilians around the world.’

 

Which is utter bullshit; Billy has gone out of his way not to say things like that.

Lying c...s.

 

https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12359062

 

Also just watched his days round up vid and he is having livestream interviews with Dr Rashid Buttar and Del Bigtree together next week I think he said; and then a couple of weeks or so later, another one with Robert Kennedy Jr.

Bloody marvellous!

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@Mr H group think and cognitive dissonance.  

 

I called an elderly relative out of respect to see if she needed anything due to lockdown a few months back. I know she has other people around her and a young person living with her but I called anyway. 

 

 

She then asked me what I thought about it and I told her I think it's over the top and look at Sweden. I thought maybe this would put her mind at ease. But I got "oh don't be ridiculous you are one of those conspiracy theorists, people are dying, you are annoying me now". 

 

So what is one to do. I didn't get a thanks either for checking in on her, just got anger. I wouldn't have minded but she asked ME! 

 

I don't wish to be in contact with someone like that.. 

 

My other elderly relatives who aren't toxic are scared and have brought the fear but don't mind differing opinions I just try not to shove it down them. But they know my feelings towards it all and as far as I know do not resent me for it. 

 

You have got to weed out the generally scared silver tops to the branch covidion types. Most of the silver tops have been gaslighted and scared shirtless so I don't blame them to a certain extent. But I won't deal with shitty behaviour either. 

 

It's a great red pill mate and you are witnessing  the true nature of those around you. Your community, family friends. Some good, some the mask is slipping.  

 

 

 

 

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2 minutes ago, EnigmaticWorld said:

EgIoV_bXkAAn28Q.jpg.c0f9aaae73de43dc5d7d54ebcf384809.jpg

A whole new level of ridiculous. Do their instruments have to be sanitised and disinfected after every performance too? Because I'm sure those things must be brimming with Covid...

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"Just a coincidence, nothing to worry about" - David Icke.

 

I caught a glimpse of the Event 201 recently on YouTube that was held in October 2019.
This obviously took many months to organise such an event and therefore it wasn't just before the pandemic, but I found it quite spooky as it is based on a version of the corona virus outlining potential flu like symptoms and how the world could change dramatically as a result of such a pandemic, and almost like a virtual run through of what we are experiencing now.
 

I find it very difficult to comprehend how many of these random type simulations are so like the real thing and as an example September 11th 2001, they were running typical scenarios actually on the day and so much so that many on the front line claimed they were confused at what was actual real world events and exercise, and in some cases used it as an actual excuse to why they didn't respond quickly enough.
9/11 appeared to me to be the first of many major events at the turn of this new century to break society and re-model it as part of an agenda (agenda 21 perhaps).


The 7/7 bombings in London are another example where even one of their own 'simulation' staff/directors were saying that it was beyond coincidence as the target scenarios were virtually identical in type and actual location to what actually happened on that day.  This further brings home how 'compartmentalised' the system must be when even officials seem rather bemused in how events actually unfolded in real time, in comparison to the actual simulation that they were a part of - surely many must they must feel a little duped or suspicious and as they have illegally taken 'journalists' like Julian Assange out of the mix, it offers one less place to be able to blow that particular whistle.

 

I don't rate myself as a conspiracy theorist in the same way as the mainstream are trying to use the label and denigrate anyone for asking simple questions, and there has definately been a change on that score since this particular pandemic started, but there has got to be something wrong when your natural intuition for right or wrong or something being out of line, is constantly being tested - people really do need to find the courage to tune back in.

Not really sure if the masses are waking up or in fact they will wake up as we create a new generation of zombie who can't even remember 9/11 and a place now where there are far too many mainstream distractions to take you away from current events.  This particular distraction I am sure was the 'Black Lives Matter' protests but maybe they should have been protesting that 'All Lives Matter' while they were penning in their banners and arranging gatherings on their smart-phones produced now by the BIGGEST company in the world that uses modern slavery to boost their recent 2 trillion valuation!!  Kids today eh - whatever happened to joining the dots...

 

In the meantime the other global mankind fear scenario also known as global warming, or when they found we weren't warming for the last 20 years it was changed to man made climate change, seems to have been put on the back burner since this pandemic kicked off.  The MSMedia forces have certainly been utilised to punch this sucker home good and proper, and I guess this offers a much quicker result than waiting for humanity and the almighty Al Gore to drown under the weight of his own prize winning predictions.

 

Sorry for the overwaffle 🤪 

 

Here is an important and thought provoking film on 9/11 in case anyone hasn't seen it.....
 


 

Edited by alex67
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EUGENICS IN ACTION IN UK 2020

 

 

CORONAVIRUS

Care homes ‘ordered not to resuscitate’ as coronavirus pandemic took hold

 

Hannah Mays

Monday August 24 2020, 12.01am, The Times

Care homes were asked to introduce blanket “do not resuscitate” orders for all residents at the height of the coronavirus pandemic, it has been claimed.

The Queen’s Nursing Institute (QNI), a charity promoting community nursing, found that one in ten care homes were ordered to introduce the measure without discussion with staff, family members or the residents. It was intended to help keep hospital beds free.

Half of staff members who said that they had been asked to change DNRs worked in homes for people with learning or cognitive disabilities. The other half worked in homes for the elderly.

Alison Leary, professor of healthcare and workforce modelling at London South Bank University and the author of the report, described the findings as worrying and called for an inquiry.

The survey of 128 care home managers and nurses also found that during March and April one fifth received residents from the hospital sector who had tested positive for coronavirus. Almost half said that they had been sent residents from hospitals before they had been tested, and one third said that they had not always had access to appropriate personal protective equipment.

When asked about DNRs, one respondent said: “We were advised to have them in place for all residents. We acted in accordance with medical advice and resident wishes, not as advised by a directive to put in place for all by a clinical care group representative. We challenged this as unethical.”

Another said that DNRs were “put in place without family consent by trust staff, and no consultation with staff in the home”.

Stephen Powis, the NHS England medical director, wrote to NHS staff in April banning blanket DNRs after a practice in Port Talbot, south Wales, was found to have asked elderly patients to complete forms to stop emergency services being called if they contracted Covid-19.

A surgery in Somerset was found to have told autistic adults that they should sign DNRs to prevent resuscitation if they became critically ill. The learning disability care provider Turning Point said that it had received an “unprecedented” number of DNR forms from GPs.

 

Professor Leary told The Daily Telegraph: “I was quite surprised how many people reported issues with DNRs as I was expecting one or two, but that 10 per cent of the respondents raised an issue, because they were either blanket decisions for whole populations, or they were imposed without discussion with the care home or the family or the residents, is really worrying.

“These decisions were being made by NHS managers not clinicians. And this wasn’t just happening with elderly people, it was those with learning disabilities or cognitive problems of all ages.

“I think there should be an inquiry. The way the situation for care homes has been handled needs a retrospective view, particularly because winter is coming, which is always a difficult time for this group of people.”

Crystal Oldman, the QNI’s chief executive, said: “More needs to be done to understand the effect of Covid-19 on the workforce and residents in care homes.

“Urgent attention must be paid to the sector if the workforce is to withstand the additional demands of the pandemic, particularly in planning, 

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9 minutes ago, Fluke said:

 

Nice to see you fluke 

 

 

This too on Sweden

 

 

monday august 24 2020

News

CORONAVIRUS

Sweden claims fall in coronavirus infection rate is down to immunity

The infection rate in France is more than 60 per cent higher than that of Sweden

 

Bruno Waterfierld

Monday August 24 2020, 12.01am, The Times

 

Sweden is beating many European countries in the fight against new coronavirus infections, possibly because of its decision not to implement tough lockdown measures.

As cases surge across Europe, leading to new restrictions such as the mandatory wearing of masks in many public areas, the infection rate in Sweden is falling.

“Sweden is doing fine,” Arne Elofsson, a professor in biometrics at Stockholm University, said. “Strict rules do not work as people seem to break them.”

Figures from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control show that the infection rate in France is more than 60 per cent higher than that of Sweden. France implemented a strict lockdown in the spring and requires masks to be worn in many public areas but has a fortnightly infection rate of 60 cases per 100,000 people.

Sweden, which decided not to implement compulsory measures at that time and which rejected the use of masks, has a rate of 37 cases per 100,000 people. The government is recording between 200 and 300 new cases a day, with deaths down to three last Friday.

Anders Tegnell, the Swedish state epidemiologist leading the response to the pandemic, has noted, based on the statistics, that infection rates have increased in countries such Spain, Belgium and France during and following the mandatory wearing of masks in many public areas. “The belief that masks can solve our problem is very dangerous,” he said last week.

From the beginning of the pandemic Sweden built its response on voluntary social-distancing guidelines, including home-working and recommendations for people to avoid public transport.

Compulsory measures were limited to a ban on gatherings of more than 50 people, restrictions on visiting care homes, and table-only service in bars and restaurants. On Friday Stefan Lofven, the prime minister, told the newspaper Dagens Nyheter: “What has been discussed most, and what we did differently in Sweden, was that we did not close schools. Now there are quite a few people who think we were right.”

The decision not to implement a lockdown was not without cost. Sweden’s per capita death rate from Covid-19 is the sixth highest in the world and much higher than its Nordic neighbours: more than five times Denmark’s.

 

 

Even in terms of the death rate, however, Sweden’s experience is more complex than first apparent. Half the country’s 5,810 Covid-19 deaths have taken place in care homes, rather than in the general population.

Belgium, which implemented a stringent lockdown in March, has the highest per capita death rate from the virus in the world. Similarly to Sweden, about half the Belgian deaths occurred among elderly and infirm people in care homes who were not affected by the absence or otherwise of lockdown measures.

“Clearly it is a tragedy that so many people died in the elderly homes but it is not really clear what would have been the best strategy to avoid that,” Professor Elofsson said.

One key factor in Sweden’s lower rate of infection is thought to be the emergence of a form of “herd immunity” that is more advanced among Swedes than in countries where lockdowns were implemented.

This means that Sweden is now, according to some evidence, benefiting from avoiding compulsory restrictions.

Looking at the total number of people infected since the crisis began, Sweden has one of the highest figures in Europe, at 843 cases per 100,000 people. In France, after restrictions on social interaction and measures such as the use of masks, which will be compulsory at work from September 1, the total figure is 349 cases per 100,000.

The higher level of cases among the general population in Sweden is thought — by Dr Tegnell and other Swedish scientists — to indicate a form of immunity much wider than that accounted for by the numbers of people carrying antibodies for the virus.

“What we are seeing now in Sweden is a rapid decline in the number of cases, and of course some sort of immunity must be responsible for that since nothing else has changed,” Dr Tegnell told the Unherd website last month.

A study publicised by the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm last week found that people who test negative for antibodies may still have a high level of immunity, through white blood cells that identify and destroy the virus. “T-cells are a type of white blood cells that are specialised in recognising virus-infected cells,” Professor Marcus Buggert, an immunologist at the institute, said. “Our results indicate that roughly twice as many people have developed T-cell immunity compared with those who we can detect antibodies in.”

The research indicates that levels of combined T-cell and antibody immunity could be more than 30 per cent, giving Sweden an edge in preventing the same resurgence in the virus that is taking place across Europe. “I think it is likely that such outbreaks will be easier to control in Sweden because there is immunity among the population,” Dr Tegnell said. “All previous experience with measles and other diseases shows that a high level of immunity in the population makes it easier to control the outbreaks than when there is no immunity at all among the population.”

Sweden’s approach to the virus has prompted heated debate at home and abroad. Around the time that deaths passed 1,000 in April, 22 of the country’s scientists wrote an article in Dagens Nyheter accusing “officials without talent” of having “no well-thought-out, well-functioning strategy”. In June, the month that deaths passed 5,000, Dr Tegnell said: “If we would encounter the same disease, with exactly what we know about it today, I think we would land midway between what Sweden did and what the rest of the world did.”

Mr Lofven agreed to a public inquiry but later told The Times: “We wanted to implement measures and to take decisions that we thought could be sustainable for a long time. Locking down a society? You can’t do that for too long.”

Europe

 

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